West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llanelli (Old Castle Tinplate) Memorial

The Old Castle Iron and Tinplate Company Limited (later known as the Old Castle Tinplate Company) was formed in 1866 by Joseph Mayburry, Henry Thomas, W. Rosser and Captain Samuel. The works were erected on a site called Hen Castell from which the company took its name. By the outbreak of the Great War there were eleven mills on the site, and with a huge workforce, the works supplied many members of staff to the armed forces, and with such a large number of its men going to war, there were inevitably heavy casualties. After the armistice, the works commissioned a war memorial to commemorate its fallen, and after the closure of the works, this memorial was taken under the care of the Kidwelly Industrial Museum, which incidentally has one of the original Old Castle buildings at its location at Kidwelly. Many thanks to Les Nixon for obtaining the photographs of the memorial for use on the website, and to the staff of the Museum, which is run by Carmarthenshire County Council, for allowing access to photograph it. 

Employees Who Fell in the Great War, 1914-18

Albert Didymus Beynon, Private, 13165, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Albert was the son of Evan and Margaret Ann Beynon, of 72, Pembrey Road, Llanelli. He was a fine athlete, having played full back for the Scarlets prior to the war; he was also an accomplished cricketer. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which moved to France in June 1915 attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division saw its first action during the opening assault of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915, and it was here that Albert was killed, when he was struck by shrapnel in the head. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 50-52 of the Loos Memorial, France.

William Henry Bodman, Private, 8510, Royal Irish Regiment. William was the son of William and Sarah Ann Bodman, of 134, Old Castle Road, Llanelli. He was a Tinplater prior to the war, and enlisted at Llanelli into the Hussars on 30 August 1914. He embarked for France on 22 June 1915 to join the 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Regiment, which was attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division. William then fought at the Battle of Loos in September, and moved with his Battalion to the Somme in July 1916. He was killed there at the Battle of Delville Wood on 3 September 1916, aged 24. William is buried at Delville Wood Cemetery, Longueval, France.

Cadwaladr Davies, Private, 201586, South Wales Borderers. Cadwaladr had been born at Lampeter, the son of John and Hannah Davies. The family lived at Nantcwnlle for several years before moving to Llanelli. Cadwaladr enlisted at Brecon into the 6th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was the Pioneer Battalion to the 25th Division. The Division moved to France in September 1915 and took the line at Vimy Ridge. It fought on the Somme in 1916, and at Messines and Pilckem in 1917. It was used to plug a gap in the line near Arras during the German Offensive of March 1918 before being moved to positions near Ploegsteert, where it faced the German Offensive on the Lys in April 1918. After suffering heavy losses, the Division moved to Soissons to rest, but were hit by another German offensive there in May. Now decimated, the Division returned to England to rebuild, before moving back to France at the end of August 1918. Cadwaladr was wounded soon after, and died of his wounds on 27 August 1918, aged 22. He is buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France, in Grave II.E.19.

Gwilym Arthur Davies, Private, 658, Welsh Guards. Gwilym was the son of Arthur and Mary White, of Swansea Road, Llanelli. He worked as a Blackplate Roller, and had formerly served in the Grenadier Guards, before transferring to the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards upon its formation in 1915, and moved to France with in August 1915 where the Welsh Guards joined 3 Guards Brigade, Guards Division. The new Division saw its first action at the Battle of Loos in September 1915, and fought in the area over the winter. It moved to the Somme in August 1916, and took part in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. Gwilym was killed here on 10 September 1916, aged 23. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 7D of the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Robert Davies, Private, 14142, South Wales Borderers. Robert was the son of William and Catherine Davies, of 38, Island Place, Llanelli. Bob was a behinder at the Old Castle Works, and was a well known Llanelli rugby player. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 4th Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was attached to 40 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division, and landed at Gallipoli from 6 July 1915, at Cape Helles, relieving the 29th Division. They left and returned to Mudros at the end of the month, and the entire Division landed at ANZAC Cove between 3 and 5 August, 1915, taking part in the Battle of Sari Bair. Robert was killed here on 13 August 1915. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Hill 60 Cemetery, Gallipoli.  Robert is shown as Royal Welsh Fusiliers on the Memorial.

Thomas Evans, Private, 12866, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of Daniel and Mary Evans, of 40, Princess Street, Llanelli. He worked as a Behinder prior to enlisting at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion moved to France in July 1915 as part of 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division fought at the Battle of Loos in September 1915, and moved to the Somme the following year, where it assaulted La Boiselle on 3 July 1916. Thomas was killed that day, aged 27. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 4A of the Thiepval Memorial, France.

William John Griffiths, Gunner, W/5476, Royal Field Artillery. William was the son of Lewis and Elizabeth Anne Griffiths, of Stepney Road, Pwll. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Welsh Divisional Artillery. He was then posted to France with B Battery, 107th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 24th Division. William was killed during the Battle of Messines on 14 June 1917, aged 29. He is buried at Railway Dugouts Burial Ground, Belgium. The memorial shows him as having served with the 15th Welsh, however, the memorial is incorrect, as a newspaper clipping confirms that he was in fact serving with the Royal Artillery. His brother, Trevor Griffiths, also fell, and is commemorated at Burry Port.

Arthur Hearn, Lance Corporal, 20418, Welsh Regiment. Arthur was the Son of Thomas and Mary Hearn, of Castle Street, Northam, Devon. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the Carmarthen Pals, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. Arthur landed in France with the Battalion in December 1915, where it trained in the line near Fleurbaix. In June 1916 the 38th Division made the long march south to the Somme, where on 7 July 1916 it assaulted Mametz Wood. The initial assault was called off after heavy casualties, and a fresh attempt was made on 10 July. Over the next 48 hours, the Welshmen were embroiled in a titanic struggle in the wood, which fell on the night of 11/12 July 1916. Arthur was killed in the Wood on 11 July 1916. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 7A-10A of the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Charles Hudson MM, Sergeant, 40526, South Wales Borderers. Charles was the son of Police Constable William Hudson and his wife Mary, of 1, Chaudos Street, Southampton. He was working in Swansea by 1911, before moving to Llanelli to work as a Tinworker. He married Margaret Ann Parry at Kilgerran on 9 March 1913, and the following year their daughter Mary Edna was born. Charles enlisted at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, but was later transferred to the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which had moved to the Western Front in 1916 after fighting in China and at Gallipoli, as part of 87 Brigade, 29th Division. The 2nd SWB suffered heavy losses on the Somme in 1916. In the spring of 1917 they fought at the Battle of the Scarpe, which was part of the Arras Offensive, and then moved further north to Ypres. Here they fought at the Battle of Langemarck, and then at the Battles of the Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde and Poelcappelle, before moving to Cambrai. Here they fought at the Battle of Cambrai in November and December, 1917 before moving back to Flanders early in 1918. The German Spring Offensive hit the British on the Somme on 21 March, 1918, and hit in Flanders just weeks later. Charles was killed at the Battle of Estaires on 11 April 1918, aged 33. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on Panel 5 of the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium. He was the holder of the Military Medal, for Bravery in the Field.

William John James, Lance Corporal, 20466, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of John and Mary James, of Upper Mill, Llanelli. He was employed at the Old Castle Works prior to enlisting at Llanelli into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which became known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion. William then transferred into the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to France in December 1915, and took up positions near Fleurbaix, where the men were initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. William was killed during the initial assault on Mametz Wood that day. He was 18 years old and is buried at Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz, France.

Robert Jones, Private, T/R/4/79292, Welsh Regiment. Robert was the son of Robert and Emily Jones, of Stradey Road, Furnace. He had married Annie Mary Lewis, of 3, Lake View, Furnace prior to enlisting at Carmarthen into the 53rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was part of 14th Reserve Brigade. Robert died on home service at Kinmel Park on 16 October 1918, aged 18. He is buried at Llanelli (Box) Cemetery.

Thomas David Rees Jones, Private, 4039, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at Rhymney in 1895, and lived with his uncle and aunt, William and Mary Thomas, at King's Square, Llanelli by 1911. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion (Carmarthen), Welsh Regiment, and embarked with the Battalion for Gallipoli, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division in July 1915. The Division landed at Gallipoli on 9 August 1915 and was immediately lunged into heavy fighting against strongly entrenched Turkish positions. Thomas was killed here on 10 August 1915 during the attack on Scimitar Hill. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 140-144 of the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Gwilym Trevor Jones, MM and Bar, Private, 13367, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Trevor was the son of William John and Elizabeth Jones, of 8, Cilwrfa Row, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division crossed to France between 11 and 21 July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozieres and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved north to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, and fought at the Battle of the Menin Road. Trevor was killed here on 31 July 1917. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 22 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. During his time at war, Trevor gained the award of the Military Medal twice for his bravery.

Thomas John Jones, Private, 25228, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Sarah Jones, of 53, Old Castle Road, Llanelli. He worked as a Behinder at the Old Castle Works, and enlisted at Llanelli into the Welsh Regiment. He was then posted to the 12th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France between the 1st and 9th June, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March, 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. Thomas was killed here on 25 November 1917, aged 25. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on Panel 5 of the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Thomas James Lewis, Private, 3045, Welsh Guards. Thomas was the son of Henry and Mary Ann Lewis, of 10, West End, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Welsh Guards, which had been formed on 26 February 1915. Thomas was posted to France, where he joined the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards, which was attached to the 3rd Guards Brigade, Guards Division. The Division had its first major action at the Battle of Loos in September 1915, and in 1916 fought at the Battle of the Somme. They remained here for the winter, and in March 1917 took part in the advance caused by the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line. Later that year they moved north to Ypres, where they fought at the Battle of the Pilkem, and then at the Battle of the Menin Road, Battle of Poelcapelle and the First Battle of Passchendaele. Thomas was killed at Passchendaele on 12 October 1917. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. A letter sent home to his mother stated that he had been given a proper burial by his comrades, and that a cross had been placed on his grave.

Thomas James Lewis, Private, 509, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Joseph and Ann Lewis, of Brynhawddgar, Mynyddcerrig, Pontyberem. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was formed during August, 1914 in Carmarthen. The Battalion were then attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, and in July, 1915 sailed from Devonport for Egypt. On 9 August 1915 the Division had moved from Egypt, and landed on Gallipoli. The next few days were chaotic, with small scale battles raging around the Peninsula, and Thomas was killed in action on 12 August 1915. He was 23 years old, and is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

David James Mason, Private, 201348, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of Edwin and Ann Mason, of 10, Cambrian Place, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion (Carmarthen), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Gallipoli on 9 August 1915 and suffered terrible casualties over the coming months there. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, and in early 1917 moved into Palestine, where they remained for the duration of the war, fighting at the Battles of Gaza, and successfully capturing Jerusalem. David was killed during the capture of Jerusalem, on 3 November 1917, aged 24. He is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel, in Grave C.22.

David John Morgan, Lance Corporal, 20793, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of Hugh and Charlotte Morgan, of the Old Castle Works, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli on 17 March 1915 into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals, and was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. David landed in France with the Battalion on 2 December 1915, and saw action at Fleurbaix with them, before the 38th Division marched to the Somme in June 1916. He was wounded by a bullet which fractured his skull during the Divisions assault on Mametz Wood on 10 July 1916, and evacuated to the King George Hospital in London for treatment. David died of his wounds there on 27 July 1916, aged 30 and is buried at Llanelli (Box) Cemetery.

David Reginald Morgan, Private, 20581, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of Daniel and Eliza Ann Morgan, of 4, Woodend Road, Llanelli. He worked as a greaser at the Old Castle Works, and enlisted at Llanelli into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. David landed in France with the battalion on 2 December 1915, and moved to positions at Fleurbaix, where the Welshmen were initiated into trench warfare. The 38th Division then took the line at Pont Du Hem, and it was here that David was killed, when the 15th Welsh sent a Platoon to reinforce the 14th Welsh on 9 May 1916. David was just 19 years old, and is buried at Cambrin Churchyard Extension, France, in Grave J. 37.

Thomas Morgan, Private, 45060, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was the son of Jonathan and Maria Morgan, of 157, Old Castle Road, Llanelli. He had enlisted at Carmarthen into the 7th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. The Division moved to France in September 1915, but the following month entrained for Marseilles, where it embarked for Salonika. It remained there for the duration of the war. Thomas was wounded in Salonika, and died as a result on 6 February 1918, aged 26. He is buried at Sarigol Military Cemetery, Kriston, Greece, in Grave D. 625.

David Morris, Private, 21008, Welsh Regiment. David was born at Llanelli, and had enlisted there into the 15th Welsh. Probably due to his stature, he was posted to the 18th Battalion (2nd Glamorgan), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France between the 1st and 9th June, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March, 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. David was wounded during the following advance, and evacuated to the Base Hospital at Rouen, where he died of his wounds on 23 April 1917. He is buried at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France, in Grave O. IX. B. 2.

Benjamin Phillips, Private, 54113, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin was the son of John and Mary Ann Phillips, of 13, Stradey Road, Furnace, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 17th Battalion (1st Glamorgan), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France between the 1st and 9th June, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March, 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. Benjamin was wounded about this time, and was evacuated to Doullens for treatment. He died of his wounds on 4 November 1917, aged 23, and is buried at Doullens Communal Cemetery Extension No. 1, France, in Grave V. D. 45.

Wyndham Phillips, Private, 26813, Welsh Regiment. Wyndham was the son of John and Charlotte Phillips of Abercarn. He married Margaret Ann Edwards after moving to Llanelli to work as a Tinplater in 1900, and the couple resided at 8, Lakefield Road, Llanelli. He was the father of three children. Wyndham enlisted at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, and moved to France with the Division in July 1915. The Division saw its first action during the opening assault of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915, and it was on that day that Wyndham fell, struck by German shrapnel. He was 37 years old, and is buried at Brown's Road Military Cemetery, Festubert, France, in Grave I. E. 5.

Ivor Guest Rees, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Ivor was the son of William and Annie Rees, of 5, Goring Terrace, Llanelli. He had worked as a Clerk at The Old Castle Works and at Buckley’s Brewery before being commissioned into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The Battalion was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, and moved to France during July 1915, fighting at Loos in September that year. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. Ivor was wounded here, and evacuated to the Base Hospital at Rouen for treatment, but sadly died of his wounds there on 5 August 1916, aged 24. He is buried at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France, in Grave A. 7. 3. His brother, Vivian Guest Rees was also killed.

Stanley Richards, Private, 126133, Machine Gun Corps. Stanley was the son of James and Elizabeth Richards, of 37, Brynmor Road, Llanelli. He originally enlisted at Llanelli into the Welsh Regiment, but was later posted to the 32nd Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, which was attached to the 32nd Division. At the end of December, 1915 the Division was in France, and the following year took part in the opening of the Somme Offensive, fighting at the Battle of Albert, the Battle of Bazentin, the Battle of the Ancre and the resulting Operations on the Ancre. They remained here over the winter, and in March 1917 followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line. Their next major action was during the First Battle of Arras, after the Germans had launched their Spring Offensive on 21 March 1918. They then moved south, and took part in the Battle of Amiens, and when the war had turned after the epic Australian success at Villers Brettoneux on 8 August, took part in the Battle of Albert on 21 August. From here on the Allies were on the offensive, and the Division fought at the Battle of Bapaume, then at the Battle of the St Quentin Canal. The once impregnable Hindenburg Line was then broken, and the Division took part in the Battle of Beaurevoir, and the Battle of the Sambre, where they fought the Passage of the Sambre-Oise Canal. Stanley was killed just two days before the Armistice, on 9 November 1918, aged 19. He is buried at Maubege-Centre Cemetery, France, in Grave D.65.

William John Stroud, Private, 4164, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of Thomas and Mary Jane Stroud, of 5, Corporation Avenue, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion (Carmarthen), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The 53rd (Welsh) Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July, 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here the Division was immediately thrown into action, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. William was killed here on 19 August 1915, aged 20. He is commemorated on Panels 140-144 of the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Edward Thomas, Private, 28582, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Edward was the son of William Comyer Thomas and Ann Thomas, of Thomas Street, Llanelli. He had originally enlisted at Llanelli into the Welsh Regiment, but was later posted to the 7th Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, which was attached to 49 Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division. During December, 1915 the Division moved to France and concentrated in the Bethune area. They saw their first major action during the Somme Offensive, at the Battle of Guillemont, Edward was killed here on 9 September 1916, aged 47. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 4D and 5B of the Thiepval Memorial, France.

William Thomas, Private, 4476, Welsh Regiment. William lived at King’s Square, Llanelli, and enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion (Carmarthen), Welsh Regiment. The battalion was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, and moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July 1915. They arrived at Mudros by 5 August 1915, and from there moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here the Division was immediately thrown into action, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. William was killed here on 10 August 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 140-144 of the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Jenkin Williams, Private, 31771, Welsh Regiment. Jenkin was the son of Philip and Jane Williams, of Cornish Arms, Llanelli. He married Elizabeth Hood, a fellow Tinworker, of 89, Sandy Road, Llanelli in 1915. Jenkin enlisted at Llanelli into the army, and was posted to the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division had been in France since July 1915 and had fought at Loos that year. In 1916 it fought through the Somme Offensive, and in 1917 fought at Messines and Passchendaele. In the spring of 1918 it was stationed near St. Quentin when the German Offensive hit the area, causing many casualties among the men of the Division. It was then posted to Flanders to rest, but was hit here by a fresh offensive on the Lys, and it was here, during the Battle of Kemmel, that Jenkin was killed on 29 April 1918. He was 26 years old, and is buried at White House Cemetery, Belgium, in Grave IV. A. 54.

Sydney Williams, Corporal, 13163, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Sydney was the son of David and Jane Williams, of 5, Park View Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was part of 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division crossed to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, form where they fought during the opening attack of the Battle of Loos, on 25 September 1915. Sydney was wounded at Loos, and brought back to the UK for treatment, but sadly died of wounds at Suffolk on 20 October 1915. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Felinfoel (Adulam) Baptist Burial Ground.

Thomas Sidney Williams, Private, 203543, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the Son of Martin and Margaret Ann Williams, of 4, Swansea Road, Llanelli. He had enlisted at Carmarthen into the army, and after raining was sent to France where he joined the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, known as the Carmarthen Pals. The battalion had been in France since December 1915 as part of 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division, and had seen action in Flanders before fighting on the Somme at Mametz Wood in 1916. In 1917 it had fought at Pilckem Ridge and Langemarck during the Passchendaele Offensive, before moving to positions near Armentieres for the winter. In March 1918 the Germans launched a massive attack on the British lines in front of the old Somme battlefields, and drove the British back along a narrow front as far as Albert. The 38th Division was sent to Albert at the end of the month to consolidate the line north of Albert at Aveluy Wood. On 10 May 1918 the 15th Welsh assaulted the wood under a concentrated artillery barrage. Due to a mistake, the artillery fell on the Welshmen, inflicting heavy casualties. Thomas was one of many killed that day by friendly fire. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 49 of the Pozieres Memorial, France.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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