West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llanelli (Greenfield Chapel) Memorial

Greenfield Baptist Chapel opened on 1 August 1858, providing the facility of an English speaking Baptist Chapel in Llanelli. It is situated at the junction of Station Road and Murray Street, and is still in use today. Within the Chapel is a war memorial, which was unveiled on 21 September 1921, dedicated to the members of the Chapel who fell during the Great War. The photograph of the memorial is courtesy of Reverend David Jones, Minister of Greenfield Chapel.

The Great War, 1914-1918

William George Brewer, Private, 5022, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of Samuel and Ellen Brewer, of 3, Crooked Row, Llanelli. He was a Tinworker prior to enlisting at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. William was killed here on 10 August 1915, aged 19, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

David Walter Cainan, Lance Corporal, 9866, Rifle Brigade. David was born on 9 April 1886, the son of William and Catherine Cainan, of 49 Albert Street, Llanelli. He had enlisted into the army on 4 May 1903, and had served in Malta and India, prior to the outbreak of war, with the 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade. The battalion was recalled to Britain from India, where it joined 25 Brigade, 8th Division, and moved to the Western Front in October 1914. They saw their first major action at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, and it was here, on 14 March 1915, that David was killed. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg L'Avoue, France.

Clifford Davies, Private, 14733, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Clifford was the son of Edwin Thomas Davies and Sarah Ann Davies, of 29, Mansel Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 8th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 40 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division. In July 1915 the Division landed at Mudros, then moved to the Gallipoli peninsula. After evacuation in January 1916, the Division was sent to Egypt, before heading through Suez on 14 February 1916, arriving at Basra on 28 February 1916. The 8th RWF was then involved in the bitter campaign against the Turkish army in Mesopotamia. The Battalion fought on throughout April 1916, pushing the Turks back through Falahiyeh, Sannaiyat, Beit Aieesa and Abu Roman Mounds. They fought here for the remainder of the war, but Clifford took ill, and was sent to a Hospital in India, where he died on 25 September 1918, aged 21. Clifford is commemorated on the Kirkee Memorial, Poona, India.

 

David Rees Evans, Private, 368284, Royal Army Medical Corps. David was the second son of John Vaughan Evans and Margaret Jane Evans, of Murray House, Llanelli. He served with the 2nd Lowland Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, which was attached to the 52nd (Lowland) Division. After being evacuated from Gallipoli early in 1916, by April 1916, the Division had moved to Egypt, where it again saw action. It moved into Palestine early in 1917, and took part in the Palestinian Offensive, fighting at the Battles of Gaza, and taking part in the capture of Jerusalem. The Division received orders in March 1918 to proceed to the hard-pressed Western Front, where it then remained for the duration of the war. David was killed near Arras on 27 May 1918. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Ecoivres Military Cemetery, Mont-St-Eloi, France. His brother, Richard William Evans also fell.

Richard William Evans, Sapper, Royal Engineers. Richard was the eldest son of John Vaughan Evans and Margaret Jane Evans, of Murray House, Llanelli. He served with the Welsh Field Company, Royal Engineers, and died at home on 1 February 1916, aged 24. Richard is buried with his parents at Box Cemetery, Llanelli. He is not commemorated by the CWGC. His younger brother, David Rees Evans also fell.

Henry William Glover, Private, 12906, Welsh Regiment. Henry was the son of Richard Montague and Martha Glover, of 6, Greenfield Villas, Llanelli. At the outbreak of war he joined the 3rd Welsh, and was posted to France in March 1915, where he joined the 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 84 Brigade, 28th Division. Henry was killed a month later, during the Second Battle of Ypres, on 18 April 1915. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium.

David Alfred Hodges, Z/2750, Ordinary Seaman, Royal Naval Reserve. David was born on 17 February 1896, the son of Thomas and Mary Hodges, of 41, Robinson Street, Llanelli. He worked for the GWR at Llanelli prior to the war, and enlisted into the Royal Naval Reserve on 24 December 1915, training as a Wireless Operator. He was posted to Milford Haven, where he served as a Wireless Operator aboard HM Trawler Imelda, which had been requisitioned by the Admiralty for use as a minesweeper. David survived the war, but died of tuberculosis on 3 June 1919, aged 23. He is buried with his parents at Box Cemetery, Llanelli. His details were passed to the CWGC by myself on 6 February 2013, and he has finally been accepted for commemoration by them on Friday 5 July 2013, after almost 94 years of being forgotten. David will be temporarily commemorated on the UK Book of Remembrance at Maidenhead, Berkshire, until the location of his grave can be verified.

Jeremiah Christmas Jenkins, Private, 32899, Welsh Regiment. Jeremiah was the son of Hector and Margaret Jenkins, of 6, Talbot Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Pembroke into the 8th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the Pioneer Battalion to the 13th (Western) Division. On 13 June 1915 the Division sailed for Alexandria, and moved to Mudros before being landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli from 6 July 1915, relieving the 29th Division. Jeremiah was killed here during the Battle of Sari Bair, on 8 August 1915. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Walter Jennings, Lance Bombardier, 156056, Royal Garrison Artillery. Walter was the son of John and Annie Jennings, of Llanelli. He married Lottie L. Davies at Chester in June 1913, and they lived at 57, Parkgate Road, Chester. Walter then enlisted at Pontypool into the Royal Garrison Artillery, and served in France with the 510th Siege Battery, RGA. Walter took ill while in France, and returned home, but sadly died on 27 February 1918, aged 39. He is buried with his parents at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

Richard Walter Johnson, Private, 3728, Welsh Regiment. Richard was the son of John and Elizabeth Johnson, of 1, Catherine Street, Llanelli. He married Emily Evans in 1913, and the couple set up home at of 2, Arthur Street, Llanelli, where they had two children. Richard worked at the Pemberton Tinplate Works prior to the war, and enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Richard was wounded within weeks of the landing, and died aboard a hospital ship on 9 September 1915. Richard was buried at sea two days later, so is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

Sydney Jones, Private, 227535, Monmouthshire Regiment. Sydney was the son of Thomas and Francis Jones, of 25, Upper William Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli on 15 February 1916 into the Monmouthshire Regiment, and landed in France on 16 June 1917. Sydney was then posted to the 6th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to the 25th Division, as divisional pioneers. The division was at Messines, and took part in the famous Battle of Messines during June and July 1917. Sydney was killed there on 19 July 1917, aged 25. He is buried at Dickebusch New Military Cemetery Extension, Belgium.

Thomas H Jones, Sergeant, 25214, Royal Flying Corps. Thomas was from Llanelli, and served with 18 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. On 22 September 1916 he was flying as an observer in FE2b, Serial 6937, which was piloted by Lieutenant F. Hewson, when their aeroplane was attacked by German fighters, and shot down over Ervillers. Thomas was seriously wounded and taken prisoner by the Germans, but died in Hospital at Cambrai on 29 September 1916, as a POW. He is buried at St. Souplet British Cemetery, France.

Frederick James Lewis, Private, 201636, South Wales Borderers. Frederick was the son of John Perkin and Mary Jane Lewis. He enlisted at Brecon into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to the Brecknock Battalion, SWB, which was a Garrison unit, attached to the 5th (Mhow) Division. Frederick became ill and died in India on 22 October 1918. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Kirkee 1914-1918 Memorial, India.

John Henry Lewis, Private, PLY/17563, Royal Marine Light Infantry. John was born on 25 April 1896, the son of Mary E. Lewis. The family later resided at 19, Rice Street, Llanelli. He enlisted into the Royal Marines on 9 November 1914, and joined the 2nd Royal Marine Battalion at Gallipoli on 5 October 1915, where it was attached to the Royal Naval Division. They were transferred from the authority of the Admiralty to the War Office on 29 April 1916, and was redesignated the 63rd (Royal Naval) Division on 19 July 1916. The Division moved to France, arriving at Marseilles between 12 and 23 May 1916 and moved to positions on the Somme, where it took part in the Battle of the Ancre, and the resulting Operations on the Ancre. John was killed in Action here on 20 February 1917, aged 20. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

William Richards Morris, Private, 293147, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. William was the son of James and Mary Morris, of 15, Wern Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli on 3 June 1915 into the 3/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and sailed for Gallipoli in September, joining the 1/4th Welsh. William was evacuated from Gallipoli with dysentery in November 1915, and returned to Britain. He remained on home service until 13 February 1917, when he sailed for the Mediterranean, joining the 7th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. William saw action in Syria with the division, before taking ill with dysentery, and died in hospital on 2 December 1918, aged 23. He is buried at Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Wyndham Phillips, Private, 26813, Welsh Regiment. Wyndham was the son of John and Charlotte Phillips of Abercarn. He married Margaret Ann Edwards after moving to Llanelli to work as a Tinplater in 1900, and the couple resided at 8, Lakefield Road, Llanelli. He was the father of three children. Wyndham enlisted at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, and moved to France with the Division in July 1915. The Division saw its first action during the opening assault of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915, and it was on that day that Wyndham fell, struck by German shrapnel. He was 37 years old, and is buried at Brown's Road Military Cemetery, Festubert, France.

William Bertram Protheroe, Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps. William was born in Garnant in 1891, the son of William and Elizabeth Protheroe, and the family then moved to Delfan, Gilbert Crescent, Llanelli. He was commissioned into the 15th Welsh, the Carmarthen Pals battalion, on 3 April 1915. He landed in France with elements of the battalion on 4 December 1915, and served with the battalion until after the fighting at Mametz Wood, when he volunteered for service with the Royal Flying Corps. William gained his Pilots wings, and was promoted to Lieutenant, joining 53 Squadron, RFC in France. At 02.20 on the morning of 12 June 1917, William and his Observer, Lieutenant W. Turnbull, were flying a Photographic Reconnaissance mission over Oostaverne in their FE2b, Serial A4207, when they were spotted by Vzfw Wittekind of Jasta 28, which was commanded by Ritter Max Von Muller. The FE2b was easily out-manoeuvred by the superior German Albatross fighter, and was shot down in flames, killing both men. The bodies of William and his Observer were burnt in the wreckage, and they are commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial, France.

William Whitehouse, Private, 15735, Worcestershire Regiment. William was born at West Bromwich, the son of William and Sarah Ann Whitehouse. The family later moved to Havard Road, Llanelli, and he enlisted there on 4 September 1914 into the 10th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, which was attached to 57 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division crossed to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos. William sadly became ill with fever, and died here soon after, on 6 August 1915. He was just 19 years old, and is buried at Merville Communal Cemetery, France.

DONATIONS. If you find this website of use, please think about donating to help cover the costs of the huge amount of work and the continual costs of keeping the website on-line. Donations can be made using the Paypal link below, or by contacting the author via the Contact page.

Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

Get social with us.

Print Print | Sitemap
Copyright © 2003-2016 West Wales War Memorial Project