West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llwynhendy War Memorial

Llwynhendy is a village sited on the edge of Llanelli, with a population of just over 4,000 people. It is bordered by Bynea, Pemberton and the Bryn, and is an old village with strong industrial roots, with the now closed steel-works in Bynea being a major employer during the time of the Great War. I do not possess photographs of the War Memorials in the area, and so the role of honour for Llwynhendy is taken from the 1922 published Carmarthen County War Memorial Roll, and may be inaccurate. Also I have no details of any WW2 casualties from the village, so any photographs or extra information would be much appreciated, although I have added the men whose details with the CWGC show that they were from Llwynhendy. If anyone has any details of war memorials in any of the local chapels or in St. David’s Church in Llwynhendy, I would be most grateful.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

David Davies, Gunner, 82072, Royal Field Artillery. David was the son of David and Margaret Davies, of Inkerman Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Royal Artillery, and was posted to D Battery, 62nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 12th (Eastern) Division. The Division landed at Boulogne on 31 May 1915, and took over the line at Ploegsteert Wood. They then moved south and fought in the Battle of Loos, and the subsequent actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, and remained there until March 1916. By June they were in position at the Somme, and attacked Ovillers on 2 July 1916. They then fought at the later Battles of Pozieres and Le Transloy, and it was during the latter, that David was killed on 24 October 1916, aged 22. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Albert Llewellyn Edwards, Private, 39318, Essex Regiment. Albert was the son of Joseph and Jemima Edwards, of 110, Station Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the army, and was posted to the 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment, which was attached to 112 Brigade, 37th Division on 4 February 1918, after having spent most of the war with the 29th Division. During March 1918 the Division was at the Somme, and fought during the German Offensive, at the Battle of Albert. Albert was killed here on 23 August 1918. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Fillievres British Cemetery, France. Albert is commemorated at Nazareth Chapel, Llwynhendy.

Evan David Evans, Private, 61673, Welsh Regiment. Evan was the son of Rees and Jane Evans, of Gibson Terrace, Bynea, Llanelli. He enlisted at Cardiff into the army, and was posted to the 24th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 231 Brigade, 74th (Yeomanry) Division. Evan moved to the Western Front with the Battalion in May 1918, fresh from the campaign in Palestine. They then fought at the Second Battle of Bapaume during the great offensive, and fought in Flanders before returning to the Somme and fighting at the Battle of Epehy, as part of the offensive towards the Hindenburg Line. They then fought in the final advance in Artois, and it was during this period that Evan died, on 17 October 1918. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Lapugnoy Military Cemetery, France. He is commemorated by Special Memorial XI.C.4.

John Samuel Evans, Ordinary Seaman, Z/3781, Royal Navy. John was born on 24 May 1896, the son of Samuel and Mary Ann Evans, of Joiner's Cottage, Llwynhendy. He was a Tinworker prior to enlisting into the Royal Navy, and served aboard HMS Vanguard, which was a Battlecruiser, attached to the Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow. On 9 July 1917 Vanguard was at anchor at Scapa Flow, when she was ripped apart by a massive internal explosion, killing all aboard. John was 21 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated along his former shipmates on Panel 25 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

Thomas Daniel Evans, Private, 15578, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Mary Hannah Evans, of Cilymaenllwyd, 1, Station Road, Bynea. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 76 Brigade, and joined the 3rd Division in France in October 1915. The Division was in positions near Ypres over the winter of 1915-16, and it was there, during the Actions of The Bluff, that Thomas was wounded. He died of his wounds on 9 March 1916, aged 20, and is buried at Le Touquet-Paris Plage Communal Cemetery, France, in Grave II.B.3.

Thomas John Griffiths, Private, 20454, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of David and Sarah Griffiths, of Brodawel Cottage, Bynea. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals. The Battalion trained at Rhyl, until moving to Morn Hill Camp, Winchester in the summer of 1915, where it became part of 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 4 December 1915 the 15th Welsh landed in France, and the 38th Division assembled in Flanders, where it took the line near Fleurbaix, where it was initiated into trench warfare. In June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, where it captured Mametz Wood. It then moved to positions on the Canal Bank at Ypres, where it was to remain for the next twelve months. Thomas was wounded while the 15th Welsh were in the line at Boesinghe, and was evacuated to hospital for treatment. Sadly, he died of his wounds on 4 February 1917, aged 26, and is buried at Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery, France, in Grave I. C. 23.

Gwilym John Harries, Sergeant, 15031, Welsh Regiment. Gwilym was born at Llwynhendy in 1892, the son of William John and Ann Harries. He married Jessie Rees prior to 1911, and the couple resided at Loughor. Gwilym enlisted at Swansea into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division crossed to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July 1916, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozieres and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved north to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines. Gwilym was wounded at Messines, and died of his wounds on 28 May 1917. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France. Gwilym is not listed amongst the Llwynhendy men on the County War Memorial roll.

William Henry Hopkins, Private, 1885, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of David and Mary Hopkins of Bynea. His father died when he was young, and his mother remarried Thomas Williams, of 2, Pantyglien, Loughor. William enlisted at Gorseinon into the 1/6th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the Glamorgan Territorials, which moved to France in October 1914, where it became Pioneer Battalion to the 1st Division. William fought with the Division at the Battle of Loos in September 1915, and they remained in the area over the coming winter. William was sheltering in a dugout when the ventilation shaft got blocked, and he suffocated, on 21 February 1916. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Maroc British Cemetery, Grenay, France, in Grave I. A. 40.

Frank Ungoed Humphreys, Lance Corporal, 313097, Gordon Highlanders. Frank was the son of John Rees and Cassellah Humphreys, of Alwyn Hall, Llwynhendy, and enlisted at London into the 7th Battalion, Gordon Highlanders. The Battalion landed at Boulogne on 12 May 1915, and became attached to 153 Brigade, 51st (Highland) Division, moving to Ypres. The Division then fought at the Battle of Festubert, and the following year made a name for itself during the Battle of the Somme. The Division moved to Ypres in 1917, where it fought alongside the 38th (Welsh) Division during the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, and at Langemarck, before moving south to take part in the Battle of Cambrai. The Division remained in the area until 21 March 1918 when the enemy launched a huge attack on the fronts of Fifth and Third Armies, near Flesquières. Here they took part in the Battle of St Quentin, and the First Battle of Bapaume before being relieved, and moved to Bethune to rest. Unfortunately, the Germans launched a fresh offensive on the Lys on 9 April 1918 and the Highland Division was caught up in heavy fighting again, before being moved to Oppy near Arras, where it stayed until 11 July in a relatively quiet spell. When a third huge enemy attack opened in the area held by the thinly-stretched French Army south west of Rheims, the Division were sent south to assist. They saw several days of very heavy fighting at the Battle of the Tardenois. Frank was killed here on 30 July 1918, aged 19. He is buried at Marfaux British Cemetery, France, in Grave VI. A. 3.

Thomas James Humphreys, Private, 60429, Cheshire Regiment. Thomas was the son of James and Emily Humphreys, of Wellfield Terrace, Ferryside. He enlisted at Llanelli into the South Wales Borderers, but at some time transferred into the 1/4th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, part of 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division had moved to Gallipoli by 9 August 1915 and fought there through the terrible winter that year, suffering many casualties, before it was evacuated to Egypt in December. Here it moved to the Palestinian front, and pushed the Turks North through the Sinai, towards Gaza. It was during the Third Battle of Gaza that Thomas was wounded. He was evacuated to Beersheba, but died of wounds there on 13 November 1917, aged 18. Thomas is buried in Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel. Many thanks to Avril Marks for the photograph.

Edgar Lewis James, Driver, W/1341, Royal Field Artillery. Edgar was born in Aberaeron in 1895, the son of Magdalen James, of Aeron Cottage. He worked for the Great Western Railway, at Llwynhendy and at Ammanford, and enlisted there into the Royal Field Artillery. He was posted to 'B' Battery, 119th Brigade, which was attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division. Edgar landed in France on 24 December 1915, and the Division spent its first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they famously captured Mametz Wood in July 1916. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Edgar was killed in action here on 28 May 1917. He was just 22 years old, and is buried at Dickebusch New Military Cemetery Extension, Belgium. He is also remembered on the GWR Memorial at Chester and at Nazareth Chapel, Llwynhendy.

Frederick Leyshon, Private, 14066, Welsh Regiment. Frederick was the son of David and Sarah Leyshon, of 4, Woodland Terrace, Bynea. He was educated alongside his cousins at Bynea, and joined the army at Llanelli, being posted to the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The Battalion was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, and landed in France during July 1915. It saw its first action during the Battle of Loos in September, and the following year moved to the Somme, where it took part in the opening stage of the offensive, capturing the village of Ovillers-La Boiselle. It remained on the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre Heights later in the year, and it was here, on 27 October 1916, that Frederick was killed. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 7A and 10A of the Thiepval Memorial, France. His cousins Gwilym and Thomas Leyshon also fell.

Gwilym John Leyshon, Private, 189, Welsh Guards. Gwilym was the son of Thomas and Ann Leyshon, of Glan-y-Mor, Bell View, Bynea. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Grenadier Guards, but when the Welsh Guards was formed after the Royal Warrant of 1915, transferred to its ranks. The 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards moved to France in the summer of 1915, joining 3rd Guards Brigade, Guards Division, and saw it’s first fighting at the Battle of Loos in September. In the summer of 1916 the Welsh Guards were on the Somme, and took part in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. Their next action was during the Battle of Morval, and it was there, on 26 September 1916, that Gwilym was wounded. He was evacuated to the Base Hospital at Étaples for treatment, but died there of his wounds on 26 September 1916. Gwilym was 24 years old, and is buried at Étaples Military Cemetery, France, in Grave XI.B.4. His brother Thomas and his cousin Frederick also fell. The photograph of Gwilym is courtesy of Chris Ryell.

Thomas Leyshon, Private, 14349, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Ann Leyshon, of Glan-y-Mor, Bell View, Bynea. He was employed at Glynea Colliery before the war, and enlisted at Llanelli into the 10th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the 1st Rhonddas. The Battalion formed in August 1914, and trained at Rhyl before moving to Morn Hill Camp, Winchester, where it became part of 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to France in December 1915, and took the line near Fleurbaix, where it was initiated into trench warfare. In June 1916 the Division moved south to the Somme, where it took part in the attack on Mametz Wood. The initial assault went in on July 1916, but it wasn’t until the early hours of 12 July that the wood fell to the Welshmen. Thomas was killed during the final hours of fighting within the wood, on 10 July 1916. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 7A and 10A of the Thiepval Memorial, France. His brother Gwilym and his cousin Frederick also fell. The photograph of Thomas is courtesy of Chris Ryell.

David Elias Morgans, Private, 72957, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. David was the son of David and Mary Morgans, of Garrde, Llwynhendy, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli, and was posted to the 25th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was the Montgomery and Welsh Horse Yeomanry Battalion, which was in Palestine attached to 231 Brigade, 74th (Yeomanry) Division. The Division ha moved into Palestine in March 1917, and fought at the Second and Third Battles of Gaza, before freeing Jerusalem from centuries of Turkish rule. Early in 1918 the Division carried out a series of military operations in the Jordan Valley, and it was there that David was wounded. He died of his wounds on 10 March 1918, aged 27, and is buried at Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel, in Grave F. 71.

Emrys Morris, Private, 19865, Royal Fusiliers. Emrys was born at Llanpumsaint, the son of Griffith and Margaret Morris. His father was the headmaster of the local school. The family later lived at Ardrum, Palace Avenue, Llanelli, following Griffith being offered the headship of Y Bryn School. Emrys enlisted at Swansea into the 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, which was known as the Bankers Battalion, attached to 124 Brigade, 41st Division. This Division was formed in September 1915, and moved to France by 6 May 1916, concentrating near Steenwerck, where they began familiarisation with trench warfare in the areas of Ploegsteert and the Douve valley, south of Ypres. Emrys was killed at Ploegsteert when he was shot whilst on sentry duty on 20 July 1916. He was 18 years old, and is buried at Berks Cemetery Extension, Belgium. He is commemorated at Nazareth Chapel, Llwynhendy.

William Henry Rees, Private, 48712, Northumberland Fusiliers. William was probably the son of David and Elizabeth Rees, of Tyrhitian, Felinfoel. He enlisted at Swansea into the South Wales Borderers, and later transferred into the 2nd Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers, which was attached to 84 Brigade, 28th Division. The Division formed in England from December 1914 from regular units returning from India, Singapore and Egypt. During January 1915 it moved to France, landing at Le Havre and moved to the Western Front, where it saw its first major action during the Second Battle of Ypres. Following serious casualties at Ypres, a Composite Brigade was formed, composing of the 2nd Battalion, the Buffs, 2nd Battalion, the Cheshires, 1st Battalion, the Welsh, and 1st Battalion, the York and Lancaster. It was dissolved on 19 May 1915, and the formation assumed its normal configuration, taking part in the Battle of Loos. During October 1915, the Division embarked at Marseilles, and proceeded to Egypt, and in November moved on to Salonika where the Division then remained. William was taken ill in the Middle East, and was taken to Hospital in Basra, where he sadly died on 11 July 1917, aged 26. He is buried at Basra War Cemetery, Iraq.

 

Thomas Granville Stephens, Private, 4271, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of John and Elizabeth Anne Stephens, of Brynmor, Llwynhendy. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Thomas was killed in action here during the Battle of Sari Bair, on 11 August 1915. He was just 21 years old, and is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli. Thomas does not seem to be commemorated locally.

 

Benjamin Thomas, Private, 24151, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin was the son of David and Sarah Thomas, of 2, Montana Place, Landore, Swansea. He must have lived at Llwynhendy prior to the war, and enlisted at Cardiff into the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the Cardiff City Battalion. The 16th Welsh trained at Rhyl until the summer of 1915 when it moved to Winchester, joining 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division, and moved to France in December 1915. The Division took the line near Fleurbaix, where it was initiated into trench warfare over the coming months, before marching south to the Somme in June 1916. Here, the Welsh Division was tasked with the capture of the formidable Mametz Wood, and on 7 July 1916 the 16th Welsh launched an assault on the wood, but came under enfilade machine gun fire, suffering heavy casualties. Benjamin was killed on that first charge into the wood on 7 July 1916. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 7A and 10A of the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Thomas Thomas, Captain, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of John and Mary Ann Thomas, of Stradey House, Llwynhendy, Llanelli. He was commissioned from the 14th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers into the 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the 2nd Rhondda Battalion, which was raised in August 1914, becoming attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division the following year. In December 1915 the Division moved to France, and took the line near Fleurbaix, where it was initiated into trench warfare. In June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, where it took part in the famous capture of Mametz Wood between 7 to 11 July. It was then moved north, to positions on the Canal Bank at Boesinghe, where it remained for the next twelve months. On 31 July 1917 the Division launched an attack on the Pilckem Ridge, capturing their objectives, with heavy loss of life. After a brief rest, the 13th Welsh moved back into the line on the Steenbeek, and it was here, on 23 August 1917, that Thomas was killed by German shellfire. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium, in Grave IV. F. 1.

William Edward Thomas, Private, 12043, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. William was the son of David and Ann Thomas, of Pen-y-graig, Llwynhendy. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 76 Brigade. On 27 September 1915 the 10th RWF landed in France, and weeks later joined 3rd Division. The Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the great offensive of 1 July 1916. William was killed six weeks into the battle, during the Battle of Guillemont, on 16 August 1916. He was 35 years old, and is commemorated on Pier and Face 4A of the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Bertie Tinnuche, Private, 14360, Welsh Regiment. Bertie was born at Llwynhendy, the son of Joseph and Mary Ann Tinnuche. The family later resided at Tadmor House, Bynea, Llanelli. Bertie enlisted at the outbreak of war into the Welsh Regiment, and was posted to the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, raised as the Cardiff City battalion, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to France during December 1915, and after several months in the line around Fleurbaix, moved to the Somme in June 1916, where they captured Mametz Wood. After heavy casualties at Mametz, the Division was moved via Hebuterne to positions at Boesinghe, north of Ypres, where they remained until launching their attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. Bertie was killed during a further attack by the 16th Welsh at Langemarck on 27 August 1917. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. Bertie is not listed amongst the Llwynhendy men on the County War Memorial roll.

Emrys Walters, Private, 68820, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Emrys was the son of William and Sarah Walters, of Danygraig, Bynea, Llanelli. He originally enlisted at Cardiff into the Army Service Corps, but was later posted to the 11th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. The Division crossed to France in early September 1915, but on 27 October 1915 embarked for Salonika. It remained here for the rest of the war, taking part in the retreat from Serbia during December 1915, and at the Battles of Doiran. Emrys was killed in Salonika on 6 May 1918, aged 26. He is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, Greece.

Daniel Rees Williams, Sapper, 145777, Royal Engineers. Daniel was the son of James and Margaret Williams, of Myrtle Cottage, Llwynhendy. He worked as a grocer prior to the war, when he enlisted into the Royal Engineers. Daniel served overseas for three years until being hospitalised in January 1919 after contracting influenza and pneumonia. Daniel recovered, but the war must have taken a toll on him, as he was found drowned in a pond by his brother and sister near to his house at Llwynhendy on Wednesday 7 May 1919. Nothing more is known of him, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Thomas Williams, Private, 28453, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at Llanelli, and enlisted there into the 18th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, The battalion was raised as the 2nd Glamorgan Battalion, and was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. . The Division moved to France between the 1st and 9th June, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. Thomas was killed on the Somme on 30 December 1916, and was buried at Priez Farm Cemetery, The cemetery was later destroyed by shellfire, and today Thomas is commemorated on a Special Memorial within Guards Cemetery, Combles, France.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Raymond Beresford Beard, Ordinary Signalman, D/JX 340158, Royal Navy. Raymond was the son of Francis Beresford Beard, and of Lucy Florence Beard, of Llwynhendy. He served with the Royal Navy aboard the Polish Destroyer Orkan. On 8 October 1943 Orkan was in the North Atlantic, forming part of the destroyer escort for Convoy SC-143, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-378, with the loss of 184 lives. Raymond was 20 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Cyril Davies, Corporal, 3976618, Welch Regiment. Cyril was the son of Robert and Jemima Davies. He served with the local Territorial unit, the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division had spent much of the war on home defence, in Northern Ireland and the south of England, before landing in Normandy towards the end of June 1944. The division then took part in the break out from the Normandy beach head and the drive through Belgium and Holland, and took part in Operation Market Garden and the Battle of the Bulge before entering Germany. Cyril was killed in Germany on 8 April 1945, aged 22. He is buried in Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany, and is commemorated on his parents’ grave at Soar Baptist Chapelyard, Llwynhendy. The photograph below has been kindly supplied by Robert Protheroe Jones.

Watkin Morgan Evans, Corporal, 765949, Army Catering Corps. Watkin was the son of Morgan H. and Mary Jane Evans, and the husband of Alice Evans, of Llwynhendy. He served with the Army Catering Corps, and was posted to North Africa where he became attached to a Royal Artillery unit. Watkin was killed on 21 April 1943, aged 36, and is buried at Massicault War Cemetery, Tunisia.

Irwyn Jenkins, Private, 3967775, Welch Regiment. Irwyn was born on 7 January 1920, the son of Thomas Samuel and Agnes Selina Jenkins, of 4, Penybanc, Llwynhendy. He served with the 2/5th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was the reserve battalion for the 5th Welch. Irwyn was badly wounded when a group of men from his battalion were being led on a supposed short cut across a minefield, after returning from exercises at Churcham Road, Kington by Sea, and died nine hours later, on 12 September 1941, aged 21. He was brought home for burial at Llwynhendy (Soar) Baptist Chapelyard. The photograph of Irwyn and of his grave have been kindly supplied by Robert Protheroe Jones.

Frank Wallis, Sergeant, 527572, Royal Air Force. Frank was the son of Edward and L. Wallis, of Manchester, and the husband of Elizabeth Jane Wallis, of Llwynhendy. He served with the Royal Air Force. Nothing more is presently known of Frank, but he died on active service on 5 June 1943, aged 25, and is buried at Manchester (Southern) Cemetery.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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