West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Newcastle Emlyn (Bethel Chapel) War Memorial

Bethel Calvinistic Methodist Chapel is situated in Church Street, Newcastle Emlyn. It closed its doors as a Chapel many years ago, and is now a Chapel of Rest, with a block of flats at the rear. The services are now held in the Vestry. The Chapel contains a war memorial tablet which commemorates its fallen members who fell during the Great War. The photograph of the memorial has been kindly supplied by Raymond Jones.

The Great War, 1914-1918

Edward David Evans, Acting Company Sergeant Major, 14401, Kings Shropshire Light Infantry. Ted was born in 1887, the son of Edward and Elizabeth Evans, of 15, Baker Street, Aberystwyth. Prior to the outbreak of war he had worked at the L C & M Bank in Newcastle Emlyn. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 7th Battalion, Kings Shropshire Light Infantry in September 1914 along with his close friend David Rees Davies. On 28 September 1915 the Battalion landed at Boulogne, joining 8 Brigade, 3rd Division at Meteren. The Division then moved to the Ploegsteert Wood sector, before moving to the Busseboom Sector at Ypres. The 7th KSLI took up positions in Sanctuary Wood, and fought at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. The Division was then moved south to the Somme, and fought there at the Battle of Albert. During an assault on the German trenches at Bazentin Ridge on 14 July 1916, Ted's company was caught on barbed wire and came under heavy fire from enemy machine guns. Ted was killed in action that day, aged 29, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. He had severely felt the death of his old friend Sergeant David Rees Davies, of Aberystwyth, who had enlisted at the same time and had been killed a few weeks earlier.

Thomas James Harries, Rifleman, 616, London Regiment. Thomas was the son of Police Sergeant William Harries and of Jane Harries, of Dryslwyn, Newcastle Emlyn. Thomas had lived with his Aunt Elizabeth Wheeler at 11, Cavendish Road, Harringay prior to the war and worked as a Clerk in the Registry Office, G.P.O., London. He enlisted there in September 1914 into the 5th Battalion (Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. In November 1914 the Battalion moved to France, landing at Le Havre. Here they joined 11 Brigade, 4th Division at Bailleul, and spent their first winter in the trenches at Ploegsteert Wood, where they took part in the famous Christmas Truce. They remained here throughout the coming months, and were in the front line when Thomas was shot in the head by a sniper. He died immediately that day, on 15 April 1915, aged just 20, and is buried in Rifle House Cemetery, Belgium, deep within the Wood.

Charles Robertson Morris, Lance Corporal, 18691, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Charles was born in Colwyn Bay in 1897, the son of Henry Charles and Marjorie Hunter Morris. His father was a Bank Manager, and by 1901 had moved the family to Newcastle Emlyn, when he took over the Metropolitan Bank. Charles was educated at Newcastle Emlyn Grammar School, and enlisted from school at Bangor on 7 December 1914 into the North Wales Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion was later numbered the 16th Battalion, and moved to France on 2 December 1915 attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. Charles fought with the division during the famous attack on Mametz Wood in July 1916, and in July and August 1917 fought at the Battle of Pilckem Ridge and the Battle of Langemarck. He was wounded at Langemarck on 2 August, suffering bullet wounds to his back, and shrapnel in his chest and lungs. He was brought back to England for treatment at Bangor Hospital, but never recovered from his wounds, and was discharged from the army on 2 May 1918. Charles continued to suffer, and died as a result of his wounds on 24 June 1920, aged 22. He is buried in Llanbeblig Public Cemetery, Carnarvon. His brother Robert also fell.

Robert Parry Morris, MC, Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. Robert was born in Colwyn Bay in 1892, the son of Henry Charles and Marjorie Hunter Morris. His father was a Bank Manager, and by 1901 had moved the family to Newcastle Emlyn, when he took over the Metropolitan Bank. Robert enlisted with his brother on 7 December 1914 into the North Wales Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. On 30 January 1915 he was commissioned into the 1/1st (Caernavonshire) Welsh Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Robert proved to be a brave man, and was soon promoted to Captain, and was awarded the Military Cross in the Birthday Honours list of 1917. Robert was killed in action at a position known as Manor Road, near Ypres on 27 October 1917, aged 23. He is buried at Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium. His brother Charles also fell.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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