West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Aberystwyth (St. Michael's Church) War Memorial

St. Michael's Parish at Aberystwyth was originally formed as an Anglican Church out of Llanbadarn Fawr. The church was rebuilt in 1792, and is located at Laura Place, Aberystwyth. Inside the Church are wooden memorial panels which contain the names of the men of the town who fell during both World Wars. These are the same names that are engraved on the main Castle War Memorial. To download a PDF sheet of this page with photographs inserted, please follow this link: Aberystwyth (St. Michael’s Church) War Memorial.

 

Aberystwyth Borough War Memorial, The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Joseph Ashworth, Private, 235132, Lancashire Fusiliers. Joseph was born in Manchester in 1890, the son of Joseph and Sarah Ashworth. His father was a lithographic printer, and had moved the family to Aberystwyth prior to the war, residing at 4, Southgate, Penparcau. Joseph had trained as a reporter with the Cambrian News before taking up employment with the Rochdale Times. Joseph enlisted at Rochdale into the 16th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers in November 1916 and left for France in the early part of February 1917, where it was attached to 96 Brigade, 32nd Division. He was killed in action 10 March 1917, on his first visit to the trenches. Joseph was 26 years old, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

 

Henry John Ballinger, Second Lieutenant, Monmouthshire Regiment. Henry was the son of John and Amy Amelia Ballinger, of Sherborne House, Aberystwyth. Educated at Cowbridge School and St. Paul's School, he enlisted at the outbreak of war into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Henry was commissioned on 22 April 1915 into the Monmouthshire Regiment, and went to France on 19 July 1915, where he was posted to the 1st Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment. The Battalion was attached to 84 Brigade, 28th Division, but on 3 September 1915 joined the 46th (North Midland) Division, as the Divisional Pioneer Battalion. On 13 October 1915, the Division was sent to attack the Hohenzollern Redoubt, at Loos, a maze of trenches, wire and fortifications, which had been the keystone of the German defences. During the fighting, the Monmouth's entered the German trenches, and whilst attempting to manoeuvre some captured German machine-guns into position, Henry was shot dead. The position was fought over intensively over the coming days, and as a result Henry has no known grave. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France.

 

Frank Bennision, Driver, 730160, Royal Field Artillery. Frank Bennison was born in Hoylake, the son of Francis and Sarah Ellen Bennison. Within three years of his birth the family had moved to 4, Northgate Street, Aberystwyth. A pre-war territorial in the Cardigan Battery he and his comrades in the battery were was amongst the first on 4 August 1914 to report for duty to the Drill Hall in Aberystwyth. The battery went overseas to Egypt in December 1915 and their first duty was to take over a section of the Suez Canal defences from the Australian Division at Beni Salama. At the end of 1916 the Cardigan Battery became part of the 267th Brigade RFA, 53rd (Welsh) Division. In 19 April 1917 the division was part of the British attempt to capture all defences west of Gaza. Frank was killed in action on 21 April 1917 during the Second Battle of Gaza. When returning to the battery from the rear positions, both he and his horse “Mr Tudor Jones’ chestnut, Goldfinch” were caught by artillery fire and were killed. Frank was the first of Cardigan Battery to be killed on active service since leaving the UK. He was 39 years old, and is buried in Gaza War Cemetery, Israel.

 

John Frederick Bird, Private, 76348, Royal Army Medical Corps. John was born in 1892, the son of Frederick and Kate Bird, of 7, South Road, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aldershot on 25 October 1915 and went to France in June 1916 with the 5th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps. The 5th FA was attached to the 2nd Division, and John would have treated many wounded men during the Battle of the Somme that year. In March 1917 the Division followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and in April they fought at Arras, during the First Battle of the Scarpe, the Battle of Arleux and the Third Battle of the Scarpe. Their next major action was at the Battle of Cambrai. The Division was still in the area when John was killed in action on 18 February 1918. He was 25 years old, and is buried in the British Extension of Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery, France.

 

Horace Blair, Private, 44155, South Wales Borderers. Horace was born in Newtown, Montgomeryshire in 1896, the son of George and Matilda Annie Blair. The family were residing at Aberystwyth prior to 1901, at 13, Penmaesglas Road. Horace married Annie Davies at Aberystwyth prior to enlisting into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment in Aberystwyth, and landed in France with them on 18 July 1915. The battalion moved to Loos attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, and took part in the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. At some time after this, Horace transferred to the 10th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. Horace was wounded at Mametz Wood in July 1916 but rejoined his regiment at Ypres, taking part in the capture of Pilkem Ridge. In March 1918 the Division moved south to the Somme, and took up positions north of Albert, facing the Ancre Valley. On 21 August 1918 the 38th (Welsh) Division launched its famous attack across the River, and in the coming days began their push across the old Somme battlefields. On 24 and 25 August Horace’s battalion met with resistance in the area around La Boisselle and Horace was wounded. He died of his wounds on 25 August 1918, aged 22, at 56 Casualty Clearing Station, and is buried in Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt, France.

 

Samuel Bluck, Gunner, 102692, Royal Garrison Artillery. Sam was born in 1885, the son of Samuel and Emma Bluck, of Cross Foxes, Mill Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth on 10 December 1915 into the Royal Artillery, and was posted to France with the 172nd Siege Battery on 25 July 1916. By November, Samuel had returned home sick, and after recovering was sent back out to France, joining the 321st Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery in June 1917. The Battery was at Ypres, and was firing preliminary 'softening-up' bombardments on the German lines when Samuel was killed by a shell splinter 25 June 1917. He was 32 years old, and is buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Thomas George Deane Burdett, MC, Captain, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was born at Rhyl on 15 February 1881, the son of George Deane Burdett and Claudia H. Deane Burdett. Claudia was from Aberystwyth, and Thomas was educated at Aberystwyth Grammar School, and at the University. He became a solicitor prior to the war, and was commissioned on 2 September 1914 into the 1/7th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion was attached to 158 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, and landed at Gallipoli on 9 August 1915. Here the Division was immediately thrown into action, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, then the ensuing Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, and in early 1917 moved into Palestine, where they remained for the duration of the war, fighting at the Battles of Gaza, and successfully capturing Jerusalem. Thomas was killed in action during the Third Battle of Gaza, on 6 November 1917. He was 36 years old, and is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel. He was awarded a posthumous MC which was presented to his mother by Lt Gen Pitcairn Campbell GOC Chief of Western Command in Chester.

 

Thomas A. Carbutt, Gunner, 190349, Royal Field Artillery. Tom was born at Manchester in 1881, the son of Thomas and Annie Carbutt, of Battlefield, Shrewsbury. Thomas married Mabel Elizabeth Lewis at Aberystwyth in 1916, and enlisted there into the Royal Field Artillery. Thomas seems to have served overseas, as the local newspapers reported that he had been twice wounded and gassed on the Western Front, before being attached to the 4th Reserve Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. He was home on leave when he died of pneumonia on 28 November 1918, aged 37, and was buried with full military honours in Aberystwyth Municipal Cemetery. His original grave marker is in the collection of the Aberystwyth Museum.

 

Thomas Cartwright, Bombardier, 730060, Royal Field Artillery. Tom was born in Market Drayton, Shropshire on 13 January 1884, the son of Henry and Evelyn Cartwright. He was a local postman and well known in Aberystwyth as a former player and secretary of Aberystwyth Town FC. Thomas married Edith Mary Banford at Aberystwyth in 1903. He was a pre-war territorial with the Cardigan Battery, and reported for duty at the Drill Hall in Aberystwyth on 4 August 1914. Following training and home duties the battery left for Egypt in December 1915 but soon after Tom returned home having completed his period of service. Later in 1916 Tom rejoined the army and was posted to the 85th Battery 11th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. During the Third Battle of Ypres he was severely wounded in the back and was taken to 61 Casualty Clearing Station where he died of his wounds on 7 October 1917, aged 32. Tom is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Robert Corfield, Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. Robert was born in 1887, the son of Elizabeth Corfield of 43 North Parade, Aberystwyth. He was a hairdresser prior to the war, and was a pre-war Territorial with the Cardigan Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Robert was mobilised at the outbreak of war, and moved with the Battery to Bedford. On 26 August 1915, the Battery was on manoeuvres when Robert fainted whilst sat on a gun carriage, and fell backwards, under the wheels. He received a broken jaw and depression to the back of the head, which killed him instantly. Robert was 27 years old, and was buried with full military honours in Aberystwyth Municipal Cemetery. Robert's case has just been submitted to the CWGC. (5 August 2012). On Friday 7 February 2014, Robert’s case has finally been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC, although they show him as being commemorated by the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance, he is definitely buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Albert Davies, Private, 38466, Gloucestershire Regiment. Albert was the adopted son of John and Mary Davies, 14, Glanrafon Terrace, Aberystwyth. He joined the South Wales Borderers Regiment in Brecon, but in 1918 was transferred to the 8th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, which was attached to 57 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division was stationed near Bapaume, and was hit here on 21 March 1918 by the German Spring offensive, suffering heavy casualties over the coming days, whilst fighting a brace rearguard action. The battered Division was transferred to the quieter sector at Messines, but was hit here by a renewed offensive the following month. Albert was killed at Messines on 18 April 1918, aged 19. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

 

David Davies, Private, 15886, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. David was born in Aberystwyth in 1881. He enlisted in Tonypandy into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The Division remained in the Givenchy area over the winter, and it was here that David was wounded. He died of wounds on 8 February 1916, aged 35 and is buried in St Venant Communal Cemetery, France.

 

David Edward Davies, Driver, 730230, Royal Field Artillery. David was born in 1885, the son of David and Mary Davies, of Llanbadarn Fawr. He served with 'A' Battery, 267th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. Little is known of David's war, but he would have served with the Division during the campaign in Palestine. He survived the hardships of war in the Middle East, but sadly died of pneumonia in hospital in Cairo on 4 December 1918. David was 34 years old, and is buried at Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

David John Brutus Davies, Bombardier, 86740, Canadian Field Artillery. David, better known to his friends as Brutus, was born on 27 March 1887, the son of Hannah Davies and was educated at the County School in Aberystwyth before serving as an apprentice fitter and turner at the Rheidol Foundry. In 1910 he emigrated to Canada where he settled in Saskatchewan with his wife Ada. A former territorial with the Cardigan Battery he enlisted at Winnipeg on 29 December 1914 into the 5th Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery. The battery moved to France in the spring of 1915, and took up positions at Ypres. The Canadians took part in several major actions during 1915, and after another engagement at Mount Sorrel in June 1916 moved to the Somme. Here the Canadians fought at the battle of Flers-Courcelette, and the ensuing Battle of Thiepval. On 3 November 1916, Brutus, along with thirteen men of his company, were all asleep in a trench near Pozieres, when they were killed in their sleep by a German shell. David was 29 years old, and is buried in Pozières British Cemetery, France.

 

David Rees Davies, Sergeant, 14400, Kings Shropshire Light Infantry. David was the son of Aberystwyth Councillor David Davies, and of Eliza Jane Davies, and was employed at Lloyds Bank. He played football for Aberystwyth Town FC at centre forward. David joined the 7th Battalion, Kings Shropshire Light Infantry along with his close friend Edward David Evans on the same day in September 1914. The battalion was attached to 76 Brigade, 25th Division, and landed at Boulogne on 28 September 1915. On 15 October 1915 the Brigade moved to the 3rd Division, and on 19 October 1915 the battalion transferred to 8 Brigade in the same Division. In 1915 the Division saw action at Bellewaarde and Hooge, and took part in the Second attack on Bellewaarde. In 1916 the Division fought at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. On 1 May 1916 David had volunteered to take up a forward position in the front line at Dickebusch. Sadly, the position was hit by shellfire, mortally wounding David. He died of his wounds that same day, before he could be taken to a dressing station. David was 23 years old, and is buried in La Clytte Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

George Henry Davies, DCM, Sergeant, 52064, Cheshire Regiment. George was born in Aberystwyth in 1889, the son of John and Margaret Davies, of Pembroke House. He was educated at the County School, before enlisting at Holborn, London on 16 February 1916 into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. George was posted to France on 16 July 1916, initially to join the 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, but was instead posted to the 13th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, which was attached to 74 Brigade, 25th Division. The battalion had suffered casualties during the attack on 3 July 1916 near Thiepval. The Division fought throughout the Battle of the Somme, and then moved to Ploegsteert, where it held the line for the months leading up the Battle of Messines in June 1917. George was killed in action by shellfire on 21 June 1917, just days after being awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for bravery. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

 

John Richard Davies, Private, 8546, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Richard, known locally as Dick, was the son of Richard and Sarah Davies, of 1, Penglais Road, Aberystwyth. Dick played football for Aberystwyth Town FC and was a local postman who had who had served in India for seven years as a regular soldier. At the outbreak of war, he rejoined his regiment, the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and embarked for France, where it was attached to 19 Infantry Brigade, under independent command. The Brigade took part in the retreat from Mons to the Marne, where John rescued a wounded comrade under heavy fire at La Ferte-sous-Jouarre. The BEF then headed for Ypres, where 19 Brigade became attached to the 6th Division, and fought at the First Battle of Ypres. On 31 May 1915 the Brigade transferred to the 27th Division, and three months later transferred to the 2nd Division, taking part in the Battle of Loos. The 2nd RWF suffered terrible casualties at Loos, and remained in the Cambrin sector over the winter. On 15 March 1916, John was with 'A' Company, which was in the front line at the Brickstacks, when he was killed by a German rifle grenade. He was 29 years old, and is buried in Cambrin Military Cemetery, France.

 

Robert Humphrey Davies, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Robert was born at Swansea in 1888, the son of the Reverend Evan William and Sarah Davies. Prior to the war he was a Student at Aberystwyth University, where he met and married his wife, Rosa Gwendoline Davies, and the couple set up home at Dolgoed, Elm Tree Avenue, Aberystwyth. Robert originally enlisted into the Royal Engineers Special Gas Company, and served in France from 14 September 1915. On 19 February 1918, Robert was commissioned into the 13th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. He joined the battalion prior to its move from Armentieres to the Somme, where the Division took up positions facing Aveluy Wood, north of Albert. Here they regained some ground in the coming weeks, before settling down for routine trench warfare, until the launching of the great offensive on 21 August 1918. The 13th RWF advanced across the River Ancre over the coming days, and saw heavy fighting. Robert was killed in action here on 23 August 1918. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Bouzincourt Ridge Cemetery, Albert, France.

 

John Austin Dawson, Private, 3664, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. John was born in Aberystwyth in 1895, the son of Charles and Sarah Dawson. He enlisted at Birmingham into the 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which was attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division. John joined the battalion in France on 27 May 1915, as a reinforcement after the Battle of Aubers Ridge. The Division then moved to positions at Loos, and on 25 September 1915 took part in the initial assault north of the Vermelles-Hulluch road, facing the Quarries and a series of strong-points. The Division suffered heavy casualties from gas and machine-gun fire, but successfully reached the Germans third line. John was killed that day. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France.

 

David Henry Doughton, Corporal, 40748, Canadian Field Artillery. David was born at Liverpool on 16 August 1884, the son of David and Elizabeth Doughton. His parents were from Aberystwyth, and had moved the family back there at some time after 1901. David married Elizabeth Alice Hughes in 1907, and in 1912 the couple migrated to Canada with David's parents, setting up home at Smith’s Falls, Ontario, where David worked as a Carpenter. On 19 August 1914 David enlisted at Valcartier into the 1st Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, and in late 1914 visited relatives in Aberystwyth after the Canadians had arrived in the UK. The first action of the Canadians was in the Second Battle of Ypres when, in a letter home, David described how on the 25 April 1915 he witnessed the first German gas attack on the French Algerians at s'Gravenstafel. David’s Division remained in the Ypres area until the summer of 1916 before going to the Somme, where it fought at Courcelette and Regina Trench. The following year David took part in the Battle of Vimy Ridge. Later that year the Division was back at Ypres, where the Canadians captured Passchendaele village. It was here, on 21 November 1917 that David was killed in action. He was 33 years old, and is buried at Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Alfred Thomas Edwards, Private, 27022, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Alfred was the son of John and Mary Edwards, of 10, Little Darkgate Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Holborn, London into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and was posted to France early in 1916, joining the 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division. The battalion was on the Somme, stationed near Fricourt, where two of its officers included Robert Graves and Siegfried Sassoon, two of the most famous war poets. The battalion took part in the 1 July 1916 assault at Fricourt towards Mametz Village; one of the few successes of the opening day of the battle. After the 38th Division had captured Mametz Wood, the 7th Division moved past towards High Wood. Alfred was killed at High Wood on 3 August 1916. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

 

David James Edwards, Gunner, 190346, Royal Field Artillery. David was born in Aberystwyth in 1883, the son of Evan and Anna Marie Edwards of 48, Cambria Street, Aberystwyth. Sometime before the start of the War, David had met and married Elizabeth Roberts, the daughter of Thomas and Mary Roberts, of Lower Gosport Street, Laugharne. In 1916, David was called up and became a Gunner in 'A' Battery, 296th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 59th (Second North Midland) Division. In April 1916, the Division moved to Ireland to help quell the Republican uprisings that were gathering momentum at the time, and took part in the fighting of the Easter uprising. In January 1917 the Division returned to England, before heading to France in February, moving to Ypres. David was part of the crew of a Gun Battery that took part in the shelling of the German Lines which marked the beginning of the Battle of the Menin Road, on 20 September 1917. After weeks of heavy fighting, the artillery was slowly moved forward, keeping pace with the slow advance of the infantry. David was wounded at the Battle of Polygon Wood, and was brought back to the Casualty Clearing Station at Dozinghem, where he died of his wounds on 29 September 1917, aged 33. David is buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

John Humphrey Edwards, Private, 19958, Royal Fusiliers. John was the son of John Humphrey Edwards and Mary Edwards, of Arlwyn, Llanbadarn Road, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Chester into the 26th (Bankers) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, which was attached to 124 Brigade, 41st Division. The Division moved to France by 6 May 1916, and began trench familiarisation in the Ploegsteert sector, south of Ypres. They remained here until August 1916, when they moved to the Somme, and took part in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. The Division remained in the line, pushing on to Courcelette over the next few days before coming out for a rest and re-fit. They then fought at the Battle of Le Transloy, before moving to positions south of Ypres in 1917. John was on guard duty at a junction in the trench on 1 May 1917, when a shell exploded nearby causing severe wounds from which he died that same day. He was 26 years of age and is buried at Dickebusch New Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

John Richard Edwards, Private, 53766, Cheshire Regiment. John was born in 1899, the son of Robert Edwards, of 4, Powell Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted on 2 March 1916 at Brecon into the Training Reserve Battalion, and was posted to France on 30 May 1918, joining the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, which was attached to 15 Brigade, 5th Division. On 14 August 1918, 5th Division was in GHQ Reserve, and two weeks later began its part in the famous advance to victory. The Division took part in the advance from Albert towards the Hindenburg Line, fighting through Irles, Beugny, Havrincourt, Gonnelieu and the River Selle, and finally into Valenciennes and the River Sambre. John was killed in action after being struck by shrapnel in an attack on a village on 23 October 1918. He was 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France.

 

William John Edwards, Gunner, 168353, Royal Field Artillery. William was the son of David and Ann Edwards, of 9, Spring Gardens, Aberystwyth. He left Aberystwyth with the Cardigan Battery, Royal Field Artillery in August 1914, but didn't get posted to France until 1916, after being transferred to the 124th Battery, 28th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 5th Division. William probably fought at the Battle of the Somme that year, and moved with the Division to Ypres the following year, where they took part in the Third Battle of Ypres. William was killed in action at Ypres on 5 August 1917, aged 23 and is buried in The Huts Cemetery, Belgium. In his last letter home he said that he had been recommended for the Meritorious Service Medal, but this was not a posthumous award, and so its award was never conferred.

 

Anwyl Ellis, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Anwyl was the son of David and Catherine Ellis of Aberystwyth. He had played football for Aberystwyth FC, prior to becoming professor of navigation at Glasgow University, and was a Royal Naval Reservist. At the outbreak of war, Anwyl was mobilised, joining the Motor Boat Reserve, and served aboard the Lady Lel. Anwyl became the first Aberystwyth casualty of the Great War when he was drowned when Lady Lel was lost in Loch Ewe on 18 November 1914. He was 36 years old, and is buried at Poolewe Old Burial Ground, Scotland. His brother, Ceredig, died later in the war.

 

Ceredig Ellis, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Ceredig was the youngest son of David and Catherine Ellis, of Aberystwyth. Ceredig was a partner in a millinery and drapery business at Aberystwyth prior to the war, and had played football for Aberystwyth FC. He enlisted into the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and whilst training at Colwyn Bay, met and married Mildred Cavanagh at Conwy in 1915, just prior to the battalions move to Winchester. The battalion was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 4 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. Ceredig had been commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the meantime, and joined the battalion at Cuinchy on 29 March 1916. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. Ceredig was wounded during the terrible fighting within the wood, and was evacuated to Abbeville, where he died of his wounds on 19 July 1916, aged 34. Ceredig is buried at Abbeville Communal Cemetery, France.

 

Arthur Evans, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Arthur was born on 26 February 1892, the son of John Evans, Broniarth, North Road, Aberystwyth, Coroner for North Cardiganshire and Deputy Town Clerk, and of Jane Evans (nee Jones). After leaving the County School he trained as an architect in Manchester but returned home at the outbreak of war to enlist into the Aberystwyth University OTC. Arthur was commissioned on 19 February 1915 into the 18th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was training at Porthcawl. On 31 March 1915, when out riding his motorbike with some fellow officers near Porthcawl he was thrown from his bike and died the same day in King Edward’s Hospital in Cardiff, aged 23. Arthur was buried in Aberystwyth Municipal Cemetery with full military honours.

 

Edward David Evans, Company Sergeant Major, 14401, Kings Shropshire Light Infantry. Ted was born in 1887, the son of Edward and Elizabeth Evans, of 15, Baker Street, Aberystwyth. Prior to the outbreak of war he had worked at the L C & M Bank in Newcastle Emlyn. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 7th Battalion, Kings Shropshire Light Infantry in September 1914 along with his close friend David Rees Davies. On 28 September 1915 the Battalion landed at Boulogne, joining 8 Brigade, 3rd Division at Meteren. The Division then moved to the Ploegsteert Wood sector, before moving to the Busseboom Sector at Ypres. The 7th KSLI took up positions in Sanctuary Wood, and fought at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. The Division was then moved south to the Somme, and fought there at the Battle of Albert. During an assault on the German trenches at Bazentin Ridge on 14 July 1916, Ted's company was caught on barbed wire and came under heavy fire from enemy machine guns. Ted was killed in action that day, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. He had severely felt the death of his old friend Sergeant David Rees Davies, of Aberystwyth, who had enlisted at the same time and had been killed a few weeks earlier.

 

Frederick George Evans, Seaman, 2127/D, Royal Naval Reserve. Fred was born at Aberystwyth in 1877, the son of Frederick George Evans and Annie Evans. He married in 1903, and resided with his wife, Susannah Evans, at 8, Poplar Row, Aberystwyth. Fred worked as a Boatman prior to the war, and was a member of the local Royal Naval Reserve in Aberystwyth. He left the town for Devonport on 4 August 1914 along with a number of other local men, who went on the serve on HMS Caesar. Fred took ill at Devonport, and on 15 February 1915 was discharged while serving with HMS Vivid and returned home due to ill health. He died at Aberystwyth Infirmary on 23 June 1915, aged 38. Fred was buried in Aberystwyth Municipal Cemetery with full military honours.

 

Hugh Evans, Sailor, Mercantile Marine. Hugh was born at Aberystwyth in 1866, the son of William and Mary Evans. He was a long serving seaman, and during the war served aboard the SS Don Diego, a London registered cargo steamer. On 21 May 1917, Don Diego was on route from Swansea to Alexandria, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-65. Hugh was 52 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

William Bailey Evans, Private, 39705, Welsh Regiment. William was born in 1896, the son of Captain William Evans of the Boar’s Head Hotel, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the Welsh Regiment, and was posted to France late in 1916, joining the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had been in France since December 1915, and had taken part in the bloody capture of Mametz Wood in July 1916. The battered Welshmen had moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal, where it remained until launching its attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. After the successful capture of its objectives, the Division was withdrawn to rest, but the 15th Welsh remained in the line, in support of the Battle of Langemarck. William was killed in action here on 4 August 1917, aged 21, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

 

David Henry Felix, Private, 33024, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of David and Margaret Felix, 4, Edge Hill Road, Aberystwyth. A loyal member of Tabernacle Chapel, he was educated at Alexandra Road School. David enlisted at Pontypridd into the Welsh Regiment, and was posted to France on 22 June 1915, joining the 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 84 Brigade, 28th Division. David joined the battalion during the tail end of the Second Battle of Ypres, and was posted to D Company. The battalion was  stationed in the Locre area when David was killed in action on 9 August 1915. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Cyril Mortimer Green, Captain, Royal Sussex Regiment. Cyril was the son of Thomas Mortimer Green and Catherine Green, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Gwendoline Mortimer Green, of 23, Southwood Court, Golder's Green, London. Cyril was a native of Denbigh, and had been educated at the University Colleges of Exeter, Carmarthen and Aberystwyth, along with his brother Hugh (see below), before being gazetted as Second Lieutenant into the 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment in October 1914. Cyril was an eminent and brilliant plant ecologist at University College London. He undertook a detailed survey of Borth bog near Aberystwyth and pursued his interest in Palestine sending back details of plants in that part of the world. Cyril served in France until he was severely wounded at Festubert on 9 May 1915, and returned home for treatment. Returning to the front, he was attached to the 16th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment, who were attached to 230 Brigade, 74th Division. The Division was taking part in the advance into Palestine, and had just successfully fought in the Third Battle of Gaza, when Cyril was killed in action on 6 November 1917. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel.

 

George Owen Green, Captain, Welsh Regiment. George was the son of Mr and Mrs James G Green of Panteg, Llanbadarn Road, Aberystwyth and the grandson of Alderman George Green, Mining Engineer. George’s brother, R. K. Green, was a notable rugby forward who served in the Royal Field Artillery during the war. Educated at Llandovery College from 1889 to 1895, George had married Elizabeth Ann Bevan and had gone to British Columbia where he worked as an Engineer in the gold mines. He also went to Canada to inspect mining property. George also held mining appointments as far afield as Russia and South America. They returned to Aberystwyth where George was prominent in many local societies including golf and St David’s Lodge of Freemasons. Sadly Eizabeth died in childbirth in September 1914, soon after arriving back home. At the end of 1914 George applied for a commission in the army and was duly commissioned into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment which was attached to the 58 Brigade, 19th Western Division, and landed in Le Havre in July 1915. George was in charge of a working party at Laventie when he was killed by a German sniper on 23 August 1915 and is buried Rue du Bacquerot No.1 Military Cemetery, Laventie France. He was 36 years old and the first officer of the regiment to die in France.

 

Hugh Mortimer Green, Captain, Welsh Regiment. Hugh was the son of Thomas Mortimer Green, former Registrar of Aberystwyth University, and Catherine Green, of Aberystwyth, and the Brother of Cyril Mortimer Green (see above). Hugh was educated at Carmarthen University along with Cyril, and was gazetted into the Welsh Regiment. He was posted to the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets. Hugh was killed in action on 10 August 1915, aged 32, at the Battle of Sari Bair (Attack on Scimitar Hill). He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Oswald Robert John Green, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Oswald was the son of William Arthur and Sophia Green of the Foundry, Aberystwyth, and the husband of Winifred Gwendoline Green, of Buchland House, Neath Abbey, Neath. George was educated at Jasper House and Aberystwyth University. He was a Holder of the Royal Humane Society Medal for life saving from drowning, and always to the fore in local sport, excelling swimming, cricket, golf and especially football. He was a successful captain of Aberystwyth Town Football Club prior to the war and spurned many offers to turn professional. A prominent trait was if any of the younger players was severely tackled, he always made a point of “protecting them”, a train of thought he was to take with him onto the battlefield. Oswald returned from America at the end of 1914 to take up a commission in the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July 1916, capturing the village at heavy cost. The 9th Welsh had played a big part in the taking of Ovillers, but Oswald had been mortally wounded. He died on 5 July 1916, aged 35, as a result of his wounds, and is buried at Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L'Abbe, France.

 

Samuel James Green, Private, 108048, Canadian Infantry. Samuel was born at West Bromwich on 24 May 1882, the son of Samuel and Sarah Green. By 1901 the family was residing at 11, Northgate Street, Aberystwyth, where Samuel was an apprentice printer. Samuel migrated to Canada prior to the war with his brother Joseph, and the pair worked a farm at Saskatchewan. Samuel enlisted there on 31 March 1916 into the 232nd Battalion, Canadian Infantry, and was sent to England, before landing in France, joining the 28th Battalion, Canadian Infantry, which was attached to the 6th Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division. Samuel would have joined the battalion in France in time to fight on the Somme in the summer of 1916. In April 1917 the Canadian Corps famously captured Vimy Ridge, during the Battle of Arras, and later that year moved to Ypres, capturing Passchendaele village. By the spring of 1918 the Canadians were back in the Vimy sector, which was bypassed by the Germans during their Spring offensive of 21 March 1918. Samuel was killed during a relatively quiet period of the war, on 25 May 1918. He was 37 years old, and is buried at Bellacourt Military Cemetery, Riviere, France.

 

Eric Guy Harries, Captain, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Guy was born on 30 October 1892, the son of Dr. Thomas Davies and Annette Martha Harries, of Grosvenor House, Aberystwyth. He was an engineer at the Cambrian Railway Works at Oswestry prior to the war, and was commissioned into the 1/7th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 1 April 1913. At the outbreak of war the battalion became attached to 158 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. On 9 August 1915 the Division arrived at Suvla Bay on the Gallipoli Peninsula, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Guy was wounded on Chocolate Hill on 10 August 1915, and was evacuated aboard the SS Euripides on which he died on 17 August 1915, at the age of 22. Guy is buried at East Mudros Military Cemetery, Greece.

 

William Henry Harries, Private, 10789, South Wales Borderers. William, known locally as Willie, was born at Aberystwyth, and enlisted at Brecon into the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was stationed at Tientsin, China at the outbreak of war, and on 23 September 1914 landed at Lao Shan Bay for operations against the German territory of Tsingtao. On 4 December 1914 the battalion embarked at Hong Kong, landing at Plymouth 12 January 1915, and became attached to 87 Brigade, 29th Division. On 17 March 1915 the Division embarked at Avonmouth for operations at Gallipoli, landing at Cape Helles on 25 April 1915. The Brigade landed at “S” Beach, Morto Bay that day, and took their position with few casualties. William had been wounded at some time, and had returned to Britain, but upon recovering embarked at Avonmouth for Gallipoli aboard HMT Royal Edward. She was sailing for the island of Lemnos, a staging point for the Gallipoli peninsular with Willie aboard, but was spotted by the German submarine UB-14 in the Aegean Sea, and torpedoed, sinking within six minutes, with the loss of 935 lives. Willie was drowned on 13 August 1915 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

David Lewis Herbert, Engineer, Mercantile Marine. David was the son of Margaretta Herbert, of 27, Bridge Street, Aberystwyth. He was a long serving mariner, and by the outbreak of war was serving as Chief Engineer aboard the SS Reims, a transport steamer. David took ill whilst aboard Reims, whilst on voyage to Italy with a cargo of coal for the Italian Government. At the end of May 1917 his parents received a cable say he had been landed in Spain and taken to Aquilas Hospital where he later died on 17 May 1917. David is not commemorated on the Commonwealth War Graves Register.

 

Richard Boycott Hinckesman, Lance Corporal, 497, King Edward’s Horse. Richard was born at Bridgenorth, Shropshire on 11 November 1886, the son of Thomas Boycott and Georgina Matilda Hinkesman (nee Vaughan). The family later resided at Tan y Graig, Trinity Road, Aberystwyth. An all round sportsman excelling at cricket and football, Richard played for Aberystwyth Town Football Club, before migrating to Canada. He returned home from Canada on 2 July 1914 to enlist into the King Edward's Horse, a reserve Cavalry unit. It was mobilised on declaration of war and temporarily attached to 4th Cavalry Brigade. In April 1915, the regiment was split up, and the separate Squadrons attached to different Divisions. Richard died on 20 October 1915 while loading a wagon in a chalk pit, when a large pile of earth fell onto him. He had only recently been recommended for a commission. He was 28 years old, and is buried in Louvencourt Military Cemetery, France.

 

James John Herbert Howard, Lance Corporal, 19963, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. James was born in 1892, the son of Margaret Howard, of Mill Street, Aberystwyth. He was a faithful member of Tabernacle Chapel Sunday School and played football for Aberystwyth Town FC prior to the war. James originally enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 9th Welsh, but transferred to the 16th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began on 7 July, but met with fierce resistance, and it took until 14 July to totally clear the wood. James suffered serious injuries to his leg and arm when a shell exploded near to him during the assault on Mametz Wood. Capt G D Ellis, his senior officer in the 16th RWF informed his parents that “there was little room to hope that he would recover”. James died on 12 July 1916, aged 23, and was buried in Carnoy Military Cemetery, France.

 

Alfred Ernest Howell, Sergeant, 237386, Canadian Infantry. Alfred was born on 18 January 1880, the son of Alfred and Sarah Howell, of Glynbwch, Crosswood near Aberystwyth. Formerly a butler and valet in Staffordshire he emigrated to Canada with his wife Harriet in 1910 and was employed in a foundry in Toronto. On 3 April 1916 he enlisted into the Canadian forces having served in the military before the outbreak of war. Before going to France, he served as an instructor to the Canadian troops in England. In 1918 Alfred was in France with the 54th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. The battalion was attached to the 11th Brigade, 4th Canadian Division. Alfred joined the battalion in time to take part in the Battle of Amiens on 8 August 1918, the turning point of the war. A fantastic victory was achieved at Villers-Brettoneux that day, which began the great offensive towards the Hindenburg Line. After just five weeks active service, Alfred was killed in action on 2 September 1918, aged 38. He is buried in Dury Mill Military Cemetery, France.

 

Evan Thomas Hughes, Driver, 452275, Royal Engineers. Evan was born in 1896, the son of Elizabeth Kate Hughes, of Little Dark Gate Street, Aberystwyth. He worked for the Cambrian News prior to enlisting into the Royal Engineers Territorials, and served in Palestine as a driver with U Corps Signal Company, Royal Engineers. Evan survived the war, but had taken ill with pneumonia, and was hospitalised at Alexandria. He died of pneumonia in Palestine on 12 November 1918, aged 22, and is buried in Alexandria War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Llewellyn Hughes, Wireless Operator, Mercantile Marine. Llew was born in 1890, the son of Mrs Mary Hughes of Moel-y-Don, Prospect Street, Aberystwyth. He served in the Mercantile Marine. Llewellyn had a busy war. On 4 November 1915 he was hospitalised when his ship, the troopship Mercian, suffered damage when intercepted and shelled by the German submarine U-38. Upon recovering, Llewellyn became a Wireless Operator aboard the SS Eloby, a Liverpool registered steamer. On 19 July 1917, Eloby was on route to Alexandria, with a cargo of explosives, when she was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean by the German submarine U-38, with the loss of 156 lives. Llewellyn was 27 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Lewis Reginald Hughes, Second Lieutenant, North Staffordshire Regiment. Lewis was born in 1882, the son of Arthur Johnson Hughes, who was Town Clerk of Aberystwyth, and Mary Elizabeth Hughes, of Aberystwyth. He was a solicitor prior to the war, and commissioned into the 4th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment on 15 August 1914. On 17 March 1915 Lewis arrived in France, and was attached to the 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers. The battalion was attached to 21 Brigade, 7th Division, and was in action at Neuve Chappelle. During May 1915 they fought at the Battle of Aubers Ridge, and the ensuing Battle of Festubert. Lewis was badly wounded at Festubert, and was evacuated to the nearby hospital at Bethune, where he died on 19 May 1915. Lewis was 32 years old, and is buried at Bethune Town Cemetery, France.

 

Mesach Price Hughes, Private, 25078, Welsh Regiment. Mesach was born in 1882, the son of John Lewis Hughes and Mary E Hughes, of Baker Street, Aberystwyth. Prior to the war he resided at Caerau with his wife, Martha Mary Hughes, and their two young children, Dorothy and Griffith. Mesach enlisted at Wrexham on 1 September 1914 into the 8th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, but was discharged as medically unfit on 6 November 1914. Un-deterred, he re-enlisted at Maesteg into the 17th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France during the first week of  June 1916, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. Mesach was reported missing when the remnants of the 17th Welsh were withdrawn from the wood, but it soon became apparent that he had been killed in action on 25 November 1917. Mesach was 35 years old, and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

 

Thomas Hugh Hughes, Lance Corporal, 14851, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was born in 1898, the son of Thomas and Laura Hughes, of 12, Portland Road, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the South Wales Borderers. He enlisted at Brecon on 8 November 1913, falsely declaring his age to be 18 years and 268 days, and joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was discharged on 30 January 1914 after his true age had been discovered, but Thomas was un-deterred, and at the outbreak of war re-enlisted, and was posted to France, joining the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. Thomas joined the battalion at Ypres on 13 November 1914. He fought at the First Battle of Ypres that year, and remained with the battalion in Flanders over the winter. Thomas became an officers servant, probably after his age had been realised, and took part in the Battle of Neuve Chapelle the following year. He was killed in action at Cuinchy on 7 June 1917, just a month after his seventeenth birthday. Thomas was buried at Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, France. His mother had only just received a letter from him stating that he hoped to be home in time for his birthday, on 1 May.

 

Thomas William James, First Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Thomas was the son of David and Mary Jane James (nee Rees), of 11, Sea View Place, Aberystwyth. He served with the Mercantile Marine as First Engineer on the SS Kildonan, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 26 October 1917, Kildonan was carrying a cargo of ore when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-35. Thomas was 26 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

John Hugh Joel, Private, 37458, Machine Gun Company. John was born in 1883, the son of Abraham and Elizabeth Joel, of Green Gardens, Aberystwyth. He resided at Llanwonno prior to the war, and in March 1916 enlisted at Tredegar into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. John was later transferred into the 4th Company, Machine Gun Corps, which was attached to the 16th (Irish) Division. John’s machine gun team was in action at Ypres when he was struck by a shell splinter and killed on 16 August 1917, aged 34. He was buried in a small cemetery near Ypres, but his grave was subsequently lost during further fighting in the area, and he is now commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

 

David Jones, First Engineer, Mercantile Marine. David, known locally as Dei, was the son of Captain Richard David Jones and Mary Jones, of Ael-y-Bryn, Talybont. He served with the Mercantile Marine as First Engineer aboard the SS Argyle, a Newport registered steamer. On 13 April 1917, Argyle was on route from Port Kelah for Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-84, off Harwich, with the loss of 22 lives. David was 28 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

David Hughes Jones, Master, Mercantile Marine. David was born in Aberystwyth and had served for 47 years at sea. He resided at Bodawen, Llangrannog prior to the war. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Greldon. On 8 October 1917, Greldon was torpedoed off Ireland by the German submarine U-96, and sank with the loss of 28 lives, including David, who is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

David John Jones, Able Seaman, J/21319, Royal Navy. David was born on 7 November 1896, the son of David Jones, of Holmhurst 5, Rheidol Terrace, Penparcau, Aberystwyth. David enlisted on 31 October 1912 aboard HMS Impregnable, and served in the Atlantic in the following years prior to the war. On 9 February 1917 he was posted to HMS Warner, which was based at Queenstown, operating as HMS Q7. She was an armed merchant ship, with concealed weaponry, designed to counter the U boat threat. On 13 March 1917, Q7 was operating off Shannon, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-61. Six men were picked up by the submarine and taken as prisoners, but David and another ten men were killed. David was 20 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Edwin Griffiths Jones, Private, 22360, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Edwin was born in 1884, the son of John and Susannah Jones, of Aberystwyth, and after graduating from the university in 1911 taught Geography at the County School. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Lily Jones, at 2, Llican Terrace, Great Orme, Llandudno. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division, and landed in France on 2 December 1915, moving to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. On 7 May 1916, a party of the 15th RWF was detailed to raid the German trenches at Fauqissart, and that night the men, armed with clubs, knives and rifles, crossed No Man's Land into the German lines, killing around 50 Germans, and capturing several prisoners. Edwin was wounded during the raid, and was helped back to the Welshmen's lines. He was evacuated to Hospital at Merville where he died on 8 May 1916. Edwin is buried at Merville Communal Cemetery, France.

 

Frank Hinton Jones, Private, 28325, King’s Own (Royal Lancashire Regiment). Frank was born in 1897, the son of John Jones, of 61, North Parade, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth on 25 October 1915 into the Army Service Corps, and was posted to France on 25 November 1915. Frank was wounded on 23 January 1916, and sent to the 4th Field Ambulance, before being invalided to Britain. Upon his recovery, on 24 September 1917 he was transferred to the 8th Battalion, King’s Own Royal Lancashire Regiment. The battalion was attached to 76 Brigade, 3rd Division, and Frank joined them at Ypres, where they fought in the Third Battle of Ypres, at the Battle of the Menin Road and the Battle of Polygon Wood. In November the Division moved south again, where they fought at the Battle of Cambrai, and they were in the area during March 1918 when the German Spring Offensive swept through the British lines, at the Battle of St Quentin and the First Battle of Bapaume. They then fought at the First Battle of Arras 1918 before being moved to Flanders to rebuild. However the Germans switched the focus of their offensive to Flanders, and the Division were caught up in the worst of the fighting there, at the Battle of Estaires. Frank was killed in action here on 13 April 1917, aged 19, and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.

 

John Arthur Jones, Private, 22445, Somerset Light Infantry. John was the son of John and Margaret Jones of 2, Powell Street, Aberystwyth. He was a journalist prior to the war, and resided at Bow Street, Longport, Somerset. John enlisted at Taunton into the 8th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry. On 10 September 1915 the battalion landed at Le Havre, attached to 63 Brigade, 21st Division, and in July 1916 fought at the Battle of Albert. On 8 July 1916, 63 Brigade, transferred to the 37th Division on the Somme. The Division then moved to Arras, and took part in the First Battle of the Scarpe, where they captured Monchy le Preux. They then took part in the Second Battle of the Scarpe, and the Battle of Arleux before moving north to Ypres. Here, they fought throughout Third Ypres. John was killed at Ypres on 31 July 1917. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

 

John Carrane Jones, Private, 2791, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. John was the son of Richard Jones, of Radford House, Aberystwyth. He enlisted on 11 February 1915 into the 2/5th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, but was discharged two days later as being medically unfit. John appears to have died in Aberystwyth in 1916. Nothing further is known of him, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

John Evan Jones, Private, 38504, Gloucester Regiment. John was born in 1899, the son of Joseph and Jane Jones. Joseph was from Llanbadarn, and worked as a labourer, moving the family from Aberystwyth, Towyn, Henllys and Llandyssilio prior to the war. John enlisted at Wrexham into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to France at sometime after 1917, joining the 8th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, which was attached to 57 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. John probably joined the battalion after its exertions at Messines in 1917. The Division then fought on the Menin Road and at Polygon Wood, before moving up to Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. In 1918 the Division was caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where they suffered terrible casualties, taking part in a gallant rearguard action around Bapaume, before moving to Ypres to rebuild. Unfortunately the next phase of the German plan was a strike at Messines, to force a passage to the channel ports. John was killed during the German attack at Messines on 9 April 1918. He was 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

 

John James Jones, Driver, 243868, Royal Field Artillery. John was born in 1894, the son of Jane Jones, of Brynteg, Custom House Street, Aberystwyth. He served on the Western Front as a Driver with the Royal Field Artillery. John died at home on 18 November 1918, aged 24, and was buried in Blaenplwyf Calvinistic Methodist Chapelyard, Blaenplwyf, Aberystwyth.

 

Richard Jones, Private, 35310, Welsh Regiment. Richard was born at Aberystwyth in 1882, the son of Margaret Jones, of Gogerddan Place. He enlisted in November 1915 at Aberystwyth into the army, and was posted to France, joining the 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 2 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. Richard was killed during the battalion’s attack on Mametz Wood on 10 July 1916, aged 33. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. Richard left a widow and six children.

 

Robert Jones, Guardsman, 1237, Welsh Guards. Robert was born in Aberystwyth in 1880, the son of John and Eleanor Jones. He enlisted at Aberdare into the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards. The Regiment was raised by Royal Warrant of 26 February 1915, at White City, before landing at Le Havre on 18 August 1915, becoming attached to 3rd Guards Brigade, Guards Division. The Division saw its first major action during the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915, remaining in the area during the coming months, where they also fought in the subsequent Action of Hohenzollern Redoubt. In July 1916 the Division moved to the Somme, where they fought at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, and then at the Battle of Morval, capturing Lesboeufs Village. They remained here for the winter, and it was during this dismal period of the war that Robert was wounded. He died of wounds on 1 January 1917, aged 37and is buried in Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte, France.

 

Robert Brythom Jones, Royal Army Medical Corps. Robert was born in 1893, the son of William Jones, of 14, Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. He served during the war with the Royal Army Medical Corps. Robert died at Aberystwyth late in 1918, probably as a result of his military service. He is not commemorated by the CWGC, so no further information is currently available.

 

Thomas Owen Jones, Seaman, 4056A, Royal Naval Reserve. Tommy was a member of the Royal Naval Reserve in Aberystwyth and on 4 August 1914 he and his fellow reservists entrained for Devonport. Tommy was one of fifteen men from the town who served on HMS Jupiter which saw service in the White Sea during February and March of 1915. Her task was to ensure the passage to Archangel, Russia was kept clear of ice so that supplies for the Russian Army could continue to flow. In recognition of their service the Emperor of Russia, Tzar Nicholas II, conferred on the officers and men the Russian Medal for Zeal. On his return to Aberystwyth Tommy was transferred to the mine sweeper HMPMS Nepaulin. She was the Clyde paddle steamer Neptune converted for mine sweeping duties with the Dover Patrol because of her shallow draft. On 20 April 1917 she struck a mine off the Dutch coast and sank taking eighteen crew to the bottom. Tommy was at the wheel at the time of his death and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. He left a wife and young child.

 

William Jones, Engineer, Mercantile Marine. William was the son of John Jenkin Jones and Martha Jones, of Aberystwyth, and husband of Jane of 15, North Parade, Aberystwyth. William served with the Mercantile Marine as Second Engineer on the SS Lena, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 13 July 1917, Lena was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-61, off the Scilly Isles, with the loss of all hands. William was 54 years old when he drowned that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill memorial, London.

 

William Jones, Rifleman, 653423, London Regiment. William was the husband of Catherine Jones of 58 Terrace Road, Aberystwyth and was a faithful member of Tabernacle Chapel. He enlisted at Camberwell into the 21st Battalion, London Regiment (1st Surrey Rifles), which was attached to 142 Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. The Division fought at the Battle of Aubers, and the Battle of Festubert during May 1915 and in September fought at the Battle of Loos, and subsequent Action of Hohenzollern Redoubt. They were north of Arras when the Germans attacked Vimy Ridge, and then moved south to the Somme, where they fought at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, and then at the Battle of Le Transloy, where the Division captured Eaucourt l'Abbe, and took part in Attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. Early in 1917 the Division moved north to Belgium, and took part in the Battle of Messines. William was wounded soon after the move to Belgium, and died of his wounds on 18 May 1917, aged 40. William is buried in Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium.

 

William Hazzelby Jones, Private, 42019, Welsh Regiment. William was the husband of Elizabeth Jones, of 8, Princess Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the Welsh Regiment, and was posted to the 23rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion was known as the Welsh Pioneers, and formed at Porthcawl in September 1915. In March 1916 it moved to Aldershot, becoming attached to the 69th Division, and on 13 July 1916 embarked at Devonport for Salonika, arriving on 24 August 1916, joining the 28th Division as its Pioneer Battalion. William wasn't at the front long, as he became ill, and died of malaria on 1 December 1916, aged 39. William is buried in Lahana Military Cemetery, Salonika.

 

Arthur Leech, Corporal, 53826, King's Liverpool Regiment. Arthur was the son of John and Jane Leech, of Manchester. He resided at Aberystwyth for several years prior to the war with his grandparents, and had married Gertrude Annie Powell, of Sunny Deane, Powell Street, Aberystwyth, in 1914. Arthur enlisted into the Royal Field Artillery in 1916, and was posted to France in May 1917, where he was transferred to the 4th Battalion, King's Liverpool Regiment. The battalion was attached to 98 Brigade, 33rd Division, at Arras. The Division had fought at the Battle of the Scarpe and at Bullecourt, before heading to Ypres, and fighting at the Menin Road and at Polygon Wood later that year. They were still in Flanders when Arthur was killed in action on 17 March 1918, aged 26. Arthur is buried in Dochy Farm New British Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Ernest Lewis, Lance Corporal, 18745, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Ernest was born in Devon, and enlisted in Aberystwyth into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Ernest was attached to one of the battalions which was attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division, and landed in France on 2 December 1915. At some time after he was transferred to the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to the Somme in 1916, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Poziéres and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved north to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, and fought on the Menin Road and at Polygon Wood, before moving up to Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. In 1918 they were caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where they suffered terrible casualties, and fought at the Battle of Bapaume. They moved to Ypres, but were caught up in the German attack at Messines. Ernest must have been taken prisoner by the Germans during this time, and died in captivity on 29 July 1918. Ernest is buried in Mons Communal Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Nevill Graham Newcombe Hart Lewis, Captain, Monmouth Regiment. Nevill was the son of Dr. David Thomas and Lucy Mildred Lewis. He resided at Aberystwyth prior to the war, with his sister Vera at 48, Marine Terrace. Nevill joined the Monmouthshire Regiment as a Private, and was commissioned into the 1/3rd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment. The Battalion landed in France on 14 February 1915, joining 83 Brigade, 28th Division. After receiving heavy casualties at Second Ypres, on 27 May 1915 it amalgamated with the 1/1st and 1/2nd Battalions at Vlamertinghe before resuming its identity on 11 August 1915 and rejoining 83 Brigade. On 2 September 1915 the battalion joined the 49th Division, and became the Pioneer Battalion. It was broken up on 31 August 1916, and its men were posted to the 1/1st and 1/2nd Battalions. Nevill was transferred as a Lieutenant to the 8th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment, which was the Pioneer Battalion to the 18th (Eastern) Division. In March 1917 they followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and in May took part in the Third Battle of the Scarpe, which was part of the Arras Offensive. July, 1917 saw the Division at Ypres, where they took part in the Battle of Pilckem, where they helped capture Westhoek, and then they fought at the Battle of Langemarck, and at the First Battle of Passchendaele. Nevill was engaged in preparatory work, prior to the assault on Passchendaele Ridge when he killed by a shell on 17 September 1917. He was 24 years old, and is buried in Duhallow ADS Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Trefor Lewis, Private, 77027, Royal Army Medical Corps. Trefor was the son of James and Elizabeth Lewis of Willows, 27, Portland Street, Aberystwyth. He was employed on the clerical staff of the National Library of Wales and a member of St Paul’s Chapel, prior to enlisting into the Royal Army Medical Corps. Trefor was posted to the 5th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, which was attached to the 2nd Division. The Division had been in France since the outbreak of war, and had fought in the retreat from Mons to the Marne. The 2nd Division was then moved to Flanders, and fought at the First Battle of Ypres, when the German sweep through Flanders was stopped, remaining there throughout the first winter of the war. In 1915 they took part in the Battle of Festubert, and in September fought at the Battle of Loos, and subsequent Action of Hohenzollern Redoubt. In the summer of 1916 the Division was on the Somme, and took part in the Battle of Delville Wood. Trefor was wounded here on the 8 August 1916. He was repatriated back to the UK and admitted into Hampstead Hospital where he died on 20 August 1916, aged 20. Trefor was buried with full military honours in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

David Albert Lloyd, Third Engineer, Mercantile Marine. David, known as Albert, was born in Aberaeron and was the son of David and Mary Lloyd. The family later resided at 36, Queen Street, Aberystwyth. David was a long serving seaman. On 1 May 1915 he survived when his ship, the SS Edale, was torpedoed by the German submarine U-30, whilst on voyage from Argentina to Liverpool. Upon returning to Britain, he was posted aboard the SS Blake, a London registered steamer. On 24 July 1917, Blake was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UC-49, whilst on route from Penarth to Archangel, with the loss of five lives. David was 29 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. John Richards of 30, South Road was Second Engineer on the same ship and survived. He said she sank inside two minutes and of the 56 on board, 51 were saved but Albert was missing.

 

Hugh Lloyd, Lieutenant, King's African Rifles. Hugh was born in 1890, the son of Edward and Sarah Lloyd, of Parcyllyn, Llanbadarn. He worked in London as a Bank Clerk prior to the war, before enlisting into the Motor Machine Gun Corps. Hugh landed in East Africa on 16 March 1916, probably serving in an armoured car unit, operating against the German forces in East Africa. He was commissioned into the 1st/3rd Battalion, King's African Rifles on 27 April 1917. Sadly Hugh took ill, and died in Africa on 19 July 1917. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Dar Es Salaam War Cemetery, Tanzania.

 

William John Lloyd, Private, 13849, South Wales Borderers. William was born in Aberdare and was the husband of Elizabeth Lloyd, 15, Gray’s Inn Road, Aberystwyth. He was a time expired soldier who had served throughout the Boer War, and was recalled from the reserve at the outbreak of war, joining the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division had been one of the first to arrive in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and taking part in the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, and at Chivy, before being moved north to Ypres. Here they fought at the First Battle of Ypres, where they again stopped the German Offensive, before wintering in Flanders. The following year saw them in action again at the Battle of Aubers. William was wounded here, and died in hospital on 10 May 1915, aged 36. He is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery, France.

 

William Robert Lloyd, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. William was born in 1894, the son of William and Elizabeth Jane Lloyd, of Bronglais, Aberystwyth. He was educated at Corris National School, Dolgellau County School and Grove Park School, Wrexham, prior to becoming the assistant master at Bedwellty Poor Law Institution prior to joining up. He originally enlisted into the Royal Army Medical Corps, but was commissioned into the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 26 June 1917, landing in France on 12 August 1917 to join up with the battalion, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had just had its epic fight at Pilckem Ridge. After being relieved from the Ypres sector, the 38th Division moved back to Armentieres, to rest and rebuild, but in March 1918 moved south to take over the Aveluy Wood sector, north of Albert, on the Somme. Here, William was attached to the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which had recently joined the Division. On 12 July 1918, the 2nd RWF were tasked with a raid on the German positions at Hamel. After a short barrage, the men went forward into the German lines, and a tremendous fight ensued, but the raid was successful, with 19 prisoners and a machine-gun captured, and over 50 Germans killed. Casualties amongst the 2nd RWF were relatively light, but William had been killed that day, and was left in No Man's Land. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France. In a letter home to William's parents, Lieutenant E. E. Lloyd, 2nd RWF, said that William was leading a raid on a village one night and had reached the other side when they came under heavy trench mortar fire, and though wounded he continued to lead until he fell mortally wounded.

 

Lewis William Marles-Thomas, Second Mate, Mercantile Marine. Lewis was the son of Reverend William Marles-Thomas and Mary Marles-Thomas of Llandyssul, Cardiganshire. He served with the Mercantile Marine as Second Mate on the SS Daleby, a West Hartlepool registered steamer. On 29 April 1917, Daleby was 180 miles off Fastnet Rock when she was struck by two torpedoes from the German submarine U-70, and sank with the loss of 28 lives. Lewis was 40 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Richard William Millman, Gunner, 168400, Royal Field Artillery. Richard was born on 1 September 1892, the son of Henry and Sarah J. Millman, of 3, Harbour Terrace, Trefechan, Aberystwyth. Richard worked for the Great Western Railway prior to the war, and was a pre-war territorial, reporting for duty with the Cardigan Battery, Royal Field Artillery on 5 August 1914. Richard was posted to the Guards Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the Guards Division. The Guards Division had had a hard war. It fought at Loos in September 1915, and in 1916 fought at the Somme. In 1917 the Guards fought at Third Ypres, and at the Battle of Cambrai. During 1918 the Division had fought against the German offensive on the Somme, and later that year took part in the great advance to victory, ending up at Maubeuge at the Armistice. Richard survived the war, but died of influenza on 6 December 1918 at the 4th Casualty Clearing Station. He was 26 years old, and is buried in Solesmes British Cemetery, France.

 

Hugh Philip Morgan MM, Lieutenant, Canadian Infantry. Hugh was born on 30 May 1892, the son of Benjamin Ellis and Mary Beatrice Morgan, of 2, Marine Terrace, Aberystwyth. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and had served with their OTC before migrating to Canada in June 1910, where he became an Accountant at the Canadian Bank of Commerce. He enlisted at Calgary on 24 November 1914 into the Canadian Infantry, and served on the Western Front from August 1915. He was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry after rescuing a wounded comrade under heavy fire at St. Eloi, and was commissioned into the 31st Battalion, Canadian Infantry in June 1916, serving with them on the Somme. In September 1916, shortly before the taking of Thiepval, he was wounded. After nearly a year in hospital he was employed for some months on light duties at home. Whilst on leave, on 31 May 1918 he married Enid Margaret Matthews, the daughter of the Rev W Matthews vicar of St Michael's, Aberystwyth. He returned to his battalion in France in August 1918, and took part in the famous advance to victory. Hugh was killed in action near Cambrai on 7 October 1918. He was 26 years old, and is buried in Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery, France.

 

John Morgan, Able Seaman, R/3446, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. John was born on 17 September 1880, and resided with his wife Elizabeth, at 28 Glenrafon Terrace, Trefechan, Aberystwyth. He enlisted into the Pembrokeshire Yeomanry on 9 December 1915 and was transferred into the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve on 11 July 1917. On 6 August 1917 John was sent to France amongst a number of reinforcements for Nelson Battalion, which was attached to the 63rd (Royal Naval) Division. The Royal Naval Division had moved from Arras to Ypres, where it took part in the assault on Passchendaele Ridge. John was shot in the arm during the assault on Passchendaele, and was evacuated to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station, where he died of his wounds on 13 October 1917, aged 37. John is buried there, at Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Owen Morgan, Corporal, 10823, South Wales Borderers. Owen was born at Aberystwyth. He joined the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers from the reserve at the outbreak of war. The battalion was in China at the outbreak of war, and fought at engagement against the German garrison at Tientsin before returning to England, joining 87 Brigade, 29th Division. The Division moved to Gallipoli via Egypt, landing on 25 April 1915. Owen joined the battalion at Gallipoli as part of a draft of reinforcements on 24 May 1915. The Division remained here until evacuation to Egypt on 11 January 1916 and then moved to the Western Front on 15 March 1916. The Division took part in its first major action in France during the 1916 Somme Offensive, and fought at the Battles of Albert and Le Transloy, suffering heavy casualties. At the beginning of February 1917 the Battalion took over from the Border Regiment and occupied the front line, German Trench for a three day tour. During 4 February 1917 the enemy shelled the 2nd Battalion’s position, and Owen was killed that day when a shell from a German trench mortar exploded, killing him and eight of his comrades. Owen is buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval, France.

 

Joel William Morris, Gunner, W/1386, Royal Field Artillery. Joel was born in 1890, the son of Rees and Sarah Morris, of Rose Cottage, Queens Street, Aberystwyth. He worked at Brynamman, and enlisted at nearby Ammanford into the Royal Field Artillery, serving in their 'B' Battery, 122nd Brigade, attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division. By 5 December 1915, the Division had disembarked at Boulogne, and during the winter and spring of 1916 held the line in French Flanders, before moving south to the Somme, where they fought at Mametz Wood. After a year in reserve, they fought at Pilckem Ridge and Langemarck, during the Third Battle of Third Ypres. Joel was killed in action during the Battle of Langemarck on 14 August 1917. He was 24 years old, and is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, Belgium.

 

William Henry Kenrick Owen, MID, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. William was born on 12 December 1893, the son of William Pierce Owen (Solicitor) and Ethel Owen, of Bodowen, Aberystwyth. He was educated at Aberystwyth Grammar School and Shrewsbury School before being admitted to Clare College Cambridge on 11 October 1913. On 15 August 1914 William applied for a commission into the army, and joined the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. William landed in France with the 9th Welsh on 18 July 1915, and moved to positions north of Loos. Here the Division was destined to stage a diversionary attack near Festubert, during the opening the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. William was in charge of the battalion scouts, and would have been one of the first out of the trenches when the whistles blew for the 9th Welsh to make their charge. Like many others that day, William was brought down, badly wounded, and was evacuated to the Military Hospital at Rouen. He died of his wounds there on 1 October 1915, aged 21. William is buried at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

 

John Frederick Parry, Lance Corporal, 32518, Welsh Regiment. John was born in Capel Bangor, the son of David Griffith Parry and Elizabeth Parry, of Neuadd Villa, Taliesin, Glandyfi, Cardiganshire. Prior to the war the family had moved to Brynawel Hotel, Aberystwyth. John enlisted there into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 2 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. After two days of heavy hand to hand fighting within the wood, the Germans withdrew, and the battered Welshmen moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal, where it remained until launching its attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. The 15th Welsh remained in the line, and also took part in the Battle of Langemarck, before the entire Division was moved to positions near Armentieres over the winter. After the Germans launched their offensive on the Somme on 21 March 1918, the Division was moved back to the Somme, and took up positions north of Albert, around Aveluy Wood. On 10 May 1918, the 15th Welsh attacked the German positions in Aveluy Wood, supported by an artillery barrage. The artillery officer had miscalculated the range, and their fire was brought down on the 15th Welsh, who suffered heavy casualties. John was badly wounded in Aveluy Wood, suffering a gunshot wound to his right leg and a fractured fibula, and died at Doullens that same day. He was 28 years old, and is buried in Doullens Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

 

Ivor Christmas Phillips, Private, 2633, (Kensington) Battalion London Regiment. Ivor was born at Aberystwyth on 25 December 1894, the son of David and Alice Phillips. By 1911 the family was residing at 5, Villiers Road, Southall, Middlesex, and Ivor enlisted at Southall into the 13th Battalion, London Regiment (Kensington). On 4 November 1914 the Battalion landed at Le Havre, joining 25 Brigade, 8th Division. Ivor joined the battalion at Ypres on 11 February 1915, and saw his first major action during the Battle of Aubers Ridge. Ivor was killed here on 9 May 1915. He was 20 years old and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.

 

Archie Potts, Corporal, 18734, Welsh Regiment. Archie was born in 1896, the son of John and Anne Jane Potts, of Isledon, Trinity Place, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 2 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. After two days of heavy hand to hand fighting within the wood, the Germans withdrew, and the battered Welshmen moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal, where it remained until launching its attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. Archie was killed in action at Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. He was 20 years old and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

 

James Pugh, Seaman, 3224/B, Royal Naval Reserve. James was born on 18 August 1884, the son of James and Elizabeth Pugh, of Portland Street, Aberystwyth. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Mary Pugh, at Chepstow House, Portland Road, Aberystwyth. He was a member of the Royal Naval Reserve in Aberystwyth and left for Devonport with his colleagues when mobilised on 4 August 1914. Like many of the Aberystwyth contingent he served on HMS Jupiter and was awarded the Russian Medal for Zeal for service in the White Sea in the winter of February and March 1915. In June 1918 he was mentioned in dispatches for good work in connection with minesweeping but in the last months of the war he died in hospital in Portsmouth of influenza 12 October 1918. He was 34 years of age and is buried in Haslar Royal Naval Cemetery, Portsmouth.

 

John Purnell, Stoker, 2867T, Royal Naval Reserve. John was born on 25 September 1878, the son of John and Bridget Purnell, of Swansea. He served in the Boer War with the South Wales Borderers, and up until the outbreak of The Great War, had also served for nine years in the Royal Naval Reserve. John had five children and was the husband of Margaret Purnell of 10, Thespian Street, Aberystwyth, and was a stoker on HMS Hussar. On 25 April 1915 he was in the Dardanelles about to play a part in one of the most heroic actions of the war. John, and other members of the Hussar, volunteered to man the troopship SS River Clyde and run her aground prior to the British assault on “V” Beach on the tip of the Helles Peninsula. He witnessed the winning of four VCs during the landing. Prior to his death on 20 December 1915, John was not in the best of health had suffered with chronic bronchitis for three months. He died 20 December 1915 at the age of 37 (his stated age was 33) and is buried in Nunhead (All Saints ) Cemetery, London.

 

David Lewis Richards, Private, 46064, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. David was born at Llangynfelyn in 1887, the son of Jane Richards. David later resided with his mother at Grove House, North Road, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the army on 10 December 1915, and was posted to France on 7 October 1916, joining the 14th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. David joined the battalion at Boesinghe, and was posted to D Company. He had only been in Belgium a matter of weeks, when he was shot in the head whilst in the front line. David died at Proven on 27 October 1916, aged 19, and is buried at Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Henry Morgan Richards, Private, 31742, Welsh Regiment. Henry was the son of Morgan and Mary Anne Richards, of 6, Little Dark Gate Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 2 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. After two days of heavy hand to hand fighting within the wood, the Germans withdrew, and the battered Welshmen moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal, where it remained until launching its attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. Henry was killed on 30 July 1917, on the eve of the attack on Pilckem Ridge. He was 39 years old, and is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Thomas Roberts, Private, 54967, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of William Roberts and Margaret Roberts, of Port Dinorwic. He had worked at Aberystwyth prior to enlisting there into the South Wales Borderers, but was later posted to the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. Thomas probably joined the battalion in Belgium, in time to take part in its attack during the Battle of Messines in July 1917. He took part in several major battles with the battalion over the coming months, before being captured by the Germans at sometime in 1918. Thomas died in captivity on 27 October 1918, aged 34, and is buried in Liege (Robermont) Cemetery, Belgium. Thomas is not commemorated on the Aberystwyth memorial, although the Library has his photograph in their collection.

 

Hugh Owen Rowe, Pioneer, 82545, Royal Engineers. Hugh, who was known locally as Hughie, was born at Aberystwyth in 1896, the son of John Hugh Rowe, musical director of the town band, and Elizabeth Rowe of Glencairn North Road, Aberystwyth. Hughie had played football for Aberystwyth Town FC prior to the war. He enlisted in 1915 into the Royal Engineers, and was posted to France early in 1916, joining the 8th Division Signal Company, Royal Engineers. The 8th Division was on to the Somme in 1916, where they fought at the Battle of Albert. In March 1917 they followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and later that year moved to Ypres, fighting at the Battle of Pilckem, and the Battle of Langemarck. In March 1918 the Division was on the southern end of the Somme, and here met the German Offensive head on, at the Battle of St Quentin, desperately fighting a rearguard action over the coming days, before being withdrawn from the line to rest. Hughie took ill with influenza during this period, and was evacuated to Etaples where he was hospitalised. Hughie was 22 years old when he died of influenza at the 51st General Hospital at Etaples on 5 May 1918. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, France.

 

Evan David Rowlands, Lance Corporal, 19964, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Evan was born in 1889, the son of Evan and Anne Rowlands, of 13, Bridge Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted in 1914 into the Welsh Regiment, but was transferred to the 16th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division, and landed in France on 2 December 1915, and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began on 7 July, but met with fierce resistance, and it took until 14 July to totally clear the wood. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Here they fought at the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, and the Battle of Langemarck. They then moved to Armentieres, where they remained from September 1917 until March 1918 when the German Spring Offensive was launched. The British had been over-run on the Somme, and in April the Division was moved South, taking up positions North of Albert, from where they weathered the storm of the coming months, until the war turned during the Battle of Amiens, on 8 August 1918. The Germans had now lost the upper hand, and the British regained the lost ground on the Somme after an attack which began on 21 August, with the 38th Welsh in the midst of the attack during the Battle of Albert, and then moving east, where they fought at the Battle of Bapaume. Then the move began towards the mighty Hindenburg Line, and the Division carried on with their march east, fighting at the Battle of Havrincourt, and the Battle of Épehy. A short rest period ensued, during which time the Canal du Nord was breached, so opening a passage through the Hindenburg Line. Evan was gassed during the fighting around the Canal du Nord, and was evacuated to Etaples for treatment. He then contracted influenza and pneumonia, and died at Etaples on 31 October 1918, aged 29. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, France.

 

James Rowlands, Private, 4660, Australian Infantry. James was born in 1885, the son of William and Margaret Rowlands, of 9, North Parade, Aberystwyth. He emigrated to Australia in 1912 and took up employment as a bank clerk in Melbourne. On 21 August 1915 James enlisted at Melbourne into the 7th Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, and embarked from Melbourne on 28 February 1916, aboard HMAT Themistocles. He disembarked at Suez on 28 February 1916, and joined up with his battalion in Egypt, where it was rebuilding after the Gallipoli campaign, and was attached to the 2nd Brigade, 1st Australian Division. In March 1916, the Division sailed for France, and entered the front line trenches in Flanders on 3 May 1916. The Divisions first major action in France was at Pozières, during the Somme offensive, where it fought between 23 to 27 July and at Mouquet Farm from 15 to 21 August. The battered Division was moved to Ypres, but returned to the Somme, spending the winter on 1916/1917 in trenches near Flers. In early 1917, the Germans withdrew to the Hindenburg Line and the 7th Battalion took part in the advance that followed, and stopped near Bullecourt. The battalion was withdrawn from the front line for training on 9 May 1917 and did not return to action until the Ypres offensive of September and October. It fought major battles at the Menin Road on 20 September and Broodseinde on 4 October 1917. James was killed by a shell at Broodseinde on 4 October 1917. He was 32 years old, and was buried on the battlefield. His grave was later relocated, and today, James is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery, Belgium. James had a colourful army career. He had been court martialled several times for being absent without leave, and had been reduced from Corporal to Private after suffering a spell in prison.

 

James Frederick Samuel, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. James was born in 1897, the son of Evan Isaac and Julia Alice Samuel, of Prospect House, 58, Cambrian Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted during Easter week 1916 into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and was quickly promoted to Lance Corporal, landing in France in January 1917. A former member of the College OTC, he received a commission on 26 June 1917 into the 13th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. James fought at the successful Battle of Pilckem Ridge, and the Battle of Langemarck. The Division then moved to Armentieres, where it remained from September 1917 until March 1918 when the German Spring Offensive was launched. The British had been over-run on the Somme, and so in April the Division was moved South, taking up positions North of Albert. On 22 April 1918, 113 Brigade was ordered to advance, and capture the heights of Bouzincourt Ridge, to secure observation over the Ancre Valley. In what was described as a minor affair, the brigade achieved its objective, but the 13th Royal Welsh Fusiliers lost six officers and sixty two other ranks dead. Among them was James who is buried in Bouzincourt Ridge Cemetery, France.

 

Thomas George Silcock, 103DA, Royal Naval Reserve. Thomas was born in 1897, the son of James and Elizabeth Silcock, of 12, Penmaesglas Street, Aberystwyth. He had served during the war with the Royal Naval Reserve, as a deck hand on minesweepers. He was 23 years old when he died on 9 November 1918, and was buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery with full military honours. Thomas is not commemorated by the CWGC as his sickness was not as a result of his military service.

 

Henry Smith, Second Lieutenant, Worcestershire Yeomanry. Henry was born at Aberystwyth in 1877, the son of George and Sophia Smith, of the Hotel, 24, Darkgate Street, Aberystwyth. He had played football for Aber in his youth, before marrying Mabel Esther, and the couple ran their own hotel at Ledbury, Herefordshire. Henry had volunteered to serve with the Worcestershire Yeomanry, becoming a sergeant before being commissioned on 28 July 1916. Henry had boarded the troopship S.S. Ivernia in December 1916, which was bound for the Mediterranean. On 1 January 1917 the ship was passing Cape Matapan, off Greece, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UB-47, with the loss of 120 lives. Henry was 38 years old when he drowned in an attempt to board a lifeboat that day. His body was washed ashore at Crete, and he is buried in Suda Bay War Cemetery, Crete. Henry is not commemorated on the Aberystwyth memorial, although the Library holds a photograph of him in its archives.

 

James Stephens, Private, 84505, Royal Army Medical Corps. James was the son of William and Mary Elizabeth Stephens, of 3, Spring Gardens, Trefechan, Aberystwyth.  Enlisted at Aberystwyth on 19 September 1916 into the Royal Army Medical Corps, and was posted to France on 4 April 1918, joining the 58th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, which was attached to the 19th (Western) Division. The Division had just moved to positions near Messines to rebuild after being decimated on the Somme the in March, following its desperate and gallant defensive action at Bapaume. James had only been at the front a few days, when he was killed in action on 18 April 1918 while doing good work as a stretcher-bearer. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium. His father William had died just after enlisting in 1915, and his brother William Thomas Stephens had been killed at Ypres in 1917.

 

William Owen Stephens, Driver, Royal Field Artillery. William was born at Aberystwyth in 1867, the son of Owen and Jane Stephens. He was the husband of Mary Elizabeth Stephens, and had several children, two of whom, James and William Thomas Stephens fell during the Great War. In March 1915 at the age of 46, William, a former territorial, had enlisted into the Cardigan Battery (Reserves) and had joined up with them in Cardiff. But he was soon taken ill and died of a fever three days later. He was buried with full military honours in Roath Churchyard. William was the father of James and William Stephens, who fell later in the war. He is not commemorated by the CWGC, so no further details are presently known.

 

William Thomas Stephens, Private, 27352, South Wales Borderers. William was the son of William Owen Stephens and Mary Elizabeth Stephens, of 3, Spring Gardens, Trefechan Aberystwyth. Formerly employed by the National Library, he enlisted at Aberystwyth into the South Wales Borderers. William was posted to France in 1916, joining the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 87 Brigade, 29th Division. The Division had fought at Gallipoli, before being evacuated to Egypt, moving to France in March 1916. The Division took part in its first major action in France during the 1916 Somme Offensive, and fought at the Battles of Albert and Le Transloy, suffering heavy casualties. In the Spring of 1917 they fought at the Battle of the Scarpe, which was part of the Arras Offensive, and then moved further north to Ypres. Here they fought at the Battle of Langemarck. William was killed in action here during the Battalions attack on Langemarck on 16 August 1917, aged 20. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. His father William Owen Stephens had died soon after enlisting, and his brother, James was killed in April 1918.

 

Thomas Stephenson, 25713, Battery Sergeant Major, Royal Field Artillery. Tom was born at Newark, Nottinghamshire in 1869. He married Bessie in 1901, and moved his family to Aberystwyth in 1912, where he became a postman, the couple residing at 13, Alexandra Road, Aberystwyth with their five children. Tom was an army pensioner who had served all over the empire during 18 years with the colours, and at the outbreak of war rejoined the Royal Field Artillery at Aberystwyth. He was posted to the 34th Division Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery on 4 May 1915. Tom didn't move to France with the Division in January 1916 as he was starting to suffer from illness. He was invalided out of the army on 6 December 1916, and died at Aberystwyth in the third quarter of 1917, aged 47. Tom is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Harold Sylvanus Thomas, Private, 9909, Honorable Artillery Company. Harold was born at Aberystwyth, the son of John and Margaret Thomas, of Granville, 1, North Parade. He resided in St. Clears at the outbreak of war, where he worked as a Bank Clerk, and enlisted at Carmarthen on 8 December 1915, and the following month was at Armoury House, London, after being posted to the 2nd Battalion, Honorable Artillery Company. The Battalion was attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division, and on 3 October 1916 landed at Havre, taking part in the advance to the Hindenburg Line in early 1917 after the German withdrawal. In Spring 1917 the Battle of Arras was launched, and Harold was killed in action on 15 May 1917, during the Battle of Bullecourt, after being shot in the head. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

 

Joseph Thomas, DCM, MM, Sergeant, 3238, Royal Scots. Joseph was born in 1888, the son of John and Elizabeth Thomas, of Llanbadarn. He married Christina Yeardly prior to the war, and lived with her at Cardigan. Joseph was an army reservist, and at the outbreak of war rejoined the 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots at Fife. He landed in France with the battalion on 23 October 1914, attached to 8 Brigade, 3rd Division. The Division moved to the Belgian frontier, and fought during the opening Battle of Mons, and in the retreat, to the Marne, where the German Offensive was stopped. They followed the German withdrawal to the Aisne, where they met them in battle, and stopped the advance on Paris. The Division then moved north to Flanders, and took part in the Battle of La Bassée, and at the Battle of Messines, which were a prelude to the First Battle of Ypres. They took part in the famous Christmas Truce on 25 December 1914 and remained at Ypres throughout the winter. In 1915 the Division saw action at Bellewaarde and Hooge, and took part in the Second attack on Bellewaarde, and in 1916 fought at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. Joseph was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry at Ypres. The citation in the London Gazette read; 'For conspicuous gallantry when leading his section in a bombing attack in face of heavy bomb and rifle fire. He set a splendid example by his own personal courage, and held on till the position was consolidated.' He took ill during this time, and returned to Llanbadarn to recuperate. He was back in France on 13 April 1916, whereupon he joined the 12th Battalion, Royal Scots, which was attached to 27 Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division. Joseph saw heavy fighting on the Somme that year. By April 1917 the Division had moved to Arras, and it was there, during the Battle of the Scarpe, that Joseph was killed, on 12 April 1917. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Brown's Copse Cemetery, Rouex, France. His widow Christina later remarried, and resided with her new husband at Grangehill Farm, Kinghorn, Fife.

 

J. Thomas. Mercantile Marine. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

George James Vearey, Private, 29610, South, Wales Borderers. George was born in 1884, the son of James and Mary Vearey, of 17, Northgate Street, Aberystwyth. He married Margaret Ann Rees, of Half-Way Inn, Trerddol, Glandyfi at Aberystwyth in the summer of 1917, just before embarking for France, joining the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was on the Flanders Coast attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division, and was preparing for an assault along the coast. After the Third Battle of Ypres had ground to a halt in the mud, the coastal operation was called off, and the 1st Division moved to Ypres. George was killed in action here during the Second Battle of Passchendaele, on 10 November 1917. He was 33 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

 

Thomas Rees Warrington, Private, 11413, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was born in 1896, the son of Edward Lloyd Warrington and Margaret Warrington (nee Jones), of 4, Fountain Road, Trefechan, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Brecon into the South Wales Borderers. Thomas landed in France on 4 January 1915, joining the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borders, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division was in Flanders, and was rebuilding after the First Battle of Ypres. During 1915 the Division saw heavy fighting at the Battle of Aubers, before moving South to Loos, where they fought during the Battle of Loos in September 1915, and the action at the Hohenzollern redoubt. The Division remained at Loos over the winter, and in February 1916 the 1st SWB were in trenches at Les Brebis. On 22 February 1916, snow fell on the lines, and under the cover of the snow, a party of men were sent out to recover the bodies of several of their comrades which had lain in No Man's Land for several weeks. Thomas was killed during the operation that day. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France. He was a faithful member of the Skinner Street Sunday School and had only recently been home on leave before returning to the trenches.

 

Stanley West, Private, 18358, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Stanley was born on 19 May 1880, the son of Arthur and Hannah West, of Aberystwyth. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Margaret Ellen West, at 1, Lledfam Place, Machynlleth. Stanley enlisted at Machynlleth into the 8th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 40 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division. Towards the end of February the entire Division concentrated at Blackdown in Hampshire, and on 13 June 1915 sailed for Alexandria, moving to Mudros before being landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli from 6 July 1915, relieving the 29th Division. The Division was evacuated from Suvla on 19 December 1915, and after a rest moved to the Helles bridgehead. On 8 January 1916, the Division was evacuated from Helles, and by 31 January was concentrated at Port Said, where they held forward posts in the Suez Canal defences. On 12 February 1916 the Division began to move to Mesopotamia, to strengthen the force being assembled for the relief of the besieged garrison at Kut al Amara. By 27 March, the Division had assembled near Sheikh Saad and came under orders of the Tigris Corps, and then took part in the attempts to relieve Kut. Stanley died of fever during the epic trek through the desert, on 1 July 1916. He was 36 years old, and is buried in Amara War Cemetery, Iraq.

 

Harry White, Sapper, 108108, Royal Engineers. Harry was born in 1895, the son of George and Sarah White, of 15, Thespian Street, Aberystwyth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth on 27 October 1914 into the 10th (Rhondda) Battalion, Welsh Regiment, giving his occupation as Blacksmith. Due to his trade, Harry was transferred to the 123rd Field Company, Royal Engineers on 24 November 1914, and became a Shoeing Smith. The company was attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division, and landed in France on 2 December 1915. Harry served with the Division throughout the war, seeing action at Mametz Wood in July 1916. The attack on the wood began on 7 July, but met with fierce resistance, and it took until 14 July to totally clear the wood. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Harry then transferred to the 151st Field Company, RE, still in the same Division. The Division fought at the Battle of Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917, and in the ensuing Battle of Langemarck. Harry was seriously wounded on 17 September 1917 after being struck in the leg by shrapnel, and was evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station where his leg was amputated. He was repatriated back to the UK, where his leg became septic, and had to be re-amputated, but sadly after suffering for several months, Harry died at the Barry Military Hospital at Northampton on 15 February 1918, aged 22. Harry’s funeral took place with full military honours in Llanbadarn Road Cemetery.

 

Thomas James White, Royal Field Artillery. Thomas was born in 1893, the son of James and Agnes White, of 13, Poplar Row, Aberystwyth. He served during the Great War with the Royal Field Artillery, and died at Aberystwyth in the summer on 1918, aged 23. No more is known of Thomas, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

David Williams, Captain Mercantile Marine. David cannot presently be identified.

 

Richard Emrys Williams, Air Mechanic, 82050, Royal Air Force. Richard was born in 1898, the son of Thomas Richard and Mary Ann Williams, of Argyle House, Chalybeate Street, Aberystwyth. He is the sole representative of the Royal Air Force commemorated on the Aberystwyth War Memorial and served in 99 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The Squadron was formed at Yatesbury, Wiltshire on 15 August 1917, equipped with de Havilland DH.9 bombers, and moved to France to form part of the Independent Air Force. The Squadron was withdrawn from the front line on 25 September 1918 to be re-equipped with de Havilland DH.9A bombers, and it was still being in the process of converting when the First World War ended. Richard survived the war, but died on 18 March 1919, aged 21. He was buried in Valenciennes Communal Cemetery, France. The cause of death is not known but it is highly likely that Richard succumbed to the Spanish Flu, as did others commemorated on the Aberystwyth Memorial. The pandemic was to last until 1920.

 

William Williams, Private, 4931, Australian Imperial Forces. William was the son of Daniel and Elizabeth Williams of 1, Williams Street, Aberystwyth. William was a sailor, and had emigrated to Australia at the age of fourteen, along with his brother, and prior to the war had married, residing with his wife, Sarah Ann Williams, at Freemantle, Western Australia. William enlisted at Blackboy Hill on 28 February 1916 into the 11th Battalion, Australian Infantry, and on 1 April 1916 left Fremantle aboard HMAT Ulysses, bound for Egypt. At Tel-El-Kabir William's group of reinforcements joined with veterans from Gallipoli to form the 51st Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, which became attached to the 13th Brigade, 4th Australian Division. Arriving in France on 12 June 1916, the 51st Battalion moved into the front line, and fought in its first major battle at Mouquet Farm in August and September 1916, suffering almost 30 percent casualties. The battalion saw out the rest of the year, alternating between front-line duty, and training and labouring behind the line near Flers during the bleak winter of 1916-17. Early in 1917, the battalion followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and on 2 April 1917 it attacked at Noreuil. Later in the year, the AIF moved to Ypres, and the 4th Division fought in the battle of Messines between 7 and 12 June, and the battle of Polygon Wood between 26 and 27 September. William was killed in action at Polygon Wood on 29 September 1917. His grave was never located, so William is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

 

Ernest Worthington, Private, 22723, Welsh Regiment. Ernest was born on 11 December 1897, the son of Reginald and Annie Worthington, of More Lane, Aberystwyth. On his 17th birthday, on 11 December 1914, Ernest enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozières and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved north to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines. Ernest had by now been wounded in action three, but was unlucky at Messines, being killed in action on 7 August 1917, aged 19. He was buried in Oosttaverne Wood Cemetery, Belgium.

 

Aberystwyth (St. Michael's Church) War Memorial, World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Alexander John Aitken, Private, 6447508, Army Catering Corps. Alexander was the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Aitken, and the husband of Ellen Dorothy Aitken, of Hounslow, Middlesex. Alexander was attached to the 9th King's Liverpool Regiment when he died on active service at Blackpool on 5 February 1945, aged 55. He was buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. Alexander is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

David Campbell Anderson, Flying Officer, 400453, Royal Australian Air Force. David was born on 5 February 1914, the son of David and Florence Campbell Anderson, of Horsham, Victoria, Australia. He enlisted into the Royal Australian Air Force, and embarked from Australia for England, joining 1 Operational Squadron, Royal Air Force. David was killed in an accident while piloting a Lockheed Hudson III, Serial V9127, on 10 February 1942, aged 28. His three fellow crewmen were also killed; Sgt G.R. Duncan, Sgt J.H. Harker, and Sgt R. Hodgson. David was buried with full military honours at Aberystwyth Cemetery. David is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Derek Jones Bates, Flight Sergeant, 1684954, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Derek was the son of Henry Walter and Lilian Scandrett Bates, of Hale Cheshire. He served with 114 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, which was based in the Mediterranean area from 1942 through to 1945, equipped with the Douglas Boston. The squadron took part in the invasion of North Africa and had moved to mainland Italy at the time Derek went missing in action on 21 February 1945. He was 23 years of age and is commemorated on the Malta Memorial, Malta.

 

John Lloyd Bebb, Captain, Air Transport Auxiliary. John was born on 4 July 1901, the son of William Bruce Bebb and Elizabeth Bebb of Capel Bangor, and the husband of Laura Jane Bebb, of Aberystwyth. He obtained his pilot's license in 1932, and went on to serve with the Air Transport Auxiliary, a civilian organisation that ferried new, repaired and damaged military aircraft between factories, assembly plants, and transatlantic delivery points. John died at Throckmorton, Worcestershire on 30 January 1942, aged 40, and is buried at Capel Madog Methodist Chapelyard.

 

Ronald John Beck, Fusilier, 834197, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Ronald was the son of William and Louisa Beck, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion was on the Belgian frontier at the outbreak of war, and took part in the retreat to Dunkirk. Ronald was probably involved in this epic evacuation, and died as a result on 31 May 1940. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Shorncliffe Military Cemetery, England.

 

Herman Benson, Leading Writer, D/MX 67836, Royal Navy. Herman was the son of Russell Heber Benson and Elizabeth Benson, of Aberystwyth. He served on the Cruiser HMS Charybdis, which had been commissioned in December 1941. In 1942 she did valuable service in the Mediterranean, as an escort ship during the important Malta Convoys. In October 1943 she was part of a force sent to intercept the German blockade runner Munsterlund off the Britanny coast, but during the night a flotilla of German torpedo boats attacked the Charybdis and the other vessels and made off into the night. The Charybdis was sunk with the loss of 30 officers and 432 ratings. Herman was 23 years of age when he lost his life on 23 October 1943 and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

John Bolden, Captain, 168432, Royal Artillery. John was the son of Fred and Clara Annie Bolden, and the husband of Elsie May Bolden, of Church End, Finchley Middlesex. John had served with 13 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery during the war, and died at Aberystwyth on 1 May 1946, aged 52. He is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. John is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

William George Boyce, Steward, P/LX 573258, Royal Navy. William was born at Aberystwyth in 1909, the son of Edward and Mary Ann Boyce. He married Clarice Taylor at Atcham, Shrewsbury in 1935. William served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Pylades, a Catherine Class Minesweeper. On 8 July 1944, Pylades was operating off Juno Beach when two explosions rocked her, causing her to sink. William was killed during the sinking that day. He was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire. The cause of the explosions was at the time thought to have been caused by mines, but recent research carried out during a dive carried out by Channel 4's programme Shipwreck Detectives, indicates that she had been torpedoed.

 

Thomas John Brodigan, Fusilier, 859495, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of Richard and E. A. Brodigan, of Penparke. He served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion had taken part in the retreat to Dunkirk during the beginning of war, and after being rebuilt had been sent to the Far East, taking part in the Burmese Campaign. Thomas was killed in Burma on 18 March 1943. He was 24 years old and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

 

David Bryson, Corporal, Royal Air Force. David was the son of Andrew and Christina Bryson, Scottish emigrants who had moved to Vancouver. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force and was killed in a flying accident near Aberystwyth on 8 August 1943, aged 22. David is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. David is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Edward Bertie Bull, Lieutenant, Royal Navy. Edward was the son of Edward George and Alice Henrietta Bull, and the husband of Gertrude Mary Vaughan Bull, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Navy aboard HM Submarine Grampus, a mine-laying submarine. She served off China before moving to the Mediterranean in 1940. On 24 June 1940, Grampus was laying mines in the Syracuse and Augusta, Sicily area when she was spotted by the Italian torpedo boat Circe, which was on anti-submarine patrol with three other vessels. After a short fight, Grampus was destroyed, and sank with the loss of all hands. Edward was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Kenneth Rees Burbeck, Flying Officer (Pilot), Royal Air Force. Kenneth was born at Aberystwyth in 1920, the son of John Edward Burbeck, DCM, and Frances Emily Burbeck, of Shirley, Birmingham. Kenneth trained as a Pilot at the start of the war, and was commissioned from Flight Sergeant on 11 February 1943, joining 100 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The squadron was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. On the night of 22 September 1943, Kenneth took off in his Lancaster as part of a group of 711 aircraft that had been despatched to bomb Hanover. He was killed when his Lancaster was shot down over Germany the following morning of 23 September 1943. Kenneth was 23 years old, and is buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Frank Cooley, Gunner, 847924, Royal Artillery. Frank was the son of Richard and Ada Cooley, of Wallsall, Staffordshire, and the husband of Gwladys Cooley, of Aberystwyth. He served with 15 Battery, 6 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was based at Singapore and Java. Frank was taken prisoner when Singapore was surrendered to the Japanese in December 1941, and went into captivity. He was one of 1,100 men who boarded the Japanese 'Hellship' Singapore Maru at Singapore on 30 October 1942, which was bound for Japan, where the men would be used as forced labour. Frank died of exhaustion aboard her on 23 November 1942, aged 25, and was buried at sea. He is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore. Frank is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Morgan Hugh Garland Coombe, Guardsman, 2738330, Welsh Guards. Morgan was the son of Edward G. and Gwladys Coombe, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Guards. The battalion was formed at Beavers Camp, Hounslow on 24 October 1941, and sailed for North Africa on 5 February 1943, landing in Algiers on 16 February. They joined the 1st Guards Brigade near Medjez El Bab on 1 March 1943. The battalion then took part in the Tunisian Campaign. Morgan was killed during the capture of the town of Hammam Lif on 23 June 1943. He was 22 years old, and is buried in Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

James Edward Curtis, Leading Aircraftman, R/131242, Royal Canadian Air Force. James was the son of James Leonard and Florence Margaret Curtis, and the husband of Elizabeth Curtis, of Burlington, Ontario Canada. He served with the Royal Canadian Air Force, and was killed in a flying accident near Aberystwyth on 26 February 1943. James was buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

William James Daniel, Fusilier, 14320767, Royal Welch Fusiliers. William was the son of David James Daniel and Mary Alice Daniel, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion took part in the Burmese campaign, and it was there that William was killed on 3 February 1945. He was 20 years old, and is buried in Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar.

 

Alun Meilir Davies, Private, 14635646, Parachute Regiment. Alun was the son of William and Martha Davies, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 9th Battalion, Parachute Regiment, Army Air Corps. The battalion was tasked with the capture of the famous Merville Gun Battery in Normandy, and landed around the area in gliders during the early hours of D-Day, 6 June 1944. Alun was killed during the capture of the battery that day. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Bayeux Memorial, France. Alun is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

D. Davies, Royal Navy. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

David Aeron Davies, Able Seaman, P/JX 224550, Royal Navy. David served on the destroyer HMS Beverley which saw service in the North Atlantic. Whilst providing escort for convoy ON 176 southwest of Iceland she sustained serious damage in a collision with SS Cairnvalona causing her to drop to the rear of the convoy. Two days later, on 11 April 1943 and with her anti-submarine gear damaged she was hit by a torpedo during a night attack by U-188, and sank with the loss of 151 lives. David was 25 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Gladys Mary Davies, Aircraftwoman 2nd Class, 2078237, Women's Auxiliary Air Force. Gladys was the daughter of John Llewelyn Davies and Annie Davies, of Penparke, Aberystwyth. She served with the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, and died on active service at Gloucester on 10 August 1942. Gladys was just 19 years old, and was brought home for burial at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Ivor Davies, Private, 5628899, Devonshire Regiment. Ivor was the son of John and Elizabeth Davies, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Mary E. Davies, of Llanafan. He served with the 11th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. Ivor served with the battalion in the campaign in Burma. He was killed in Burma on 11 April 1944, aged 33, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

 

Walter John Davies, Gunner, 1078723, Royal Artillery. Walter was the son of William and Annie Elizabeth Davies, of Aberystwyth. He served with 600 (5th Bn. The Duke of Wellington's Regt. [West Riding]) Regiment, Royal Artillery. Walter landed in Normandy with the unit in June 1944, and took part in the advance through northern France after the break-out from the Normandy beach-head. On 15 April 1945, Walter's unit took part in an operation to destroy a German garrison which was still holding out on the Channel coast, north of Dunkirk. He was killed in action hat day, aged 37, and is buried in Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium.

 

George Samuel Achille Didier, Officer Cadet, 798380, Royal Artillery. George was the son of Achille and Kate R. Didier, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Lilian Didier. He was an Officer Cadet with the Royal Artillery, and served in North Africa. George died in Egypt on 13 December 1942, aged 27, and is buried at Heliopolis War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Gordon Robert Duncan, Flight Sergeant, R/69109, Royal Canadian Air Force. Gordon was the son of Orval Stanley and Margaret Beatrice Duncan, of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He served as an Air Observer with the Royal Canadian Air Force. Gordon was killed in a flying accident near Aberystwyth on 10 February 1942, aged 27, and was buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Lawrence George Easto, Private, 3967078, Welch Regiment. Lawrence was the son of Arthur Easto (who had died of wounds in France on 3 December 1917), and of Gertrude May Easto, of Aberystwyth. Lawrence served with the 2nd Battalion, Welch Regiment. The battalion served in Crete, and then in the North African and Italian campaigns during World War Two. Lawrence was wounded at some time during the war, and died at home on 6 March 1945. He was 28 years old, and is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Douglas Malcolm Edwards, Private, 147926, Royal Army Service Corps. Douglas was born at Aberystwyth in 1914. He served with the Royal Army Service Corps. On 17 June 1940, Douglas was among between 4,000 to 8,000 refugees from St Nazaire, a mixture of service personnel and civilians, who embarked on the RMS Lancastria, along with her crew of 250. She had been given leave to depart for Britain, when she was attacked by a German Ju-88, which hit Lancastria with three bombs. The doomed ship rolled over and sunk within twenty minutes, taking down with her many thousands of the souls aboard her. Douglas was 26 years old when he died that day. His body was one of many to be washed ashore over the coming weeks, and he is buried in Escoublac-La-Baule War Cemetery, France.

 

Francis Joseph Edwards, Sergeant, 1316995, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Francis was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Edwards, of Aberystwyth. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 427 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was assigned to No 6 Group, Royal Canadian Air Force. 427 Squadron was a Bomber Command squadron and during the course of the war it flew the Wellington, Halifax and Lancaster bombers. At the time of Francis’ death on 18 April the squadron was flying the Halifax V. He was 23 years of age when he was killed in action over France is buried in Clichy Northern Cemetery, France.

 

Jemuel Richard Edwards, Flight Sergeant, 1286856, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Jemuel was the son of Owen and Ellen Ann Edwards, of Aberystwyth. He served with 296 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The Squadron was formed on 25 January 1942, at RAF Ringway from the Glider Exercise Unit, and moved to Netheravon to tow Hotspur Gliders on training flights. In May 1942 it began to receive Armstrong Whitworth Whitleys. On 8 September 1942, Jemuel was aboard Whitley Serial BD436 of 296 Squadron, and whilst climbing out of the front hatch of the aircraft walked into the airscrew, which was still turning. Jemuel was 24 years old, and was brought home for burial at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Meirion Edwards, Private, 4923315, South Staffordshire Regiment. Meirion was the son of John Griffyth Edwards and Alice Gwendolen Edwards, of Penparke, Aberystwyth. He served with the 1/6th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, which was attached to the 59th (Staffordshire) Division. The division landed in Normandy as part of the Second Army on 26 June 1944, and was employed in the north-western outskirts of Caen, fighting against elements of the 12th SS Panzer Division. Meirion was killed in Normandy on 7 August 1944. He was 30 years old, and is buried in Ryes War Cemetery, Bazenville, France.

 

Thomas Brinley Edwards, Lance Serjeant, 984699, Royal Artillery. Brinley was born on 4 February 1914, the son of Hugh Jenkin Edwards, and of Anne Marie Edwards (nee Jones), of Aberystwyth, and had played football for Aberystwyth FC prior to the war. He served with 11 (Honourable Artillery Company) Regiment, Royal Artillery, which served in North Africa, equipped with Priest self-propelled guns. Brinley was taken prisoner after the fall of Tobruk, and was handed over to the Italians. He was among a number of POWs taken aboard the S.S. Scillin, which sailed from Tripoli for Italy on 14 November 1942. During the night the ship was torpedoed and sunk by the Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sahib, and 783 POWs drowned. Thomas was 28 years old when he died that night, and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

W. R. Edwards, Royal Air Force. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

William Glynne Edwards, Lieutenant, Royal Navy. William was the son of William and Mary Lloyd Edwards, of Aberystwyth and was 31 years of age. He served on the destroyer HMS Harvester. In March 1943 whilst she was providing escort duties for convoy HX 228 in the Atlantic she forced U-444 to the surface before ramming her. Shortly after on 11 March 1943 she was herself attacked by U-432 and broke in half with the loss of 9 officers and 136 ratings. William was amongst those lost and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

Edward Symon Ellis, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. Edward was the son of David and Mary Rachel Ellis, and the husband of Dorothy Ellis, of Holywell, Flintshire. He served aboard HMS Bonaventure, a light Anti Aircraft Cruiser. On 31 March 1941 she was on escort duty with convoy GA-008, from Greece to Alexandria when she was torpedoed and sunk approximately 100 miles south southeast of Crete by the Italian submarine Ambra. Edward was 32 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Eric Glynn Evans, Major, 67683, Royal Artillery. Eric was the son of Ivor and Elizabeth Evans, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 146th (The Pembroke Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. Reformed as field artillery during WW2, the Pembroke Yeomanry’s Cardiganshire Battery became a separate Regiment on the outbreak of the Second World War, and as 146th Field Regiment they landed in Suez in September 1942, joining the Eighth Army in time for the battle of El Alamein, forming part of the 7th Armoured Division. Eric was killed during the final stages of the Tunisian Campaign, on 26 April 1943. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

John Rhys Evans, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1330061, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of David John and Mary Ellen Evans, of Highgate, Middlesex. He served with the Royal Air Force, and died on 25 July 1941, aged 19. John is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Linus Evans, Captain, 217383, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Linus was the son of John and Eleanor Evans, and the husband of Margaret Magdalen Elizabeth Evans, of Aberystwyth. He played football for Aberystwyth FC prior to the war, before becoming commissioned into the 6th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion landed on the Normandy beaches on the end of June 1944, attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division, and took part in the break-out from the Normandy beach-head. It then played an important role in the advance through Northern France into Belgium and Holland. Linus was killed whilst fighting around the Reichswald Forest on 8 February 1945. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Thomas Edward Evans, Leading Aircraftman, 1419519, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of Evan Richard and Emmie Elizabeth Evans, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. Thomas died at Aberystwyth on 6 January 1943, aged 19, and is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

John Roger Eyton-Morgan, Flying Officer (Pilot), 162004, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Thomas and Nellie White Eyton-Morgan, of Fronhyfryd, Aberystwyth. He served as a Pilot with 144 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. The squadron was a Coastal Command unit, equipped with the Bristol Beaufighter. On 26 April 1915, John was flying his Beaufighter during an operation over Feda Fjord, Norway when it crashed, killing John and his Navigator, Flight Sergeant Knox. John was 21 years old, and is buried at Feda Churchyard, Norway, alongside his Navigator.

 

Michael Barry Fowler, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1270304, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Michael was the son of David William and Edith Piper Fowler, of Aberystwyth. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force, and was posted to Canada under the Empire Air Training Scheme. Michael was killed in Canada on 12 March 1943, aged 18, and is buried at Medicine Hat (Hillside) Cemetery, Alberta, Canada. Michael is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Daniel Ernest George, Pilot Officer, 121564, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Daniel, known as Ernest, was born in 1910, the son of Daniel Henry George and of Agnes Lilly George, of 7, Skinner Street, Aberystwyth. He was residing at 5, Salisbury Road, Wrexham at the outbreak of war, with his wife, Joan George, before enlisting into the Royal Air Force, and becoming a Pilot. Daniel then served with 540 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a photo-reconnaissance unit, equipped with the Supermarine Spitfire IV. Daniel was posted as missing presumed killed when he failed to return after an operation on 3 April 1943. He was 32 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Geoffrey Leavitt Govier, Private, 1479550, Army Catering Corps. Geoffrey was the son of Ralph and Blanche Govier, of Wallasey, and the husband of Elsie Lavinia Govier, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Army Catering Corps, and died in London on 10 March 1946, aged 31. Geoffrey is buried at Wallasey (Rake Lane) Cemetery, Lancashire. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Thomas David Irfon Griffith, Captain, 176104, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of John Albert and Margaret Ann Griffith, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Mary Flora Griffith, of Llanfihangel Talyllyn, Brecknockshire. He served with the 6th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion was a TA unit, attached to 158th Infantry Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, and landed in Normandy at the end of June 1944. The division then took part in the fighting in the Bocage, and the subsequent break-out from the Normandy beach-head. Between 15 and 17 July 1944 Operation Greenline took place, which was designed to capture the high ground around Bougy, Evrecy, and Maizet, south of the Odon. For this operation the 158th Infantry Brigade came under command of the 15th (Scottish) Division. Thomas was killed during the 6th RWF attack on Evrecy on 17 July 1944. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Bayeux Memorial, France.

 

Gerallt Tegwyn Griffith, Flying Officer, 80889, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gerallt was born in 1896, the son of William Gwyn and Annie Griffith. Prior to the war he lived with his wife, Gwyneth Elizabeth Griffith, at The Bay Hotel, Aberystwyth. He was commissioned as a Flying Officer on 20 October 1923, and served with the Royal Air Force for several years prior to the outbreak of war. On 14 June 1940, Gerallt rejoined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, after being re-commissioned as a Flying Officer. After the invasion of Europe on 6 June 1944, Gerallt joined the invasion forces as part of the RAF Regiment, and took part in the liberation of Holland. On 17 December 1944, he was enjoying a night off, and was watching a film at the Rex Cinema in Antwerp when the building was hit by a German V2 rocket, which killed almost 600 people. Gerallt was 48 years old, and is buried in Schoonselhof Cemetery near Antwerpen, Holland.

 

John Illingworth Hollings, Officer Cadet, 6477407, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). John was the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hollings, of Aberystwyth. He was serving as an Officer Cadet with the Royal Fusiliers when he died on active service on 16 May 1942. John was 21 years old, and is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Gwynne Morgan Hughes, Driver, T/220892, Royal Army Service Corps. Gwynne was the son of David James Hughes and Annie Hughes, of Aberystwyth. He served during the war with the Royal Army Service Corps. Gwynne survived the war, but died on 6 January 1947. He was 35 years old, and is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Hector Morgan Hughes, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Hector was born at Aberystwyth in 1903. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Llanashe, a London registered Cargo Steamer. On 17 February 1943, Llanashe was on route from New York via Busreh and Bendar Abbas for Port Elizabeth, carrying a cargo of 3,500 tons of tin plate and aluminium, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-182 and sunk with the loss of 28 lives. Hector was 39 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated alongside his fellow crew-men on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Oswald James Hughes, Able Seaman, C/JX 241255, Royal Navy. Oswald was the son of Oswald and Edith Hughes, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Navy, and was posted aboard the SS Walnut, a merchant steamer. On 27 October 1941, Walnut left Liverpool for Newry, carrying a cargo of coal. She was never seen again, and was declared as a war loss. Oswald was 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

William James Hughes, Seaman, LT/JX 206369, Royal Naval Patrol Service. William was the son of John William and Catherine Mary Hughes, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Jane Olwen Hughes, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard HM Trawler Bredon. Bredon was a Hill class naval trawler that served as an anti-submarine escort trawler. On 8 February 1943 she was working off the Canary Islands, when she was sunk by the German submarine U-521, with the loss of 41 lives. William was 32 years old when he died, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

Owen Henry Humphreys, Captain, 244160, General List. Owen was known as Harry, and was the son of Owen and Caroline Humphreys, of Aberystwyth. He was commissioned from the Royal Army Service Corps on 26 August 1942, joining the General List of officers. Harry took part in the Normandy invasion, and the ensuing liberation of Belgium and Holland in 1944. He was killed near Brussels on 7 December 1944, aged 33, and is buried in Brussels Town Cemetery, Belgium. Within a month of his death, Harry was Mentioned in Despatches for his services in Northwest Europe.

 

David Dennis James, Telegraphist, D/JX 211773, Royal Navy. David served with the Royal Navy aboard the frigate HMS Mourne. On 15 June 1944, Mourne was in action, supporting the Normandy Landings, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-767 in the English Channel. Three days later, whilst still in the channel, the U-Boat was to suffer a similar fate when she was hunted down by British destroyers with depth charges, and sunk. David is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

John Herbert James, Fusilier, 4204148, Royal Welch Fusiliers. John was the son of Hugh Owen James and Elizabeth James, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 70th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, which was a young soldiers battalion. John died on active service at Sleaford, Lincolnshire on 19 May 1943, aged 26. John was brought home for burial at Penygarn Calvinistic Methodist Cemetery, Tirymynach.

 

John Samuel Jarman, Sergeant, 1617852, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was born at Aberystwyth in 1908, the son of Thomas Edward Jarman and Esther Jarman. At some time between the wars, the family had moved to 7, Cumberland Road, Swindon. During 1939, John joined the Royal Air Force, and worked at the Air Ministry as an Air Service Assistant Clerk. John died at the RAF Hospital at Wroughton, Wiltshire on 24 November 1944. He was 35 years old, and is buried in Swindon (Christ Church) Burial Ground.

 

Harry Jeffrey Jeffcoat, Flying Officer, 79240, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Harry was the son of Harry and Dora Minnie Jeffcoat, of Aberystwyth. He had fought during the Battle of Britain with 236 Squadron, before being posted to 44 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Hampden. Harry was killed when his Hamden, Serial AE196, was lost over the sea while on a mission to Brest Harbour on 13 December 1941. He was 32 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Harry is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Evan James Jenkins, Leading Seaman, LT/5806D, Royal Naval Reserve (Patrol Service). Evan was the son of David and Jane Jenkins of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Anice Nora Jenkins, of Cardiff. He served with the Royal Naval Reserve, and was mobilised at the outbreak of war, joining the Royal Naval Patrol Service. Evan was posted aboard HM Trawler Rubens. Rubens was an anti-submarine trawler, which had been taken over by the Admiralty in August 1940. On 21 February 1941, Rubens was operating about 230 miles south-west of Ireland when she was attacked and sunk by a German Focke-Wulf 200. Evan was 36 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

G. Jenkins, Royal Artillery. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

Leslie Howard Jenkins, Sergeant, 577165, Royal Air Force. Leslie was born at Aberystwyth in 1922, the son of George and Bessie Jenkins. He volunteered to serve with the Royal Air Force, and served as a Flight Engineer with 90 Squadron. The squadron had reformed in early May 1941, and became part of No. 2 Group RAF, becoming equipped with the Boeing Flying Fortress Mk.1. Early experience with this aircraft proved to be unsuccessful, and the squadron re-equipped with the Bristol Blenheim. In November 1942 the Squadron reformed as part of No. 3 (Bomber) Group, equipped with Short Stirling Mk.I, and began mining sorties in January 1943. Leslie was killed when his Stirling was lost on one such operation on 4 February 1943. He was 20 years old, and is buried in Montfoort General Cemetery, Utrecht, Netherlands.

 

David Lloyd Jones, Flight Sergeant, 975131, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the husband of Gwendoline Eva Jones, and the son of John William and Elizabeth Ann Jones, of Aberystwyth. He worked in the National Library of Wales prior to the war. David enlisted into the Royal Air Force, and became a Navigator with 115 Squadron. From the spring of 1943 onwards the squadron flew the Avro Lancaster. David died at Ely, Cambridgeshire on 19 April 1944, aged 30, possibly dying after returning from a mission. He was brought home for burial in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

David Thomas Jones, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1120283, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of William and Elizabeth Jones, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Molly Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. David died on active service at Swansea on 12 April 1943, aged 35, and was brought home for burial at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Edgar John Jones, Private, D/37528, South Wales Borderers. Edgar was the son of Edwin and Sofia Jones of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Florence May Jones, of Bedwellty. He served with the 5th (H.D.) Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion formed in 1939 for Home Defence duties. Edgar died on active service on 13 November 1941, aged 48. He is buried in Bedwellty (St. Sannan) Churchyard.

 

Emrys Davies Jones, Captain, 177657, Parachute Regiment. Emrys was the son of Thomas Edwin Samuel and Mary Gwladys Jones, and the husband of Margaretta Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 6th Battalion, Parachute Regiment, Army Air Corps, which had been formed from the 10th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion's first action was during Operation Slapstick, at the port of Taranto, Italy. Emrys was killed when the battalion captured Mottola on 10 September 1943. He was 28 years old and is commemorated on the Cassino Memorial, Italy. Emrys is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Evan Morgan Jones, Seaman, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of John James Jones, Coal Merchant, of 6, Queen Street, Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy, and was home on leave when he accidentally drowned at Aberystwyth on 5 July 1942, aged 31. He is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

 

George Rowland Jones, Sergeant, 3909865, South Wales Borderers. George was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served in the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was the only Welsh unit to land on D-Day, landing at Le Hamel, near Arromanches on the Normandy coast at midday on 6 June 1944. In September the battalion was part of the force that was ordered to seize the port of Le Havre. Its task was particularly challenging, consisting of capturing three woods on a ridge heavily defended by the Germans with trenches, mines, concrete dug outs and wire. After two days of bitter fighting the Borderers had successfully achieved their objective and Le Havre was in Allied hands. Sadly George was killed here on 11 September 1944, aged 26. He is buried in Ste Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France.

 

Gwilym Louis Gobert Jones, Second Officer, Merchant Navy. Gwilym was known as Louis, and was the son of Lieutenant Gwilym Jones and of Margaret Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Tymeric, a Glasgow registered steamer. On the morning of 23 November 1940, Tymeric was in convoy OB-244, carrying a cargo of coal from Hull to Buenos Aires, when she was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-123, and sank in flames with the loss of 71 lives. Louis was 24 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Harold Frederick Jones, Flying Officer, 54704, Royal Air Force. Harold was the son of Amy Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served as an Air Gunner with 622 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster Mark III. On 6 November 1944, Harold took off in a Lancaster which formed part of a force of 738 aircraft which attacked the Nordstern synthetic-oil plant. Harold's Lancaster was lost during the raid. Harold is buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery, Germany. Harold is commemorated on his parents grave at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

John James Jones, Royal Air Force. John cannot presently be identified, but he was reported as missing during February 1945.

 

Louis Fleming Jones, M.A., Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Louis was the son of Edward and Elizabeth Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Navy aboard H.M. Submarine Simoom. Simoom went on patrol from Port Said to the Aegean on 2 November 1943. Three days later she was diverted to the entrance of the Dardanelles Straits. She was supposed to have the returned to port, but was never seen again. The Admiralty declared her as having officially been lost on 19 November 1943. The cause of her loss has never been verified. Louis was 24 years old when he died, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Richard Trefor Jones, Gunner, 1832882, Royal Artillery. Richard was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Jane Jones, and the husband of Florence Ena Jones, of Caeffynon, Aberystwyth. He served with 145 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. Richard died at Aberystwyth Hospital on 13 June 1945. He was 42 years old, and is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Robert Norman Jones, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 553482, Royal Air Force. Robert was the son of Gwladys Jones, of Wombourne, and the foster-son of Hannah J. Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. Robert died on active service on 10 December 1941, aged 18 and is buried at Wombourne (St. Benedict) Churchyard, Staffordshire. Robert is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Stanley Jones, Driver, 14429117, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Stanley was the son of Owen and Florence Jones, of Aberystwyth. Stanley was accidentally killed on 3 December 1943, aged 18. He is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Ivor Martin Kendall, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1470879, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Ivor was the son of Ivor J. Kendall and Sarah Kendall, of Ponterwyd. He served with the Royal Air Force at the Apprentices Training Unit at RAF Halton. Ivor died on actice service at Aylesbury on 10 January 1942. He was 19 years old, and was brought home for burial at Yspytty Cynfyn (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard.

 

David Richard Doughton Lewis, Seaman, LT/JX 205200, Royal Naval Patrol Service. David was the son of Edward Thomas Lewis and Elizabeth Sarah Ann Lewis, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Frances Rowlands Lewis, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard the mine sweeper HM Trawler Orfasy. During the night of 21 October 1943 Orfasy, whilst escorting the Danish tanker Litiopa, was heard to have fired two depth charges at the German U-Boat U-68, but was immediately hit by a torpedo which she had fired, and exploded, sinking with al hands, about 185 miles southeast of Freetown off the African coast. David was 31 years of age when he died on 22 October 1943, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

Dennys Markham Lewis, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Dennys was the son of Edward Thomas and Elizabeth Sarah Anne Lewis of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy, aboard SS Empire Heron, a London registered cargo steamer. On 15 October 1941, Empire Heron was in convoy SC-48, which was crossing the Atlantic on route to Manchester with a cargo of sulphur. Waiting in mid Atlantic was a German U boat pack, which attacked the convoy. Empire Heron was struck on the starboard side by two torpedoes fired by U-568, causing her to sink with the loss of 42 of her 43 crew. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

George Daniel Lewis, Sailor, Merchant Navy. Dan was the son of William and Margaret Lewis, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS George H Jones, a London Registered steamer. She had joined convoy SL-111 at Freetown and was carrying a cargo of fuel oil bound for the Isle of Arran. Sometime after leaving Freetown she was ordered to make for the Azores after developing engine trouble which forced her to drop out of the Convoy. On the morning of 11 June 1942, SS George H Jones was intercepted by the German submarine U-455 off the Azores, which torpedoed and sunk her. Nineteen crew and the captain were picked up and landed back in Freetown. A further 20 survivors were picked up and landed at Londonderry. Dan and a DEMS gunner were lost in the sinking. Dan was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Trevor Evans and Jack Sweeney of Llanon were ship mates of Dan’s, and both managed to get into a lifeboat. Despite a lack of food, water and shelter the pair were fortunately rescued two days later.

 

John Norman Madeley, Private, 5833836, Cambridgeshire Regiment. John was born at Aberystwyth in 1914, the son of Thomas and Mary Ann Madeley. His father was from Market Drayton, but had worked in the town for several years prior to the First World War. John served with the 2nd Battalion, Cambridgeshire Regiment. The battalion had spent the early years of the war on home service, before sailing for the Far East on 31 August 1941. On 13 January 1942 the convoy carrying the battalion, and other units, reached Singapore, and the troops disembarked. The battalion was immediately thrown into heavy fighting during the Japanese assault on Singapore, which was surrendered to the Japanese on 15 February 1942. John was taken into captivity and put to work on the Thai-Burma Railway. John died as a PoW on 12 January 1943, aged 28. He is buried in Chungkai War Cemetery, Thailand. John is not commemorated at Aberystwyth. His parents later moved to North Watford, Watford, Hertfordshire.

 

David Mann, Engineman, LT/KX 125167, Royal Naval Patrol Service. David was born at Pwllheli in 1921, the son of Richard Mann and Catherine Mann (nee Roberts), of Pwllheli. He married Florence Parry, of Aberystwyth in 1942. David served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Birdlip, an anti-submarine trawler. On 13 June 1944, Birdlip was on patrol off Greenville, Liberia, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-547. David was 23 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.          

 

John Powell Middlehurst, MID, Flying Officer, 41605, Royal Air Force. John was the son of Richard Foster Middlehurst and Dorothy Elizabeth Middlehurst, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Joan Middlehurst. He served in 113 Squadron, Royal Air Force, during which time he was mentioned in despatches. In the summer of 1941 the squadron was based in north Africa and were equipped with the Bristol Blenheim. Duties ranged from strafing enemy convoys, bombing airfields and enemy harbours. John was killed when his aircraft was lost on a mission on 2 July 1941, aged 21. He is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

Kathleen Miller, Third Officer, Women's Royal Naval Service. Kathleen was born on 5 May 1907, the daughter of Henry and Jane Anne Miller, of Sunny Side, Llanbadarn Fawr. The CWGC show that she later resided at Englefield Green, Surrey, but this cannot be confirmed. Kathleen served with the Women's Royal Naval Service, and was posted to HMS Cormorant, a receiving ship, which was moored at Gibraltar. Kathleen died at sea aboard the S.S. Aquila on 19 August 1941, when the ship was torpedoed by the German submarine U-201 in the Bay of Biscay. She was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Ronald Henry Morgan, Leading Aircraftsman, 1381382, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Ronald was the son of Henry George and Mabel Morgan, of Birmingham. He served with the Royal Air Force. On 16 May 1941, Ronald was flying aboard a Tiger Moth, Serial T5712 of 9 EFTS, when it hit a balloon cable and crashed at Walsgrave. Both Ronald and his pilot were killed. Ronald was 28 years old, and was buried with full military honours in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Albert Ronald Oxenham, Pilot Officer, 176286, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Albert was born in Dalston, London on 8 September 1917, the son of Henry John and Sarah Jane Oxenham. He worked as a Policeman for Essex Constabulary prior to the war and married Phyllis Joan Davies, of Aberystwyth in 1943. Albert joined the Royal Air Force, and qualified as a Pilot before being posted to 100 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. On the night of 21 May 1944 Albert took off from RAF Grimsby bound for Duisberg, flying Lancaster I, Serial ME-677. The aircraft was brought down the following morning, early on 22 May 1944, killing Albert and five other crewmen. Albert was 27 years old, and is buried alongside his crewmates at Schoonselhof Cemetery, Belgium. Albert is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

John Albert Parker, Gunner, 14250467, Royal Artillery. John was the son of John Holbrooke Parker and Florence Gertrude Parker, of Grays, Essex. Little is known of Albert, but he died at Aberystwyth on 14 December 1942, aged 18, and is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. John is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

John Daniel Parry, Stoker, LT/KX 125170, Royal Naval Patrol Service. John was the husband of Rhoda Lilian Parry, of Gorleston, Norfolk. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard HMS Southern Flower, an anti submarine trawler. On 3 March 1945, Southern Flower was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-1022 off Reykjavik, Iceland. John was 23 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

William John Phippen, Sergeant, 913952, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Ernest George and Dorothy L. A. Phippen, of Hutton, Somerset. He served with 57 Squadron, Royal Air Force, and had married Margaret Myrtle Jones, of Aberystwyth, in 1942. The Squadron was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Vickers Wellington, and took part in the strategic night bombing offensive. William was killed when his Wellington went missing on 30 June 1942. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. William is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Gareth Pryse-Howell, Sergeant, 1282866, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gareth was the son of John P. Howell and Phyllis P. Howell, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. Gareth was killed on 12 October 1942, probably whilst part of the crew of a Bristol Beaufort. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

John Catton Rea, Second Lieutenant, 135975, Royal Engineers. John was the son of John Charles and Florence Isabel Rea, of Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. John was serving with the Royal Engineers, and was based near Chelmsford when he was killed on 27 July 1940, aged 31. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey. John is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Gwilym David Rees, Private, 14415287, Welch Regiment. Gwilym served with the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was the Carmarthenshire TA battalion, and was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. At the end of June 1944 the division landed in Normandy, taking part in the terrible fighting in the Bocage. It then took part in the epic drive through Northern France into Belgium and through Holland. Gwilym was killed during the fight to capture s'Hertogenbosch on 23 October 1944. He was 19 years old, and is buried in Uden War Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

Henry Albert Richards, Warrant Officer Class II (B.S.M.), 1489341, Royal Artillery. Henry was the son of Henry Albert and Elizabeth Louisa Richards, and the husband of Ethel Richards, of Aberystwyth. He served with 144 Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was based in Fifeshire. Henry died on active service on 9 February 1945, aged 46, and is buried at Dunfermline Cemetery, Scotland. Henry is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Eric Charles Roberts, Gunner, 907348, Royal Artillery. Eric was the son of John T. and Jennie Roberts of Aberystwyth, Cardiganshire. He served with 146 (Pembroke Yeomanry) Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery. Reformed as field artillery, the Pembroke Yeomanry’s Cardiganshire Battery became a separate Regiment on the outbreak of the Second World War, and was numbered the 146th Field Regiment. They landed in Suez in September 1942, joining the Eighth Army in time for the battle of El Alamein, then forming part of the 7th Armoured Division Artillery until the ‘Desert Rats’ left Italy in 1944. Converted to medium artillery in England, the Regiment disembarked in France in July 1944, taking part in the drive through Northern France into Belgium and Holland. Eric was killed in action on 2 Nov 1944, aged 25, and is buried in Venray War Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

Gerald Brinley Roberts, Sergeant, 651715, Royal Air Force. Gerald was the son of William Evan and Ercilla Roberts. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 77 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The squadron was employed on reconnaissance and Security Patrols during the early months of the war. Gerald was killed when his aircraft was shot down over Germany on 28 June 1941. He was 24 years old, and is buried in Hamburg Cemetery, Germany.

 

Thomas Glyn Roberts, Gunner, 1717208, Royal Artillery. Thomas was the son of William and Priscilla Roberts, and the husband of E. M. Roberts, of Aberystwyth. He served with 239 Battery, 77 Heavy Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was a TA unit, raised in South Wales. On 6 December 1941, the regiment sailed in Convoy WS14 from the Clyde bound for the Middle East. By the time the Convoy had reached Durban, the destination of the Regiments had been changed to Singapore, and again to Djakarta, in Java, and the Convoy reached its destination on 4 February 1942. 239 Battery moved by road and rail to Surabaja, in Eastern Java and went into action in that area in February 1942. Thomas was captured by the Japanese in Java when it capitulated in March 1942. He survived over two years in captivity, but died as a POW on 8 November 1944, aged 33. Thomas is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore.

 

William Glyndwr Roberts, Gunner, 1133737, Royal Artillery. William served with 4 Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment had served in the North African campaign. In July 1943, with the Axis forces in North Africa defeated, 4th Regiment returned to England to train for the invasion of Europe. William was killed during the fighting to break out of the Normandy beach-head on 17 July 1944. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Tilly-Sur-Seulles War Cemetery, Calvados, France.

 

Evan John Stephens, Sergeant, 967065, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John served with the 335th Fighter Group, Royal Air Force, which was based at RAF Steeple Morden, in Cambridgeshire. Evan was reported as missing, believed killed on active service on 24 August 1940. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Bryan Robert Thomas, Sergeant, 1051799, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Bryan was the son of Edward Campbell Thomas, of Briarley, Iorwerth Avenue, Aberystwyth. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 142 Squadron, Royal Air Force. In 1941 the squadron was flying the Vickers Wellington, on strategic night bombing missions. Bryan was killed in action when his Wellington was brought down over northern Europe on 21 October 1941. He was 29 years old, and is buried in Sage War Cemetery, Germany. The cemetery in made up of many airmen, most of whom were lost in bombing raids over northern Europe, who were brought in from other cemeteries after the war were for reburial.

 

Harold Thomas, Chief Officer, Merchant Marine. Harold was the son of Captain Thomas and Sarah Ann Thomas, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Ocean Crusader, a British registered Liberty ship. On 26 November 1942, she was on her maiden voyage from Portland, Maine, to Avonmouth, UK, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-262, northeast of St John’s, Newfoundland. Due to heavy weather she was a straggler from the main convoy, HX-216, and went down with all hands on 26 November 1942. Harold was 43 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

David Thomas Aaron Tinnuche, Private, 7608236, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. David was the son of Gwilym and Sarah Tinnuche, of Llanelli. He married Sarah Jane Ruthetta Charman, of Aberystwyth, in 1940. David served with 14 Army Ordnance Depot, Royal Army Ordnance Corps, which landed at Sword Beach on D-Day, 6 June 1944. David was killed months later, on 26 September 1944. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, France. David is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Edward Hammond Whitehouse, Flight Lieutenant, 42035, Royal Air Force. Edward was the son of Wallace Edward and Mabel Whitehouse, of Aberystwyth. He served as a Pilot with 264 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was reformed on 8 December 1939 at Martlesham Heath, to bring the Boulton Paul Defiant fighter into service. Operations began in March 1940 when the squadron started convoy patrols. After initial successes the Luftwaffe soon realised that the Defiant was vulnerable to frontal attack, and the squadron started to have heavy losses of aircraft and crew. Edward was killed when his Defiant Mark I, Serial L6959 was shot down by a Messerschmitt Me109 on 28 May 1940. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Douglas Eric Whitfield, Corporal, 7891029, Royal Armoured Corps. Douglas was the son of Harry Oswald Whitfield, and of Marie Whitfield, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 5th Royal Tank Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps. As part of 1st Armoured Division, 5th Royal Tank Regiment went to France in 1940, and after losing most its tanks during the retreat to Dunkirk, rebuilt before moving to North Africa. Douglas was killed on the Second Battle of El Alamein, on 24 November 1941. He was 22 years old and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt. Douglas is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Kenneth Jarratt Wilkinson, Bombardier, 927666, Royal Artillery. Kenneth was the son of Charles Richard and Florence May Wilkinson, of Aberystwyth. He served with 146 (The Pembroke Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. The 146th Field Regiment was raised in Cardiganshire, and joined the Eighth Army in time to take part in the Battle of El Alamein. Afterwards it became part of the 7th Armoured Division, taking part in the advance to Tripoli, and helping defeat Rommel's counter-attack at Medenine. The Regiment fought with the Desert Rats until the fall of Tunis in May 1943. Kenneth was killed here on 8 May 1943. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Massicault War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

D. Edwin Williams, Merchant Navy. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

David John Williams, OBE, Master, Merchant Navy. David was the son of David Williams, and of Annie Williams, of Aberystwyth. He was a long serving Mariner, and had been awarded the Lloyd's Medal for lifesaving at sea, and also created an Officer of the British Empire. David served as Master of the SS Empire Tower, a London registered cargo steamer. On 5 March 1943, she was on route from Huelva and Gibraltar for Middlesbrough when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-130, and sunk with the loss of 38 lives. David was 38 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated alongside his crew on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Matilda Ann Wraight, Civilian. Matilda was the daughter Charles and Emily Knott, of Aberystwyth. She lived with her husband Walter Wraight at Coburg Buildings, Westminster, London. Matilda was severely injured during the Blitz on 16 November 1940, and died that same day at Westminster Hospital, aged 52. She is buried at Westminster. Matilda is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Ernest Alfred Wright, Warrant Officer Class II, 5102277, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Ernest was the Husband of Gwyneth May Wright, of Aberystwyth. Ernest served as Company Sergeant Major with the 1/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The battalion had been in France in 1940, and was evacuated from Dunkirk. It landed at Sword Beach on 29 June 1944, and took part in the fighting around Caen. Ernest was killed here on 8 July 1944, aged 39, and is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, France. Ernest is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

George Henry Wynne, Sergeant, 847519, Royal Air Force (Auxiliary Air Force). George was the son of Edward Price Wynne and Emma Gertrude Wynne, of Trefechan, Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force as a Navigator. George was one of three men who died in an aircraft accident whilst training at RAF Lossiemouth on 4 August 1942. He was 30 years old, and is buried in Lossiemouth Burial Ground, Scotland.

Website News

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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