West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Carmarthen WW2 Memorial

Carmarthen is the County Town of Carmarthenshire, and is the second largest town in the county, after Llanelli. The men of Carmarthen who fell during World War Two are commemorated on the County War Memorial, which is located at Priory Street. There are no names on the memorial, so the men and women commemorated in this document are all of the ones that I can identify as being from the town. Apologies for any omissions, it is not intentional. It is easy for me to add extra details, and I will do as more information surfaces. To download a PDF sheet of this page with photographs inserted, please follow this link: Carmarthen WW2 War Memorial.

 

Carmarthen War Memorial, World War Two, 1939-1945

 

John Edward Wilberforce Arthur, Wing Commander, 87084, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Arthur and Hannah Jane Arthur, of Penrhos, Carway View, Carmarthen. He served in the Royal Air Force in the Middle East, after being commissioned from Leading Aircraftman on 3 July 1940. John died in North Africa on 29 September 1943. He was 37 years old, and is buried in Medjez-El-Bab War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

Archie Wilson Arundel, Flight Sergeant, 964173, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Archie was the son of Phillip John and Ellen Arundel, of Carmarthen, and the husband of Violet M. Arundel (nee Northam), of Carmarthen. He served with 2742 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was an Armoured Cars unit, and landed at Gold Beach on D-Day plus 22, 28 June 1944, for airfield defence duties. Archie died in France on 5 March 1945, aged 31. He is buried in Choloy War Cemetery, France. His brother Ivor also fell.

 

Ivor Arthur Arundel, Private, 3961939, Welch Regiment. Ivor was the son of Philip and Ellen Arundel, of Pentrefelin, Carmarthen. He served with the 16th (HD) Battalion, Welch Regiment. Ivor died on active service at Cardiff on 25 June 1940, aged 23, and was brought home to be buried in Carmarthen (Tabernacle) Baptist Chapelyard, Wales. His brother Archie also fell.

 

Joseph Anthony Barnett, Corporal, 3971518, Devonshire Regiment. Joseph was the son of Thomas and Catherine Barnett, and the husband of Elizabeth A. Barnett, of Carmarthen. He served with the 1st Battalion, Devonshire Regiment, which was based in India and Burma. Joseph died in India on 3 August 1944, aged 31. He is buried in Imphal War Cemetery, India. He is commemorated on a memorial at Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

William James Bennett, Civilian. William lived at 98, Townhill Road, Mayhill, Swansea, and was a Firewatcher. He was injured during a German air raid on Swansea on 20 February 1941, and died at Carmarthen infirmary on 28 February 1941, aged 58.

 

William Donald Bowen, Sergeant (Flight Engineer), 1378175, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Thomas Benjamin and Mary Bowen, of Carmarthen, and the husband of Beryl Bowen, of Carmarthen. He served with 15 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, armed with the Short Stirling III, based at RAF Bourn. On the night of 1 March 1943, William took off from Bourn as part of the crew of Stirling W7518. At around 01.00 the following morning, the Halifax was intercepted by a German FW night fighter, and was shot down above the Oosterschelde. Of the crew of seven, only one man escaped. William and five of his crewmates died in the crash on the morning of 2 March 1943, and are buried together at Bergen-Op-Zoom War Cemetery, Netherlands. William was 27 years old.

 

Bertie John Brock, Lance Corporal, T/14409040, Royal Army Service Corps. Bertie was the son of George and Ella Brock, of Merton Park, Surrey. He served with the Royal Army Service Corps. Bertie died at Carmarthen Infirmary on 5 June 1945, aged 20, and is buried in Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

Arthur Sidney Buckland, Private, 4036619, Durham Light Infantry. Arthur was the son of Herbert and Elizabeth A. Buckland, of Hereford, and the husband of Arianwen Buckland (nee Phillips), of Carmarthen. He served with the 10th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, which was attached to the 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division. The division landed on Normandy after D-Day and took part in the breakout from the Beach-Head. Arthur was killed in Normandy on 11 September 1944, aged 23. He is buried in Ryes War Cemetery, Bazenville, France.

 

 

Betty Maud Burgess, Nurse. Betty is not commemorated by the CWGC, so pending further research, nothing more is currently known of her, but she is commemorated on the Llangunnor War Memorial.

 

James Patrick Burns, Sergeant, 3956118, Royal Armoured Corps. James was the son of James Joseph and Marie E. J. Burns, of Carmarthen Barracks, and the husband of Eileen Burns, of Winchester. He served with the 3rd Royal Tank Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps. The regiment moved to the Middle East in 1941, and as part of the 1st Armoured Brigade moved to Greece. It withdrew to North Africa after the fall of Greece, to serve with the 7th Armoured Division. James was killed just weeks before the 1st Battle of El Alamein, on 7 June 1942, aged 31. He is buried in Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Acroma, Libya.   

 

Daniel E. Butters, Leading Aircraftman, Royal Air Force. Daniel was born  at Carmarthen in 1920, the son of Alfred John Butters and Mary Jane Butters (nee Williams). He served as a Leading Aircraftsman with the Royal Air Force. Little else is presently known of Daniel, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC, but he died in 1944.

 

Philip Jarvie Carnie, Master, Merchant Navy. Philip was the husband of Annie Carnie, of Carmarthen. He served with the Merchant Navy, as Master of the S.S. Baron Semple, an Ardrossan registered cargo steamer. On 2 November 1943 she was on route from Rio de Janeiro for Freetown, with a cargo of iron ore, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-848 off Ascension Island, and sank with the loss of all hands. Philip was 46 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Edgar Roy Carruthers, Flight Lieutenant (Pilot), 155753, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Edgar was the son of Christopher and Hannah Carruthers, of Carmarthen. He served as a Pilot with 609 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Hawker Typhoon IB. The Squadron had played an important part in the war since the Normandy landings, taking part in air strikes on vital targets in occupied Europe. After the end of the war, the Squadron remained in Germany, based at RAF Wunstorf. Edgar died in Germany on 8 August 1945, and is buried in Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Frederick Thomas Chamberlain, Captain, 75818, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Frederick was the son of Harry and Frances Mary Chamberlain, and the husband of Florence Elizabeth Chamberlain, of Carmarthen. He served throughout the war with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Frederick died in hospital in York on 7 December 1946, aged 43. He was brought home for burial at Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

Wilfred Herbert Currier, Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner), 1316120, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Wilfred was the son of Herbert George and Alice Currier, of Carmarthen. He served with 115 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Avro Lancaster II, based at RAF Little Snoring. Wilfred was killed when his Lancaster was shot down over Germany on 18 October 1943. He was 22 years old, and is buried in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Thomas William Reynold Daniel, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1315951, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of William Henry and Margaret Emily Daniel, of Carmarthen. He served as an Air Gunner with 78 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Avro Halifax, based at RAF Breighton. Thomas was among the seven crew members of a Halifax who died on 12 June 1943 when they were shot down and crashed near Eindhoven. Thomas was 21 years old, and is buried in Eindhoven (Woensel) General Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

Alan Scourfield Davies, Stoker, D/KX 118076, Royal Navy. Alan was born on 5 July 1921, the son of David John and Catherine Jane Davies, of Carmarthen. He served as a stoker aboard the Leander-class light cruiser HMS Neptune. She took part in the hunt for the battleship Graf Spee during the early months of the war and was en-route to Uruguay when the Germans scuttled Graf Spee off Montevideo on 17 December 1939. She was then despatched to the Mediterranean and took part in the action against the Italian Fleet in the battle of Calabria, on 9 July 1940, where she was hit by a 6 inch shell. During 1941 she led Force K, a raiding squadron of cruisers tasked with destroying German and Italian convoys en route to Libya. On 18 December 1941 Force K was sent out to intercept a convoy bound for Tripoli. On the night of 19 – 20 December, Neptune struck two mines. While reversing out of the minefield she struck another mine which blew off her propellers. Two other cruisers also struck mines and were unable to help, so two destroyers were sent in to tow Neptune out. The leading destroyer also struck a mine, so the captain of Neptune signalled the second to stay clear. Soon after Neptune drifted into a fourth mine which caused her to capsize and sink, going down with the loss of 737 men. Thirty men survived but only one was rescued alive. Alan was among the dead. He was 20 years old and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Arthur James Davies, Private, 3963477, Welch Regiment. Arthur was born in Carmarthen on 16 August 1920, the son of Watkyn and Margaret Davies. He married Margaret Avril Morris, of Porthcawl, on 25 May 1942, probably whilst serving there with the 15th Battalion, Welch Regiment. He subsequently transferred to the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was the Carmarthenshire Territorial battalion, attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division landed in Normandy during the end of June 1944 and took over the line at Grainville-sur-Odon. During the coming weeks the division took part in heavy fighting during the break-out from Normandy and the subsequent drive north through France and Belgium into Holland, taking part in Operation Market Garden. Arthur was killed towards the end of the taking of the Dutch town of S’Hertogenbosch on 24 October 1944. He was 24 years old and is buried in Uden War Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

David Davies, Gunner, 1747527, Royal Artillery. David was the son of Albert and Sarah Jane Davies, of Carmarthen, and the husband of Elizabeth Davies, of Carmarthen. Little is presently known of him, but he served with the Royal Artillery, and died on active service on 25 February 1942, aged 33. David is buried in Carmarthen (Tabernacle) Baptist Chapelyard.

 

Douglas Thomas Davies, Lance Corporal, 2734786, Welsh Guards. Douglas was the son of Victor Henton Davies and Elizabeth Davies, of 58 Priory Street, Carmarthen. He served with the 2nd Armoured Battalion, Welsh Guards, which was attached to the Guards Armoured Division. Between 18 to 29 June 1944 the battalion landed in Normandy, and took part in the break out from the Normandy Beach-Head. It then took part in the infamous fighting in the Bocage, before heading towards Holland, with the Guards Armoured Division, and taking part in Operation Market Garden. Douglas was killed in Holland after the crossing of the Rhine, on 9 April 1945. He was 24 years old, and is buried in Oldenzaal Protestant Cemetery, Overijssel, Netherlands.

 

Edward David Davies, Lance Corporal, 3962412, Monmouthshire Regiment. Edward was the son of Evan Tom and Mary Ann Davies, and the husband of Sarah Nancy Davies, of Carmarthen. He served with the 3rd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment, which was attached to the 11th Armoured Division. The division had landed in Normandy in June 1944, and took part in the break-out from Normandy, and the subsequent drive through France into Belgium and Holland, during Operation Market Garden. Edward was killed in Holland on 17 October 1944, aged 29. He is buried in Venray War Cemetery, Limburg, Netherlands.

 

James Glyn Davies, Flying Officer, 175652, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. James was the son of Thomas and Mary Davies, of Carmarthen, and the husband of Hannah May Davies, of Carmarthen. He served with 166 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster III, based at RAF Kirmington. James was killed when his Lancaster was shot down while returning from a raid on Germany on 24 September 1944. He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

James William Elias Davies, DFC, Flight Sergeant, 37796, Royal Air Force. James, known as Jimmy, was born in America, the son of David Ashley Davies and Catherine J. Davies, who later moved their family to Carmarthen. He joined the Royal Air Force in 1936, and by the outbreak of war was a fighter pilot with 79 Squadron, which was equipped with the Hawker Hurricane I, based at RAF Biggin Hill in Kent. The squadron was soon in action and by the end of June 1940 Davies had already claimed six German aircraft, with two shared claims. On 27 June 1940 he was due to be presented with the Distinguished Flying Cross from the King when he was sent as an escort to protect six aircraft on a reconnaissance mission to the French port of St Valery. Jimmy was piloting one of three Hurricanes on the flight, when they were attacked by three Messerschmitt Bf109s over the English Channel. One of the Hurricanes escaped, but Jimmy and one other were shot down into the sea, the other one pilot bailing out safely. Jimmy became the first American born pilot to be shot down and killed in World War Two. He was 26 years old. His Distinguished Flying Cross, which he didn’t see himself, was awarded for ‘This officer has shown ability as a leader of his squadron on many offensive patrols. On one occasion while attacking a Messerschmitt 109, he was himself attacked by six Heinkel 113's. He at once turned on the Heinkels destroying one and badly damaging a second before being compelled to break off the engagement owing to shortage of ammunition. The following day he sighted and attacked a large formation of Heinkel 111's and shot one down in flames.’ He had also been Mentioned in Despatches for his gallant conduct.

 

John Derrick Edwards Davies, Pilot Officer (Air Gunner), 176215, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Daniel Edwards Davies and Katherine Davies, of Market Harborough, Leicestershire. He served with 180 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the North American Mitchell II, based at RAF Dunsfold. John died on 15 June 1944, probably during an air crash. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey.

 

Oliver Geoffrey Davies, Flight Sergeant, 972287, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Oliver was the son of John Joseph and Kate Marion Davies, of Carmarthen. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 612 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Vickers Wellington VIII, based at RAF Wick on an anti-submarine role. Oliver was killed on 9 November 1942, aged 22, and is buried in Midvaag Military Cemetery, Faroe Islands.

 

Thomas Anthony Frederick Davies, Sergeant (Navigator), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of James and Mary Ellen Davies, of Carmarthen. He served with 158 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Vickers Wellington II, based at RAF Driffield. Thomas was killed when his Wellington was shot down over the sea while returning from a mission over Germany on 12 April 1942. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

George Francis Done, Sergeant (Navigator), 1338185, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. George was the son of George and Margaret Done, of Northwich. He had gained his Teachers Diploma at Trinity College, Carmarthen prior to the war. George trained as a Navigator, and was posted to 9 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Waddington. On 31 January 1943 George was flying as Navigator aboard Lancaster Serial ED481, which was returning home after a successful raid on Hamburg. The Lancaster was diverted to RAF Leeming, but crashed into Hawnby Hill in the North Yorkshire Moors, killing all the crew. George was 21 years old, and was buried in Northwich Cemetery, England.

 

Frank Gerald Edwards, Corporal, 321290, Royal Armoured Corps. Frank was the son of Rhys Caradoc Edwards, and of Gertrude Edwards, of Carmarthen. He served with the 15th/19th The King's Royal Hussars, Royal Armoured Corps. The unit was the divisional reconnaissance regiment of the 11th Armoured Division, and landed in Normandy at sometime after June 1944. Frank was killed in Normandy on 19 August 1944, aged 28. He is buried in Banneville-La-Campagne War Cemetery, France.

 

Benjamin Kenneth Hall Evans, Sergeant (Flight Engineer), 1031846, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Benjamin was the son of Mrs Jones of Carmarthen. He served with 467 (RAAF) Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a mainly Australian unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Bottesford. Benjamin was killed when his Lancaster crashed in Switzerland on 12 July 1943. He is buried in Vevey (St. Martins) Cemetery, Switzerland.

 

Douglas Henry Evans, Private, Home Guard. Douglas was the son of David and Annie Amelia Evans, of Tudorville, Llangunnor. He served with the 44th Warwickshire (Birmingham) Battalion, Home Guard. Douglas died in Birmingham on 14 August 1943, aged 17. He was buried in Llangunnor (St. Cynwr) Churchyard.

 

Harold Lloyd Evans, Lieutenant, 253650, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Harold was born in Llanelli early in 1920. He married Henrietta McCree, of 234, Bushbury Road, Fallings Park, Wolverhampton in 1942. Harold had been commissioned into the Royal Welch Fusiliers, but after being posted to the Far East was attached to the Headquarters of the 2nd West African Infantry Brigade, R.W.A.F.F. Harold died in Burma on 15 March 1945, aged 25, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar. His widow Henrietta later moved to Carmarthen, before marrying again and moving to Llanelli.

 

John Evans, B.A., B.M., B.Ch., (Oxon), Lieutenant, 328024, Royal Army Medical Corps. John was the son of Herbert John and Eveline Maye Evans, of Carmarthen He served with the Royal Army Medical Corps, and was posted to India. John became ill in India, and died at Poona Military Hospital on 20 July 1945, aged 24. He is buried in Kirkee War Cemetery, India.

 

Mair Eluned Evans, Sister, 234957, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Mair was the Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. Evans, of Nantycaws. She served as a Sister with Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. On 23 November 1942 Mair sailed from Liverpool aboard the S.S. Ceramic, a requisitioned former White Star Liner, which was bound for Australia. On the night of 6 December 1942 she was west of the Azores when she was hit by three torpedoes which had been fired from the German submarine U-515. Lifeboats were launched, but U-515 torpedoed her again, sinking Ceramic. The sea conditions were stormy, and the lifeboats capsized. Only one man survived the sinking, as he was taken by the Germans for interrogation. Mair was 27 years old when she died on 7 December 1942, and she is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey.

 

Walter Picton Evans, Corporal, 7382463, Royal Army Medical Corps. Walter was the son of Evan Walter and Elizabeth Evans, of Carmarthen. He was educated at Carmarthen Grammar School and Llandovery prior to the war, and later served with the Royal Army Medical Corps. Walter was quite possibly wounded during the North African Campaign. He died at Cirencester on 14 March 1943, aged 29, and is buried in Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

William David Evans, Sergeant (Navigator), 1005138, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Robert and Margaret Ann Evans, of Carmarthen. He served with 9 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Waddington. William was killed when his Lancaster was brought down on 31 August 1943. He is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Robert Furlong, Gunner, 1493232, Royal Artillery. Robert was serving with 9 Coast Regiment, Royal Artillery prior to the Japanese invasion of Malaya in December 1941. He was taken prisoner when the Singapore Garrison surrendered that month, and was held at Changi Jail. Robert died in captivity on 14 May 1942, aged 23, and is buried in Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.

 

Albert Michael Griffiths, Flight Sergeant (Pilot), 1382927, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Albert was the son of William George and Clara Eliza Griffiths, of 'Shorncliffe', Carmarthen. He served as a Pilot with 72 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was armed with the Supermarine Spitfire VC, and was based at Comiso in Sicily after the invasion of the Island in 1943. Albert was killed in Sicily on 16 July 1943. He was 26 years old, and is buried in Syracuse War Cemetery, Sicily.

 

Cyril Elvet Griffiths, Sapper, 2000886, Royal Engineers. Cyril was the son of D. H. and Sophia Griffiths, of Newchurch, Carmarthen. He served with the 3rd Field Squadron, Royal Engineers, which was attached to the 10th Armoured Division, under the command of General Bernard Montgomery in North Africa. Cyril was killed in action in North Africa on 7 January 1942. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 48 of the Alamein Memorial, Libya.

 

Reginald Thomas John Griffiths, Flight Sergeant, 640904, Royal Air Force. Reginald was the son of Thomas John and Louisa Griffiths, and the husband of Gwyneth Margaret Griffiths, of Johnstown, Carmarthen. He served as an Air Gunner with 10 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Handley Page Halifax III, based at RAF Melbourne. Reginald was killed when his Halifax was shot down over Italy on 19 July 1944. He was 23 years old, and is buried in Bari War Cemetery, Italy.

 

John Howard Harries, Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner), 1258385, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Sydney Hermann Harries and Daisy Harries of Carmarthen, and the husband of Mary Josephine Harries, of Cowley, Middlesex. He served with 115 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Vickers Wellington, based at RAF Marham in Norfolk. John was killed when his Wellington was shot down over France on 29 April 1942. He was 20 years old, and is buried in Bievres Communal Churchyard, near Versailles, France.

 

William John Healy, Private, 3956610, Welch Regiment. William was the son of William R. Healy and Hannah Ann Healy, and the husband of Mary Kezia Healy, of Carmarthen. He had served during the war with the Welch Regiment, and died as a result of his service on 25 August 1946, aged 35. William is buried in Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

Albert Michael Herring, Fusilier, 14808829, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Albert was the son of David Ernest and Violet Herring, of Carmarthen. He served with the 4th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division landed in Normandy at the end of June 1944, and took part in the break out from the Normandy beach-head, and the subsequent drive trough France and Belgium into Holland. Albert was killed in Germany on 16 April 1945, aged 19, and is buried in Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Peter Ralph Higgs, Trooper, 1421252, Nottinghamshire Yeomanry. Peter was the son of Pryce James Higgs, and of Lillian Higgs, of Carmarthen. He served with the Nottinghamshire Yeomanry, which was attached to the Royal Armoured Corps. The Regiment landed in France on D-Day, 6 June 1944, equipped with the Duplex Drive Sherman and Sherman Firefly tanks, nicknamed 'Hobart's Funnies' because of their peculiar designs. It took part in the break out from Normandy and in the advance across northern France and Belgium. Peter was killed in Belgium on 11 September 1944, aged 20. He is buried in Geel War Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Leslie Holmes, Private, 3959228, Dorsetshire Regiment. Leslie was the son of Daisy Maud Holmes, and the foster-son of Jane Vaughan, of Carmarthen. He served with the 1st Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment, which was attached to 231 Infantry Brigade. The battalion had fought at Malta, Sicily and Italy before returning to England, and landed in Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1944. It then took part in the drive through France and Belgium into Holland, crossing the Rhine at Arnhem on 26 September 1944. Leslie was killed soon after, on 10 November 1944, aged 29. He is buried in Arnhem Oosterbeek War Cemetery, Gelderland, Netherlands.

 

James Hywel Hughes, Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner), 1381323, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. James was the son of William David and Margaret Hughes, of Knightsford, Carmarthen. He served with 77 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Handley Page Halifax II, based at RAF Elvington. James died when his Halifax was shot down during a raid over Germany on 10 March 1943. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Durnbach War Cemetery, Germany.

 

John Hurley, Private, 33298, Welch Regiment. John was the son of John and Johanna Hurley, of Ireland, and the adopted son of Ada Thompson, of 15 Mill Street Carmarthen. He married Susan Booth at Llanelli in 1920. He served with the Welch Regiment, and died in Cheshire on 9 December 1941, aged 44. He is buried in Chester (Overleigh) Cemetery. His wife Susan had died at Llanelli in 1940, aged 37.

 

Mary James, Civilian. Mary was the daughter of Henry James and Elizabeth Davies, of 62 Richmond Terrace Carmarthen, and the wife of John Henry James, of 35, Bell Grove, Eastry. She was killed at home during an air raid on 6 May 1941, aged 39, along with her daughter.

 

David William Phillip Jenkins, Private, 3970038, Welch Regiment. David was the husband of Minnie Jenkins, of 20, Davies Town, Pensarn. He initially served with the Welch regiment, but volunteered to serve with the Army Commandos. David was posted to the Commando Training Centre at Achnacarry, Scotland, where he joined No. 12 Commando. David was killed during exercises at Achnacarry on 8 August 1941, aged 26, and was buried in Llangunnor (St. Cynwr) Churchyard. Photograph courtesy of Bev Lewis, Swansea.

 

Samuel Leslie Jenkins, Captain, 88225, South Wales Borderers. Samuel was the son of John and Ellen Jenkins, of Carmarthen, and the husband of Jean Rosaleen Jenkins, of Llanarthney. He was a Captain with the South Wales Borderers, before applying for Commando training, and was posted to No. 2 Commando. On 4 March 1944 Samuel and another officer of 2 Commando were on reconnaissance in preparation for a raid on Solta, when Samuel was wounded and captured. He died on 6 March 1944, aged 29, and is buried in Belgrade War Cemetery, Serbia & Montenegro.

 

William James Polson Jenkins, Stoker 1st Class, C/KX89342, Royal Navy. William was from Carmarthen, and served as a Stoker aboard H.M.S. Kelly. On 9 May 1940 Kelly was searching for a German U-Boat in the North Sea, along with the destroyers H.M.S. Kandahar and H.M.S. Bulldog, when they came under torpedo attack by swift moving German E-Boats. Kelly was hit by one torpedo, and sustained serious damage, with the boiler room being flooded, and 27 men were killed. William was among the dead. He was buried in Hebburn Cemetery, England. Kelly was commanded by Lord Louis Mountbatten, and was lost off Crete the following year.

 

Benjamin Bryn Jones, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1183725, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Benjamin was the son of Henry and Margaret Jones, of Carmarthen. He served with 207 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Langar. Benjamin was killed when his Lancaster was shot down over Belgium on 27 April 1943. He was 22 years old, and is buried in Schoonselhof Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Bryn Myrddin Jones, Lance Corporal, 2738087, Welsh Guards. Bryn was born in Pontypridd in 1922, the son of Edward and Hannah Jones. He married Lilian Adelene Lewis in Carmarthen in 1942. Bryn served with the 2nd Armoured Reconnaissance Battalion, Welsh Guards. The battalion had been decimated at Boulogne in 1940 and had been rebuilt back in Britain before being converted into an armoured unit. The 1st and 2nd Battalions, Welsh Guards landed in Arromanches between 18-29 June 1944 and took part in the break-out from the Normandy beach-head and the terrible fighting in the Bocage. During the end of August and early September the Welsh Guards took part in the drive through northern France, reaching the World War One battlefields of Arras before heading north into Belgium. On 3 September the Welsh Guards liberated Brussels before advancing through Wavre, Helchteren, Hechtel and Leopoldsburg. Bryn became one of many casualties suffered by the Welsh Guards when he was killed near Leopoldsburg on 12 September 1944. He was 22 years old and is buried in Leopoldsburg War Cemetery, Belgium. The sad epitaph placed on his headstone by his wife reads:

 

We Planned a Lovely Future

Only to end in a Dream

I Think of you Always Dear

And of What Might Have Been

 

Brynmor Samuel Jones, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1061957, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Brynmor was the son of George and Eliza Jones, of Carmarthen. He served with 57 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Vickers Wellington II, based at RAF Feltwell. Brynmor was killed when his Wellington crashed in Holland on 15 October 1941. He was 25 years old, and is buried in Jonkerbos War Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

David Richard Jones, Driver, T/255874, Royal Army Service Corps. David was born at Carmarthen in 1904. He served as a Driver with the Royal Army Service Corps. Very little is known of him, but he died on 27 December 1942 aged 38, and is buried in Gibraltar (North Front) Cemetery, Gibraltar.

 

Derric Isaac Jones, Flying Officer (Navigator/Bomber), 120809, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Derric was the son of Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Jones, of Carmarthen. He served with the Royal Air Force as a Navigator with No 1 (Coastal) Operational Training Unit. On 10 November 1942, Derric was flying as Navigator aboard Lockheed Hudson, Serial AM680 on a night navigation exercise, when the aircraft struck high ground at Beda Fell, Ullswater, killing all four of her crew. Derric was 22 years old when he died on 10 November 1942, and he is buried in Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

Ivor Maurice Jones, Lieutenant, Royal Australian Naval Volunteer Reserve. Ivor was born at Carmarthen on 13 May 1907, the son of Arthur and Edith Jones. He had served with the Royal Navy prior to the war, and lived with his wife Gwendoleen Maheno Jones, at Eketahuna, New Zealand. Ivor enlisted into the Royal Australian Navy, and served aboard H.M.A.S. Australia, a County Class Heavy Cruiser. She served in the Pacific Ocean, and on 21 October 1944 became the first Allied ship to be hit by a Japanese Kamikaze attack, when an aircraft hit her bridge. Ivor was among a number of men killed in the explosion. He was 37 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Mervyn Anthony Jones, Flight Sergeant, 748630, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Mervyn was the son of Herbert and Anne Elisabeth Jones, of Carmarthen. He was a well known jockey prior to the war, and had ridden the winner of the Grand National Steeplechase in 1940, not long after having enlisted into the Royal Air Force along with his brother William. Both men qualified as Pilots, and Mervyn was posted to No. 1 Photographic Reconnaissance Unit, Royal Air Force. Mervyn was posted missing after a North Sea sortie on 3 April 1942, aged 23. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. His brother William died just over two years later. Both brothers medals were sold at Dix Noonan Webb on 6 July 2004.

 

Percy Edwin Jones, Private, 3909354, South Wales Borderers. Percy was born in Carmarthen in 1916. He served with the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion landed in Norway in April 1940 to support the Norwegian army against any possible German attacks. On 30 April the battalion saw its first action against the Germans on the Ankenes Peninsula. Percy was killed here on 2 May 1940, aged 24, and is buried in Ballangen New Cemetery, Norway.

 

Richard Glynne Jones, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1171578, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Richard was the son of Richard and Lucy Jones, of 6 Chaxton Street, Oxford. His father was a compositor with the Weekly Reporter in Carmarthen, and his Aunt was Mrs Parson, of 11 Friars Park, Carmarthen. Richard served with the Royal Air Force, and died on active service in Suffolk on 19 August 1940, aged 25. Richard is buried in Honington (All Saints) Churchyard, Suffolk.

 

William Hywel Anthony Jones, DFC, Flying Officer, 139316, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Herbert and Anne Elisabeth Jones, of Carmarthen. He was a well known jockey like his brother Mervyn, and rode against him in the 1940 Grand National, falling from his horse ‘National Night’. William had enlisted into the Royal Air Force with Mervyn, and qualified as a Pilot, joining 517 Squadron, which was a Coastal Command unit, equipped with the Handley Page Halifax V, based at RAF Brawdy. During the war, William made several daring attacks against German U-Boats. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, and was also Mentioned in Despatches for his gallantry during the war. The recommendation for his DFC, published in the London Gazette of 20 August 1943, read; ‘Pilot Officer Jones has maintained a very high standard in his work throughout his operational career. He made four attacks on U-Boats, inflicting damage on three occasions. He has also made a very determined attack on a blockade runner. Recently he was captain of an aircraft which successfully fought off attacks by seven Ju. 88s over a period of 45 minutes. The safe return of the aircraft was largely due to this officer’s fine tactics and superb airmanship.’ His Mention in despatches was listed in the London Gazette of 1 January 1943. William was posted missing during his second tour of operations on 14 November 1944. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. His medals were sold along with Mervyn’s in a Dix Noonan Webb Auction on 6 July 2004.

 

William Llewellyn Wynn Jones, Flying Officer (Navigator), 135670, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of John Henry and Martha Lilian Jones, and the husband of Florence Eileen Jones, of Bournville, Birmingham. He was a Scholar of Trinity College, Carmarthen prior to becoming a Navigator with 514 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Avro Lancaster II, based at RAF Waterbeach. William was killed when his Lancaster was brought down over France on 2 May 1944. He was 35 years old, and is buried alongside his fellow crewmen at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.

 

Norman Douglas Kay, Lance Bombardier, 905441, Royal Artillery. Norman was from Croydon, and served with the 97 (The Kent Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. He died at Carmarthen Hospital on 10 November 1940, aged 19, and is buried in Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

John Daniel Kingdon, Sergeant (Pilot), 1013673, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Daniel Richard and Alice Kingdom, and the husband of Dora Howard Kingdon, of Carmarthen. He served as a Pilot with 9 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Vickers Wellington IC, based at RAF Lossiemouth. John was killed in action on 24 June 1942, aged 30, and was cremated at Pontypridd Crematorium.

 

David Daniel Lewis, Private, 3955577, South Wales Borderers. David was the son of William and Mary Lewis, of 2, Little Bridge Street, Carmarthen. He married Alice Eileen Hurley in 1930, and the couple resided at Llangunnor. David served with the South Wales Borderers at the start of the war. He died on active service on 13 December 1941, aged 31, and is buried in Llangunnor (St. Cynwr) Churchyard.

 

Desmond Lewis, Sergeant, 1414771, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Desmond was the son of W. T. and Margaret Lewis, of Carmarthen. He served in 429 (Royal Canadian Air Force) Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Vickers Wellington Mark X based at RAF East Moor. Desmond was just 17 when he was Killed in Action on a bombing raid, on 27 January 1943. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

John Charles Lewis, Chief Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. John was born in Carmarthen in 1879, the son of Thomas and Susan Lewis. The family had moved to Cardiff by 1901, as Thomas worked as a seaman, and John followed him into the Merchant service, before setting up home at Ivanhoe, Bloomfield Road, Bath. By the start of the war John was Chief Engineer aboard the S.S. Hillfern, a Newcastle-on-Tyne registered coastal steamer. On 31 October 1940 Hillfern sank about eight miles off Kinnaird Head, with the loss of eight of her crew. There are conflicting reports of her loss, either by striking a mine, or being attacked by German aircraft. John was among the men lost. He was 61 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

John Irfon Lewis, Leading Aircraftman, 649703, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Robert and Ceinwen Lewis, of Carmarthen. He served with 14 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Martin B-26 Marauder I, based at RAF Fayid in Egypt. John died in North Africa on 18 March 1943. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Fayid War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Victor John Lewis, Lance Sergeant, 2036333, Parachute Regiment. Victor was the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lewis, of Carmarthen. He served with the 10th Battalion, Parachute Regiment, which was formed at Kabrit in 1943. The battalion fought in Italy with the 4th Parachute Brigade, before returning to England. It didn't take part in D-Day, but on 18 September 1944 jumped into Arnhem, and took over the Groesbeek perimeter, during Operation Market Garden. Victor was killed at Arnhem on 21 September 1944, aged 26, during the almost complete annihilation of his battalion. He is commemorated on the Groesbeek Memorial, Gelderland, Netherlands.

 

Harold Lloyd, Gunner, 11259671, Royal Artillery. Harold was the son of Thomas and Caroline Louisa Lloyd, of Carmarthen, and the husband of Gwenllian Lloyd, of Swansea. He served with 505 Battery, 163 H.A.A. Regiment, Royal Artillery. Harold died on active service on 10 April 1945. He was 42 years old, and is buried in Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

Harold Melville Maynard, Radio Officer (Junior), Merchant Navy. Harold was the son of Charles and Hilda Grace Maynard, of Carmarthen. E served with the Merchant Navy aboard the M.V. Silverpalm, a London registered cargo ship. On 9 June 1941 Silverpalm went missing in the North Atlantic, after having probably been sunk by a German U-Boat. Nothing is known of her fate, as all crew were lost. Harold was 17 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Norman George Miller, Private, 4202053, Leicestershire Regiment. Norman was the husband of Elizabeth Ann Miller (nee Lewis), of Brynmeurig, Pensarn. He served with the 2/5th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. The Battalion was mobilised in 1939 and went to France in 1940 as part of the 46th Division. It remained in England after the evacuation from Dunkirk, before taking part in Operation Torch in January 1943, seeing heavy fighting at the Kassarine Pass. The Battalion then took part in the landings at Salerno, and crossed the Volturna and Teano Rivers. Norman was badly wounded in Italy, and died on 20 November 1943, aged 29. He is buried in Bone War Cemetery, Annaba, Italy. Elizabeth passed away in 1976, and is buried in Llangunnor (St. Cynwr) Churchyard.

 

Brinley Morgan, Private, 2140911, Pioneer Corps. Brinley was born at Llangunnor in 1908, the son of William and Annie Morgan. He was brought up at 7, Little Water Street, Carmarthen, and at the outbreak of war enlisted into the Royal Engineers. Brinley was posted to the Middle East with the 59th Field Company, Royal Engineers, and had fought in North Africa, before the invasions of Sicily and then Italy. Brinley was killed in Italy on 18 October 1943, aged 35. He is buried in Naples War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Daniel George Morgan, Cook, Merchant Navy. Daniel was born at Llangunnor in the first quarter of 1920. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Empire Amethyst, a Middlesbrough registered tanker. On 13 April 1942, Empire Amethyst was on route from New Orleans for Freetown, and was about 40 miles south of Haiti, carrying a cargo of 12,000 tons of clean oil, when she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-154 and sunk with the loss of all her crew of 47. Daniel was 22 years old, and is commemorated among his fellow crewmen on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

George Nolan, Sergeant, 7011654, Royal Ulster Rifles. George was the husband of Elizabeth Jane Nolan, of Carmarthen. He served with the 1st (Airborne) Battalion, Royal Ulster Rifles, which was attached to 6 Airlanding Brigade, 6th Airborne Division. The battalion landed around Ranville on D-Day, and captured the village of Longueval. It took part in the fighting in Normandy, before returning to England in September. It then moved back to the front to take part in the defence around the Ardennes, following the Battle of the Bulge. George was killed on 24 March 1945 when the battalion took part in a landing near Hamminkeln, where it was tasked with the capture of the bridge over the River Issel, and to secure the Ringenberg Railway Station. He was buried in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

David Henry Brynmor Norman, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1422929, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of Charles Thomas Norman and May Norman, of Carmarthen. He served with 178 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the B-24 Liberator VI, based at RAF Amendola after the invasion of Italy. David was killed when his Liberator was shot down over Serbia on 8 January 1945. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Belgrade War Cemetery, Serbia & Montenegro. His brother William Christopher Norman was killed in 1944.

 

William Christopher Norman, Lance Corporal, 2047691, Royal Engineers. William was the son of Charles Thomas Norman and May Norman, of Carmarthen. He married Blanche White at Carmarthen in 1941. William served with the Royal Engineers and moved to Normandy at some time following D-Day, on 6 June 1944. He was killed in Normandy on 17 August 1944, aged 23, and is buried in Tilly-sur-Seulles War Cemetery. His brother David Henry Brynmor Norman was killed the following year.

 

James Anthony Rourke O'Flynne, Captain, 109068, Royal Ulster Rifles. James was the son of Dennis and Harriett O'Flynn, and the husband of Teresa Carmen O'Flynn, of Carmarthen. He was commissioned into the Royal Ulster Rifles, and had been attached to the 4th Prince of Wales' Own Gurkha Rifles. James was killed in India on 3 May 1944, aged 31. He is buried in Madras War Cemetery, Chennai, India.

 

Thomas Brian Owen, Sergeant, 1162333, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas Brian Owen was born in 1920 in Laugharne, the son of William and Annie Owen, who later lived in Carmarthen. Thomas was a Sergeant in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve during the war, and remained in the services after the surrender of Germany and Japan in 1945. He died in the RAF Hospital at St. Athan aged 26, on 30 May 1947, after suffering from Tuberculosis and was buried in the new graveyard at St. Martin’s church, Laugharne.

 

Constance Perrott, Civilian. Constance was the daughter of David Edward Perrott. She was killed when the Old Vicarage at St. Ishmael was hit by a German bomb on 1 September 1940. Constance was 40 years old.

 

David Gareth Rees, Sergeant (Flight Engineer), 1653285, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of Tudor and Elizabeth Rees, of Pensarn, Carmarthen. He served as a Flight Engineer with 166 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Kirmington. David was killed when his Lancaster was brought down over Germany during a raid on 22 October 1943. He was 19 years old, and is buried alongside his former crewmen at Hanover War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Dewi Rees, First Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. Dewi was born at Llangunnor, the son of Mrs. P. E. Rees, later of Ewell, Epsom, Surrey, and the husband of Elizabeth Rees, of Haverfordwest. He served with the Merchant Navy, aboard the MV Fort Richepanse, a Belfast registered requisitioned French ship. Dewi was killed when Fort Richepanse was bombed by German aircraft, then torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-567 on 3 September 1941. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Mydrim Richards, Able Seaman, D/JX 195019, Royal Navy. Mydrim was the son of Joseph and Annie Richards, of Carmarthen. He served with the Royal Navy aboard the Halcyon Class Minesweeper H.M.S. Bramble. She served on the Russian Convoys, providing minesweeping cover for the merchant vessels bringing supplies to Russia. On 31 December 1942, Bramble was sunk with all hands by the German cruiser SMS Hipper, during the Battle of the Barents Sea. Mydrim was 22 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Gilbert Humphreys Rogers, Sergeant, 1382746, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gilbert was the son of Herbert and Margaret Rogers. He was a Postman at Carmarthen before the war, then served with 75 (NZ) Squadron, Royal Air Force. The squadron was a heavy bomber unit, crewed mainly by New Zealanders, and was equipped with the Short Stirling, based at RAF Newmarket Heath. Gilbert was killed when his Stirling, Serial EF340, Identifier AA-Q, was lost mine whilst on mine laying duties in the Nectarine region off the Friesian Islands on 5 May 1943. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Thomas E. Royce, Petty Officer Stoker, D/KX 77859, Royal Navy. Thomas was the son of Thomas Royce, and of Elizabeth Royce, of Travellers Rest, Carmarthen. He served with the Royal Navy aboard H.M.S. Drake, and ancient WW1 period River Monitor. She served as a Stoker Training Ship at Plymouth. Thomas died on active service at Plymouth on 21 April 1941, aged 32, and is buried in Plymouth (Weston Mill) Cemetery, Devon.

 

Douglas James Saunders, Gunner, 3962008, Royal Artillery. Douglas was the son of James Oswald Saunders and Minna Saunders, of Carmarthen. He served with the 31st Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, in the Western Desert campaign. Douglas was among a number of men of his battery killed on 15 December 1941, during heavy fighting at Point 204, near Alem Hamza, Cyrenaica. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

Charles Edward Scott, Private, 5671975, Parachute Regiment. Charles was born at Carmarthen, the son of Victor Charles and Irene Blodwen Scott, later of Highbridge, Somerset. He served with the 6th Battalion, Parachute Regiment, which had been formed from the 10th Battalion, The Royal Welch Fusiliers in 1942. The battalion's first action was during Operation Slapstick, at the port of Taranto in September 1943. Charles was among 58 men of the battalion killed on 10 September 1943 when their transport ship, HMS Abdiel, struck a mine off Taranto and sank. Charles was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Cassino Memorial, Italy.

 

Ceiriog Josue Henri Sebire, Private, 14406335, Parachute Regiment. Ceiriog, known as Jose, was the son of Sydney Harold and Olwen Myrddin Sebire. He had been born and raised at Carmarthen, before the family moved to Holloway, London. Jose served with the 9th Battalion, Parachute Regiment. He dropped into Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1944, and took part in the operations around Ranville and the destruction of the Merville Battery. Jose was killed in Normandy on 24 July 1944, aged 20, and is buried in Ranville War Cemetery, France.

 

William James Sivyer, Stoker 1st Class, D/309223, Royal Navy. William was the son of William James Sivyer and Martha Ann Sivyer, and the nephew of Margaret Smith, of Carmarthen. He had served during WW1, and during WW2 was a Stoker in the Royal Navy,  and served at H.M.S. Lucifer, the Royal Naval base at Swansea. William died on 1 January 1945, aged 57, and is buried in Swansea (Morriston) Cemetery.

 

Bruce Leighton Squires, Trooper, 7945575, Royal Armoured Corps. Bruce was the son of Charles Percy and Edith Maud Squires, of Carmarthen. He served with "C" Squadron, North Irish Horse, which was attached to the Royal Armoured Corps. On 2 February 1943 the North Irish Horse landed in Algiers, as part of Operation Torch, equipped with the Churchill tank. After a trying campaign in Tunisia it re-equipped with the Sherman Tank before moving to take part in the Italian campaign. Bruce was killed on 23 May 1944 during a bloody assault on the Adolf Hitler Line, which saw the North Irish Horse suffer terrible casualties. He was 23 years old, and is buried in Cassino War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Gerald Alec Stewart-Rattray, Captain, 66756, Royal Army Service Corps. Gerald was the son of James Alec Rattray and Violet May Rattray, of Plymouth, and the husband of Ada Ernestine Rattray. He was serving with the Royal Army Service Corps, when he died on 18 May 1943, aged 26. Gerald is buried in Carmarthen Cemetery.

 

George David Thacker, Lieutenant, 131438, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. George was the son of George and Susan Thacker; husband of Lettice Thacker, of Carmarthen. He served with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers in the North African campaign. George died in North Africa on 25 February 1943, aged 52, and is buried in Heliopolis War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Adolphus Stephens Thomas, Guardsman, 2734529, Welsh Guards. Adolphus was the son of John N. and Nina S. Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served with the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Guards. The Battalion sailed for North Africa on 5 February 1943, and took part in the North African campaign, before moving to Italy early in 1944. Adolphus was killed on 16 February 1944 near Mount Cerasola. He was 19 years old, and is buried in Cassino War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Albert John Thomas, Private, 3963308, East Yorkshire Regiment. Albert was the son of Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served with the 5th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment. The battalion had landed at Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1944, and took part in the break-out from the Normandy Beach-Head and the subsequent drive through France into Belgium and Holland. Albert was killed in Holland on 27 September 1944, aged 24, and is buried in Jonkerbos War Cemetery, Gelderland, Netherlands.

 

Daniel David Thomas, Sergeant, 2031229, Royal Engineers. Daniel was the son of John Rees Thomas and Elizabeth Thomas, and the husband of Elizabeth Doreen Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served with 580 Army Troops Company, Royal Engineers. Daniel was the second Carmarthenshire man to have been killed with 580 Company in Greece, being killed on 25 April 1941 during the retreat to the coast. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on Face 4 of the Athens Memorial, Greece.

 

David Scurlock Thomas, Guardsman, 2737489, Welsh Guards. David was the son of Niah and Letitia Thomas, of Carmarthen, and the husband of Eleanor Louise Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served with the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Guards. The Battalion sailed for North Africa on 5 February 1943, and took part in the North African campaign. David was killed in North Africa on 9 April 1943, aged 22, and is buried in Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

Herbert William Thomas, Gunner, 1485314, Royal Artillery. Herbert was born in Swansea, the son of George Luther Thomas. The family moved to Carmarthen, where his father worked as a solicitor. Herbert served with the 64th Battery, 34th Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was attached to Western Command at Swansea. Herbert appears to have been killed during a terrible air raid on Plymouth on 21 April 1941. He is buried in Plymouth (Weston Mill) Cemetery.

 

Horace Samuel Thomas, Lance Corporal, 80466, Straits Settlements Volunteer Force. Horace was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served with the 4th (Malacca Volunteer Corps) Battalion, Straits Settlement Force, which was a volunteer force, stationed in Malacca. Horace was taken POW by the Japanese after the invasion of Singapore in December 1941. He was held at Changi Jail until 4 September 1944, when he sailed from Singapore in the Hell Ship Rakuyo Maru, which was crammed with POW's bound for Japan. On 12 September 1944 the ship was torpedoed and sunk by the American Submarine USS Sealion, with the loss of 1,159 POW's. Horace was 27 years old and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore.

 

Melville Elvet Thomas, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1312270, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Melville was the son of David and Annie Thomas, of Llangunnor. Melville served with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. He died at Staines, Middlesex on 23 February 1944, aged 23, and is buried in Llangunnor (St. Cynwr) Churchyard.

 

Stephen George Thomas, Flight Sergeant, 1314103, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Stephen was the son of Stephen L. and Helen J. Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served as a pilot with 14 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the mighty North American P-51 Mustang I. After the Allied invasion of Italy, 14 Squadron moved to Ghisonaccia. Stephen was killed while flying over the Mediterranean on 15 December 1943. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Malta Memorial, Malta.

 

Vincent George Thomas, Private, 3963260, Welch Regiment. Vincent was the son of Sidney George and Agnes May Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served with the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was the local Territorial unit, attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division landed at Normandy at the end of June 1944, and took part in the break-out from the Beach-Head, and the subsequent drive through France and Belgium into Holland. Vincent was killed in Holland on 9 October 1944, aged 26, and is commemorated on the Groesbeek Memorial, Gelderland, Netherlands.

 

William Thomas, Private, 3960949, South Wales Borderers. William was born in Carmarthen and had originally enlisted into the Welch Regiment. He later transferred to the 6th Battalion, South Wales Borderers which sailed for Bombay in October 1942. The battalion had trained to serve as an armoured unit but was disappointed to find that upon arrival in India it was to revert to infantry. It then trained as an amphibious assault unit and moved to Calcutta to attack Akyab. The attack was soon cancelled and the battalion was sent to Burma to fight in the Arakan. It made its name during heavy fighting which resulted in the capture of the Mayu Tunnels. The battalion was then sent to join the joint American-Chinese force under General Stilwell and took part in an epic nine month march through the Burmese jungle which saw them take place in several bloody engagements against the Japanese. William died in Burma on 13 January 1945, aged 26. He is buried in Taukkyan War Cemetery.

 

William Geoffrey Thomas, Third Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. William was the son of Mrs. M. Thomas, of Carmarthen. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Tunisia, a Swansea registered cargo steamer. On 4 August 1941 Tunisia was about 350 miles off Ireland when she was attacked by German aircraft, and sunk. William was 19 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Harold Arthur Trumper, Ordinary Seaman, C/JX 259999, Royal Navy. Harold was the son of Thomas and Ada Trumper, of Carmarthen. He served with the Royal Navy aboard the Flower Class Corvette H.M.S. Zinnia. On 23 August 1941 Zinnia was escorting Convoy OG-71 when she was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-564 and exploded and sunk. Harold was 27 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

Fransisco Ullo, Fusilier, 4204910, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Fransisco was the son of Pasquale and Maria Ullo. He served with the 13th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, which was a home service unit. Fransisco died on 21 June 1942, aged 22, and is buried in Carmarthen (St. Mary) Roman Catholic Churchyard.

 

Lawrence Walters, Warrant Officer, 1316296, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Lawrence was the son of Mrs. P. Jones, and the grandson of Mr. W. J. Walters, of Ffordd, Llangain, Carmarthen. He served with 681 Squadron, which had been formed at Dum Dum in India in 1943, flying on coastal defensive work. The Squadron was initially equipped with the Spitfire IV, but was re-equipped with the Mosquito IX in August that year. In October they received a batch of brand new Supermarine Spitfire XI's, and moved to Alipore in May, 1944. The Squadron flew missions over the Far East throughout its time at war. Little is known of how Lawrence was killed, but he is recorded as having died on 22 February, 1945 aged 23, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial.

 

David Eric Williams, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1047445, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of David and Ellen Williams, of Johnstown, Carmarthen. He served in the Royal Air Force, but his squadron is not recorded by the CWGC. David died on active service near Bridgend on 16 June 1941, aged 20, and is buried in Llanllwch (St. Luke) Churchyard.

 

Arthur William Wynne, Trooper, 4035283, Royal Armoured Corps. Arthur was the son of James and Adelaide Wynne, and the husband of Constance Nancy Gwenneth Wynne, of Carmarthen. He served with the 53rd Regiment, Reconnaissance Corps, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division landed at Normandy at the end of June 1945, and took part in the break out from the Normandy Beach-Head. Arthur was killed in Normandy on 2 August 1944, aged 30, and is buried in St. Manvieu War Cemetery, Cheux, France.

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Website News

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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