West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Aberystwyth WW2 War Memorial

Aberystwyth is a historic market town, which sits in a picturesque location, midway up the west coast of Wales, overlooking Cardigan Bay. It is the administrative centre for Ceredigion, and is also home to the renowned Aberystwyth University, and to the National Library of Wales. Although at first sight a modern town, Aberystwyth is home to a Norman Castle, which dates from 1109 AD. Set in the grounds of the Castle is the impressive Borough War Memorial, which is dedicated to the townspeople of Aberystwyth who fell during both world wars. Please see the details below for further information.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Alexander John Aitken, Private, 6447508, Army Catering Corps. Alexander was the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Aitken, and the husband of Ellen Dorothy Aitken, of Hounslow, Middlesex. Alexander was attached to the 9th King's Liverpool Regiment when he died on active service at Blackpool on 5 February 1945, aged 55. He was buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. Alexander is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

David Campbell Anderson, Flying Officer, 400453, Royal Australian Air Force. David was born on 5 February 1914, the son of David and Florence Campbell Anderson, of Horsham, Victoria, Australia. He enlisted into the Royal Australian Air Force, and embarked from Australia for England, joining 1 Operational Squadron, Royal Air Force. David was killed in an accident while piloting a Lockheed Hudson III, Serial V9127, on 10 February 1942, aged 28. His three fellow crewmen were also killed; Sgt G.R. Duncan, Sgt J.H. Harker, and Sgt R. Hodgson. David was buried with full military honours at Aberystwyth Cemetery. David is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

Derek Jones Bates, Flight Sergeant, 1684954, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Derek was the son of Henry Walter and Lilian Scandrett Bates, of Hale Cheshire. He served with 114 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, which was based in the Mediterranean area from 1942 through to 1945, equipped with the Douglas Boston. The squadron took part in the invasion of North Africa and had moved to mainland Italy at the time Derek went missing in action on 21 February 1945. He was 23 years of age and is commemorated on the Malta Memorial, Malta.

John Lloyd Bebb, Captain, Air Transport Auxiliary. John was born on 4 July 1901, the son of William Bruce Bebb and Elizabeth Bebb of Capel Bangor, and the husband of Laura Jane Bebb, of Aberystwyth. He obtained his pilot's license in 1932, and went on to serve with the Air Transport Auxiliary, a civilian organisation that ferried new, repaired and damaged military aircraft between factories, assembly plants, and transatlantic delivery points. John died at Throckmorton, Worcestershire on 30 January 1942, aged 40, and is buried at Capel Madog Methodist Chapelyard.

Ronald John Beck, Fusilier, 834197, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Ronald was the son of William and Louisa Beck, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion was on the Belgian frontier at the outbreak of war, and took part in the retreat to Dunkirk. Ronald was probably involved in this epic evacuation, and died as a result on 31 May 1940. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Shorncliffe Military Cemetery, England.

 

Herman Benson, Leading Writer, D/MX 67836, Royal Navy. Herman was the son of Russell Heber Benson and Elizabeth Benson, of Aberystwyth. He served on the Cruiser HMS Charybdis, which had been commissioned in December 1941. In 1942 she did valuable service in the Mediterranean, as an escort ship during the important Malta Convoys. In October 1943 she was part of a force sent to intercept the German blockade runner Munsterlund off the Britanny coast, but during the night a flotilla of German torpedo boats attacked the Charybdis and the other vessels and made off into the night. The Charybdis was sunk with the loss of 30 officers and 432 ratings. Herman was 23 years of age when he lost his life on 23 October 1943 and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

John Bolden, Captain, 168432, Royal Artillery. John was the son of Fred and Clara Annie Bolden, and the husband of Elsie May Bolden, of Church End, Finchley Middlesex. John had served with 13 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery during the war, and died at Aberystwyth on 1 May 1946, aged 52. He is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. John is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

William George Boyce, Steward, P/LX 573258, Royal Navy. William was born at Aberystwyth in 1909, the son of Edward and Mary Ann Boyce. He married Clarice Taylor at Atcham, Shrewsbury in 1935. William served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Pylades, a Catherine Class Minesweeper. On 8 July 1944, Pylades was operating off Juno Beach when two explosions rocked her, causing her to sink. William was killed during the sinking that day. He was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire. The cause of the explosions was at the time thought to have been caused by mines, but recent research carried out during a dive carried out by Channel 4's programme Shipwreck Detectives, indicates that she had been torpedoed.

 

Thomas John Brodigan, Fusilier, 859495, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of Richard and E. A. Brodigan, of Penparke. He served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion had taken part in the retreat to Dunkirk during the beginning of war, and after being rebuilt had been sent to the Far East, taking part in the Burmese Campaign. Thomas was killed in Burma on 18 March 1943. He was 24 years old and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

David Bryson, Corporal, Royal Air Force. David was the son of Andrew and Christina Bryson, Scottish emigrants who had moved to Vancouver. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force and was killed in a flying accident near Aberystwyth on 8 August 1943, aged 22. David is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. David is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

Edward Bertie Bull, Lieutenant, Royal Navy. Edward was the son of Edward George and Alice Henrietta Bull, and the husband of Gertrude Mary Vaughan Bull, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Navy aboard HM Submarine Grampus, a mine-laying submarine. She served off China before moving to the Mediterranean in 1940. On 24 June 1940, Grampus was laying mines in the Syracuse and Augusta, Sicily area when she was spotted by the Italian torpedo boat Circe, which was on anti-submarine patrol with three other vessels. After a short fight, Grampus was destroyed, and sank with the loss of all hands. Edward was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Kenneth Rees Burbeck, Flying Officer (Pilot), Royal Air Force. Kenneth was born at Aberystwyth in 1920, the son of John Edward Burbeck, DCM, and Frances Emily Burbeck, of Shirley, Birmingham. Kenneth trained as a Pilot at the start of the war, and was commissioned from Flight Sergeant on 11 February 1943, joining 100 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The squadron was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. On the night of 22 September 1943, Kenneth took off in his Lancaster as part of a group of 711 aircraft that had been despatched to bomb Hanover. He was killed when his Lancaster was shot down over Germany the following morning of 23 September 1943. Kenneth was 23 years old, and is buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Frank Cooley, Gunner, 847924, Royal Artillery. Frank was the son of Richard and Ada Cooley, of Wallsall, Staffordshire, and the husband of Gwladys Cooley, of Aberystwyth. He served with 15 Battery, 6 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was based at Singapore and Java. Frank was taken prisoner when Singapore was surrendered to the Japanese in December 1941, and went into captivity. He was one of 1,100 men who boarded the Japanese 'Hellship' Singapore Maru at Singapore on 30 October 1942, which was bound for Japan, where the men would be used as forced labour. Frank died of exhaustion aboard her on 23 November 1942, aged 25, and was buried at sea. He is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore. Frank is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

Morgan Hugh Garland Coombe, Guardsman, 2738330, Welsh Guards. Morgan was the son of Edward G. and Gwladys Coombe, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Guards. The battalion was formed at Beavers Camp, Hounslow on 24 October 1941, and sailed for North Africa on 5 February 1943, landing in Algiers on 16 February. They joined the 1st Guards Brigade near Medjez El Bab on 1 March 1943. The battalion then took part in the Tunisian Campaign. Morgan was killed during the capture of the town of Hammam Lif on 23 June 1943. He was 22 years old, and is buried in Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

James Edward Curtis, Leading Aircraftman, R/131242, Royal Canadian Air Force. James was the son of James Leonard and Florence Margaret Curtis, and the husband of Elizabeth Curtis, of Burlington, Ontario Canada. He served with the Royal Canadian Air Force, and was killed in a flying accident near Aberystwyth on 26 February 1943. James was buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

William James Daniel, Fusilier, 14320767, Royal Welch Fusiliers. William was the son of David James Daniel and Mary Alice Daniel, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion took part in the Burmese campaign, and it was there that William was killed on 3 February 1945. He was 20 years old, and is buried in Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar.

Alun Meilir Davies, Private, 14635646, Parachute Regiment. Alun was the son of William and Martha Davies, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 9th Battalion, Parachute Regiment, Army Air Corps. The battalion was tasked with the capture of the famous Merville Gun Battery in Normandy, and landed around the area in gliders during the early hours of D-Day, 6 June 1944. Alun was killed during the capture of the battery that day. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Bayeux Memorial, France. Alun is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

David Davies, Able Seaman, D/JX 239630, Royal Navy. David was born on 31 August 1914, the son of Edward and Emily Davies, of 18, Prospect Street, Aberystwyth and the husband of Elsie Rose Davies, of 31, Lewin Road, Bexleyheath, Kent. He served with the Royal Navy aboard the M-Class destroyer HMS Mahratta. She had only been launched in 1943 but had participated in several convoys. On 25 February 1944 Mahratta was escorting Convoy JW 57 which had sailed from Loch Ewe for the Kola Inlet, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-990 while off the Danish coast. David was among 220 men lost in the sinking. He was 29 years old and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

David Aeron Davies, Able Seaman, P/JX 224550, Royal Navy. David served on the destroyer HMS Beverley which saw service in the North Atlantic. Whilst providing escort for convoy ON 176 southwest of Iceland she sustained serious damage in a collision with SS Cairnvalona causing her to drop to the rear of the convoy. Two days later, on 11 April 1943 and with her anti-submarine gear damaged she was hit by a torpedo during a night attack by U-188, and sank with the loss of 151 lives. David was 25 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Gladys Mary Davies, Aircraftwoman 2nd Class, 2078237, Women's Auxiliary Air Force. Gladys was the daughter of John Llewelyn Davies and Annie Davies, of Penparke, Aberystwyth. She served with the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, and died on active service at Gloucester on 10 August 1942. Gladys was just 19 years old, and was brought home for burial at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

 

Ivor Davies, Private, 5628899, Devonshire Regiment. Ivor was the son of John and Elizabeth Davies, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Mary E. Davies, of Llanafan. He served with the 11th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. Ivor served with the battalion in the campaign in Burma. He was killed in Burma on 11 April 1944, aged 33, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

Walter John Davies, Gunner, 1078723, Royal Artillery. Walter was the son of William and Annie Elizabeth Davies, of Aberystwyth. He served with 600 (5th Bn. The Duke of Wellington's Regt. [West Riding]) Regiment, Royal Artillery. Walter landed in Normandy with the unit in June 1944, and took part in the advance through northern France after the break-out from the Normandy beach-head. On 15 April 1945, Walter's unit took part in an operation to destroy a German garrison which was still holding out on the Channel coast, north of Dunkirk. He was killed in action that day, aged 37, and is buried in Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium.

George Samuel Achille Didier, Officer Cadet, 798380, Royal Artillery. George was the son of Achille and Kate R. Didier, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Lilian Didier. He was an Officer Cadet with the Royal Artillery, and served in North Africa. George died in Egypt on 13 December 1942, aged 27, and is buried at Heliopolis War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Gordon Robert Duncan, Flight Sergeant, R/69109, Royal Canadian Air Force. Gordon was the son of Orval Stanley and Margaret Beatrice Duncan, of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He served as an Air Observer with the Royal Canadian Air Force. Gordon was killed in a flying accident near Aberystwyth on 10 February 1942, aged 27, and was buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

Lawrence George Easto, Private, 3967078, Welch Regiment. Lawrence was the son of Arthur Easto (who had died of wounds in France on 3 December 1917), and of Gertrude May Easto, of Aberystwyth. Lawrence served with the 2nd Battalion, Welch Regiment. The battalion served in Crete, and then in the North African and Italian campaigns during World War Two. Lawrence was wounded at some time during the war, and died at home on 6 March 1945. He was 28 years old, and is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Douglas Malcolm Edwards, Private, 147926, Royal Army Service Corps. Douglas was born at Aberystwyth in 1914. He served with the Royal Army Service Corps. On 17 June 1940, Douglas was among between 4,000 to 8,000 refugees from St Nazaire, a mixture of service personnel and civilians, who embarked on the RMS Lancastria, along with her crew of 250. She had been given leave to depart for Britain, when she was attacked by a German Ju-88, which hit Lancastria with three bombs. The doomed ship rolled over and sunk within twenty minutes, taking down with her many thousands of the souls aboard her. Douglas was 26 years old when he died that day. His body was one of many to be washed ashore over the coming weeks, and he is buried in Escoublac-La-Baule War Cemetery, France.

 

Francis Joseph Edwards, Sergeant, 1316995, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Francis was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Edwards, of Aberystwyth. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 427 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was assigned to No 6 Group, Royal Canadian Air Force. 427 Squadron was a Bomber Command squadron and during the course of the war it flew the Wellington, Halifax and Lancaster bombers. At the time of Francis’ death on 18 April the squadron was flying the Halifax V. He was 23 years of age when he was killed in action over France is buried in Clichy Northern Cemetery, France.

 

Jemuel Richard Edwards, Flight Sergeant, 1286856, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Jemuel was the son of Owen and Ellen Ann Edwards, of Aberystwyth. He served with 296 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The Squadron was formed on 25 January 1942, at RAF Ringway from the Glider Exercise Unit, and moved to Netheravon to tow Hotspur Gliders on training flights. In May 1942 it began to receive Armstrong Whitworth Whitleys. On 8 September 1942, Jemuel was aboard Whitley Serial BD436 of 296 Squadron, and whilst climbing out of the front hatch of the aircraft walked into the airscrew, which was still turning. Jemuel was 24 years old, and was brought home for burial at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Meirion Edwards, Private, 4923315, South Staffordshire Regiment. Meirion was the son of John Griffyth Edwards and Alice Gwendolen Edwards, of Penparke, Aberystwyth. He served with the 1/6th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, which was attached to the 59th (Staffordshire) Division. The division landed in Normandy as part of the Second Army on 26 June 1944, and was employed in the north-western outskirts of Caen, fighting against elements of the 12th SS Panzer Division. Meirion was killed in Normandy on 7 August 1944. He was 30 years old, and is buried in Ryes War Cemetery, Bazenville, France.

 

Thomas Brinley Edwards, Lance Serjeant, 984699, Royal Artillery. Brinley was born on 4 February 1914, the son of Hugh Jenkin Edwards, and of Anne Marie Edwards (nee Jones), of Aberystwyth, and had played football for Aberystwyth FC prior to the war. He served with 11 (Honourable Artillery Company) Regiment, Royal Artillery, which served in North Africa, equipped with Priest self-propelled guns. Brinley was taken prisoner after the fall of Tobruk, and was handed over to the Italians. He was among a number of POWs taken aboard the S.S. Scillin, which sailed from Tripoli for Italy on 14 November 1942. During the night the ship was torpedoed and sunk by the Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sahib, and 783 POWs drowned. Thomas was 28 years old when he died that night, and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

W. R. Edwards, Royal Air Force. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

William Glynne Edwards, Lieutenant, Royal Navy. William was the son of William and Mary Lloyd Edwards, of Aberystwyth and was 31 years of age. He served on the destroyer HMS Harvester. In March 1943 whilst she was providing escort duties for convoy HX 228 in the Atlantic she forced U-444 to the surface before ramming her. Shortly after on 11 March 1943 she was herself attacked by U-432 and broke in half with the loss of 9 officers and 136 ratings. William was amongst those lost and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

Edward Symon Ellis, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. Edward was the son of David and Mary Rachel Ellis, and the husband of Dorothy Ellis, of Holywell, Flintshire. He served aboard HMS Bonaventure, a light Anti Aircraft Cruiser. On 31 March 1941 she was on escort duty with convoy GA-008, from Greece to Alexandria when she was torpedoed and sunk approximately 100 miles south southeast of Crete by the Italian submarine Ambra. Edward was 32 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Eric Glynn Evans, Major, 67683, Royal Artillery. Eric was the son of Ivor and Elizabeth Evans, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 146th (The Pembroke Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. Reformed as field artillery during WW2, the Pembroke Yeomanry’s Cardiganshire Battery became a separate Regiment on the outbreak of the Second World War, and as 146th Field Regiment they landed in Suez in September 1942, joining the Eighth Army in time for the battle of El Alamein, forming part of the 7th Armoured Division. Eric was killed during the final stages of the Tunisian Campaign, on 26 April 1943. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

John Rhys Evans, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1330061, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of David John and Mary Ellen Evans, of Highgate, Middlesex. He served with the Royal Air Force, and died on 25 July 1941, aged 19. John is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

Linus Evans, Captain, 217383, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Linus was the son of John and Eleanor Evans, and the husband of Margaret Magdalen Elizabeth Evans, of Aberystwyth. He played football for Aberystwyth FC prior to the war, before becoming commissioned into the 6th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion landed on the Normandy beaches on the end of June 1944, attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division, and took part in the break-out from the Normandy beach-head. It then played an important role in the advance through Northern France into Belgium and Holland. Linus was killed whilst fighting around the Reichswald Forest on 8 February 1945. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Thomas Edward Evans, Leading Aircraftman, 1419519, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of Evan Richard and Emmie Elizabeth Evans, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. Thomas died at Aberystwyth on 6 January 1943, aged 19, and is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

John Roger Eyton-Morgan, Flying Officer (Pilot), 162004, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Thomas and Nellie White Eyton-Morgan, of Fronhyfryd, Aberystwyth. He served as a Pilot with 144 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. The squadron was a Coastal Command unit, equipped with the Bristol Beaufighter. On 26 April 1915, John was flying his Beaufighter during an operation over Feda Fjord, Norway when it crashed, killing John and his Navigator, Flight Sergeant Knox. John was 21 years old, and is buried at Feda Churchyard, Norway, alongside his Navigator.

 

Michael Barry Fowler, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1270304, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Michael was the son of David William and Edith Piper Fowler, of Aberystwyth. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force, and was posted to Canada under the Empire Air Training Scheme. Michael was killed in Canada on 12 March 1943, aged 18, and is buried at Medicine Hat (Hillside) Cemetery, Alberta, Canada. Michael is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Daniel Ernest George, Pilot Officer, 121564, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Daniel, known as Ernest, was born in 1910, the son of Daniel Henry George and of Agnes Lilly George, of 7, Skinner Street, Aberystwyth. He was residing at 5, Salisbury Road, Wrexham at the outbreak of war, with his wife, Joan George, before enlisting into the Royal Air Force, and becoming a Pilot. Daniel then served with 540 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a photo-reconnaissance unit, equipped with the Supermarine Spitfire IV. Daniel was posted as missing presumed killed when he failed to return after an operation on 3 April 1943. He was 32 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Geoffrey Leavitt Govier, Private, 1479550, Army Catering Corps. Geoffrey was the son of Ralph and Blanche Govier, of Wallasey, and the husband of Elsie Lavinia Govier, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Army Catering Corps, and died in London on 10 March 1946, aged 31. Geoffrey is buried at Wallasey (Rake Lane) Cemetery, Lancashire. He is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Thomas David Irfon Griffith, Captain, 176104, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of John Albert and Margaret Ann Griffith, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Mary Flora Griffith, of Llanfihangel Talyllyn, Brecknockshire. He served with the 6th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion was a TA unit, attached to 158th Infantry Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, and landed in Normandy at the end of June 1944. The division then took part in the fighting in the Bocage, and the subsequent break-out from the Normandy beach-head. Between 15 and 17 July 1944 Operation Greenline took place, which was designed to capture the high ground around Bougy, Evrecy, and Maizet, south of the Odon. For this operation the 158th Infantry Brigade came under command of the 15th (Scottish) Division. Thomas was killed during the 6th RWF attack on Evrecy on 17 July 1944. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Bayeux Memorial, France.

 

Gerallt Tegwyn Griffith, Flying Officer, 80889, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gerallt was born in 1896, the son of William Gwyn and Annie Griffith. Prior to the war he lived with his wife, Gwyneth Elizabeth Griffith, at The Bay Hotel, Aberystwyth. He was commissioned as a Flying Officer on 20 October 1923, and served with the Royal Air Force for several years prior to the outbreak of war. On 14 June 1940, Gerallt rejoined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, after being re-commissioned as a Flying Officer. After the invasion of Europe on 6 June 1944, Gerallt joined the invasion forces as part of the RAF Regiment, and took part in the liberation of Holland. On 17 December 1944, he was enjoying a night off, and was watching a film at the Rex Cinema in Antwerp when the building was hit by a German V2 rocket, which killed almost 600 people. Gerallt was 48 years old, and is buried in Schoonselhof Cemetery near Antwerpen, Holland.

 

John Illingworth Hollings, Officer Cadet, 6477407, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). John was the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hollings, of Aberystwyth. He was serving as an Officer Cadet with the Royal Fusiliers when he died on active service on 16 May 1942. John was 21 years old, and is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Gwynne Morgan Hughes, Driver, T/220892, Royal Army Service Corps. Gwynne was the son of David James Hughes and Annie Hughes, of Aberystwyth. He served during the war with the Royal Army Service Corps. Gwynne survived the war, but died on 6 January 1947. He was 35 years old, and is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Hector Morgan Hughes, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Hector was born at Aberystwyth in 1903. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Llanashe, a London registered Cargo Steamer. On 17 February 1943, Llanashe was on route from New York via Busreh and Bendar Abbas for Port Elizabeth, carrying a cargo of 3,500 tons of tin plate and aluminium, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-182 and sunk with the loss of 28 lives. Hector was 39 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated alongside his fellow crew-men on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Oswald James Hughes, Able Seaman, C/JX 241255, Royal Navy. Oswald was the son of Oswald and Edith Hughes, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Navy, and was posted aboard the SS Walnut, a merchant steamer. On 27 October 1941, Walnut left Liverpool for Newry, carrying a cargo of coal. She was never seen again, and was declared as a war loss. Oswald was 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

William James Hughes, Seaman, LT/JX 206369, Royal Naval Patrol Service. William was the son of John William and Catherine Mary Hughes, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Jane Olwen Hughes, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard HM Trawler Bredon. Bredon was a Hill class naval trawler that served as an anti-submarine escort trawler. On 8 February 1943 she was working off the Canary Islands, when she was sunk by the German submarine U-521, with the loss of 41 lives. William was 32 years old when he died, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

Owen Henry Humphreys, Captain, 244160, General List. Owen was known as Harry, and was the son of Owen and Caroline Humphreys, of Aberystwyth. He was commissioned from the Royal Army Service Corps on 26 August 1942, joining the General List of officers. Harry took part in the Normandy invasion, and the ensuing liberation of Belgium and Holland in 1944. He was killed near Brussels on 7 December 1944, aged 33, and is buried in Brussels Town Cemetery, Belgium. Within a month of his death, Harry was Mentioned in Despatches for his services in Northwest Europe.

 

David Dennis James, Telegraphist, D/JX 211773, Royal Navy. David served with the Royal Navy aboard the frigate HMS Mourne. On 15 June 1944, Mourne was in action, supporting the Normandy Landings, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-767 in the English Channel. Three days later, whilst still in the channel, the U-Boat was to suffer a similar fate when she was hunted down by British destroyers with depth charges, and sunk. David is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

John Herbert James, Fusilier, 4204148, Royal Welch Fusiliers. John was the son of Hugh Owen James and Elizabeth James, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 70th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, which was a young soldiers battalion. John died on active service at Sleaford, Lincolnshire on 19 May 1943, aged 26. John was brought home for burial at Penygarn Calvinistic Methodist Cemetery, Tirymynach.

 

John Samuel Jarman, Sergeant, 1617852, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was born at Aberystwyth in 1908, the son of Thomas Edward Jarman and Esther Jarman. At some time between the wars, the family had moved to 7, Cumberland Road, Swindon. During 1939, John joined the Royal Air Force, and worked at the Air Ministry as an Air Service Assistant Clerk. John died at the RAF Hospital at Wroughton, Wiltshire on 24 November 1944. He was 35 years old, and is buried in Swindon (Christ Church) Burial Ground.

 

Harry Jeffrey Jeffcoat, Flying Officer, 79240, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Harry was the son of Harry and Dora Minnie Jeffcoat, of Aberystwyth. He had fought during the Battle of Britain with 236 Squadron, before being posted to 44 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Hampden. Harry was killed when his Hamden, Serial AE196, was lost over the sea while on a mission to Brest Harbour on 13 December 1941. He was 32 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Harry is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Evan James Jenkins, Leading Seaman, LT/5806D, Royal Naval Reserve (Patrol Service). Evan was the son of David and Jane Jenkins of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Anice Nora Jenkins, of Cardiff. He served with the Royal Naval Reserve, and was mobilised at the outbreak of war, joining the Royal Naval Patrol Service. Evan was posted aboard HM Trawler Rubens. Rubens was an anti-submarine trawler, which had been taken over by the Admiralty in August 1940. On 21 February 1941, Rubens was operating about 230 miles south-west of Ireland when she was attacked and sunk by a German Focke-Wulf 200. Evan was 36 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

G. Jenkins, Royal Artillery. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

Leslie Howard Jenkins, Sergeant, 577165, Royal Air Force. Leslie was born at Aberystwyth in 1922, the son of George and Bessie Jenkins. He volunteered to serve with the Royal Air Force, and served as a Flight Engineer with 90 Squadron. The squadron had reformed in early May 1941, and became part of No. 2 Group RAF, becoming equipped with the Boeing Flying Fortress Mk.1. Early experience with this aircraft proved to be unsuccessful, and the squadron re-equipped with the Bristol Blenheim. In November 1942 the Squadron reformed as part of No. 3 (Bomber) Group, equipped with Short Stirling Mk.I, and began mining sorties in January 1943. Leslie was killed when his Stirling was lost on one such operation on 4 February 1943. He was 20 years old, and is buried in Montfoort General Cemetery, Utrecht, Netherlands.

 

David Lloyd Jones, Flight Sergeant, 975131, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the husband of Gwendoline Eva Jones, and the son of John William and Elizabeth Ann Jones, of Aberystwyth. He worked in the National Library of Wales prior to the war. David enlisted into the Royal Air Force, and became a Navigator with 115 Squadron. From the spring of 1943 onwards the squadron flew the Avro Lancaster. David died at Ely, Cambridgeshire on 19 April 1944, aged 30, possibly dying after returning from a mission. He was brought home for burial in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

David Thomas Jones, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1120283, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of William and Elizabeth Jones, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Molly Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. David died on active service at Swansea on 12 April 1943, aged 35, and was brought home for burial at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Edgar John Jones, Private, D/37528, South Wales Borderers. Edgar was the son of Edwin and Sofia Jones of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Florence May Jones, of Bedwellty. He served with the 5th (H.D.) Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion formed in 1939 for Home Defence duties. Edgar died on active service on 13 November 1941, aged 48. He is buried in Bedwellty (St. Sannan) Churchyard.

 

Emrys Davies Jones, Captain, 177657, Parachute Regiment. Emrys was the son of Thomas Edwin Samuel and Mary Gwladys Jones, and the husband of Margaretta Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 6th Battalion, Parachute Regiment, Army Air Corps, which had been formed from the 10th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion's first action was during Operation Slapstick, at the port of Taranto, Italy. Emrys was killed when the battalion captured Mottola on 10 September 1943. He was 28 years old and is commemorated on the Cassino Memorial, Italy. Emrys is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Evan Morgan Jones, Seaman, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of John James Jones, Coal Merchant, of 6, Queen Street, Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy, and was home on leave when he accidentally drowned at Aberystwyth on 5 July 1942, aged 31. He is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

 

George Rowland Jones, Sergeant, 3909865, South Wales Borderers. George was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served in the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was the only Welsh unit to land on D-Day, landing at Le Hamel, near Arromanches on the Normandy coast at midday on 6 June 1944. In September the battalion was part of the force that was ordered to seize the port of Le Havre. Its task was particularly challenging, consisting of capturing three woods on a ridge heavily defended by the Germans with trenches, mines, concrete dug outs and wire. After two days of bitter fighting the Borderers had successfully achieved their objective and Le Havre was in Allied hands. Sadly George was killed here on 11 September 1944, aged 26. He is buried in Ste Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France.

 

Gwilym Louis Gobert Jones, Second Officer, Merchant Navy. Gwilym, who was known as Louis, was born on 6 May 1916, the son of Lieutenant Gwilym Jones and of Margaret Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Tymeric, a Glasgow registered steamer. On the morning of 23 November 1940, Tymeric was in convoy OB-244, carrying a cargo of coal from Hull to Buenos Aires, when she was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-123, and sank in flames with the loss of 71 lives. Louis was 24 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Harold Frederick Jones, Flying Officer, 54704, Royal Air Force. Harold was the son of Amy Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served as an Air Gunner with 622 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster Mark III. On 6 November 1944, Harold took off in a Lancaster which formed part of a force of 738 aircraft which attacked the Nordstern synthetic-oil plant. Harold's Lancaster was lost during the raid. Harold is buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery, Germany. Harold is commemorated on his parents grave at Aberystwyth Cemetery.

John James Jones, Royal Air Force. John cannot presently be identified, but he was reported as missing during February 1945.

 

Louis Fleming Jones, M.A., Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Louis was the son of Edward and Elizabeth Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Navy aboard H.M. Submarine Simoom. Simoom went on patrol from Port Said to the Aegean on 2 November 1943. Three days later she was diverted to the entrance of the Dardanelles Straits. She was supposed to have the returned to port, but was never seen again. The Admiralty declared her as having officially been lost on 19 November 1943. The cause of her loss has never been verified. Louis was 24 years old when he died, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

Richard Trefor Jones, Gunner, 1832882, Royal Artillery. Richard was born on 18 December 1902, the son of Richard and Elizabeth Jane Jones. His father was killed at Mametz Wood on 10 July 1916. Richard married Florence Ena Humphreys on 16 October 1937 and the couple lived in 6, Fourth Avenue, Caeffynon, Aberystwyth. He served with 145 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, but took ill and was discharged from the army on 21 June 1944. Richard died at Aberystwyth Hospital of heart disease on 13 June 1945. He was 42 years old, and is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Robert Norman Jones, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 553482, Royal Air Force. Robert was the son of Gwladys Jones, of Wombourne, and the foster-son of Hannah J. Jones, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. Robert died on active service on 10 December 1941, aged 18 and is buried at Wombourne (St. Benedict) Churchyard, Staffordshire. Robert is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Stanley Jones, Driver, 14429117, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Stanley was the son of Owen and Florence Jones, of Aberystwyth. Stanley was accidentally killed on 3 December 1943, aged 18. He is buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Ivor Martin Kendall, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1470879, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Ivor was the son of Ivor J. Kendall and Sarah Kendall, of Ponterwyd. He served with the Royal Air Force at the Apprentices Training Unit at RAF Halton. Ivor died on actice service at Aylesbury on 10 January 1942. He was 19 years old, and was brought home for burial at Yspytty Cynfyn (St. John The Baptist) Churchyard.

 

David Richard Doughton Lewis, Seaman, LT/JX 205200, Royal Naval Patrol Service. David was the son of Edward Thomas Lewis and Elizabeth Sarah Ann Lewis, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Frances Rowlands Lewis, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard the mine sweeper HM Trawler Orfasy. During the night of 21 October 1943 Orfasy, whilst escorting the Danish tanker Litiopa, was heard to have fired two depth charges at the German U-Boat U-68, but was immediately hit by a torpedo which she had fired, and exploded, sinking with al hands, about 185 miles southeast of Freetown off the African coast. David was 31 years of age when he died on 22 October 1943, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

Dennys Markham Lewis, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Dennys was the son of Edward Thomas and Elizabeth Sarah Anne Lewis of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy, aboard SS Empire Heron, a London registered cargo steamer. On 15 October 1941, Empire Heron was in convoy SC-48, which was crossing the Atlantic on route to Manchester with a cargo of sulphur. Waiting in mid Atlantic was a German U boat pack, which attacked the convoy. Empire Heron was struck on the starboard side by two torpedoes fired by U-568, causing her to sink with the loss of 42 of her 43 crew. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

George Daniel Lewis, Sailor, Merchant Navy. Dan was the son of William and Margaret Lewis, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS George H Jones, a London Registered steamer. She had joined convoy SL-111 at Freetown and was carrying a cargo of fuel oil bound for the Isle of Arran. Sometime after leaving Freetown she was ordered to make for the Azores after developing engine trouble which forced her to drop out of the Convoy. On the morning of 11 June 1942, SS George H Jones was intercepted by the German submarine U-455 off the Azores, which torpedoed and sunk her. Nineteen crew and the captain were picked up and landed back in Freetown. A further 20 survivors were picked up and landed at Londonderry. Dan and a DEMS gunner were lost in the sinking. Dan was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Trevor Evans and Jack Sweeney of Llanon were ship mates of Dan’s, and both managed to get into a lifeboat. Despite a lack of food, water and shelter the pair were fortunately rescued two days later.

 

John Norman Madeley, Private, 5833836, Cambridgeshire Regiment. John was born at Aberystwyth in 1914, the son of Thomas and Mary Ann Madeley. His father was from Market Drayton, but had worked in the town for several years prior to the First World War. John served with the 2nd Battalion, Cambridgeshire Regiment. The battalion had spent the early years of the war on home service, before sailing for the Far East on 31 August 1941. On 13 January 1942 the convoy carrying the battalion, and other units, reached Singapore, and the troops disembarked. The battalion was immediately thrown into heavy fighting during the Japanese assault on Singapore, which was surrendered to the Japanese on 15 February 1942. John was taken into captivity and put to work on the Thai-Burma Railway. John died as a PoW on 12 January 1943, aged 28. He is buried in Chungkai War Cemetery, Thailand. John is not commemorated at Aberystwyth. His parents later moved to North Watford, Watford, Hertfordshire.

David Mann, Engineman, LT/KX 125167, Royal Naval Patrol Service. David was born at Pwllheli in 1921, the son of Richard Mann and Catherine Mann (nee Roberts), of Pwllheli. He married Florence Parry, of Aberystwyth in 1942. David served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Birdlip, an anti-submarine trawler. On 13 June 1944, Birdlip was on patrol off Greenville, Liberia, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-547. David was 23 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.          

 

John Powell Middlehurst, MID, Flying Officer, 41605, Royal Air Force. John was the son of Richard Foster Middlehurst and Dorothy Elizabeth Middlehurst, of Aberystwyth, and the husband of Joan Middlehurst. He served in 113 Squadron, Royal Air Force, during which time he was mentioned in despatches. In the summer of 1941 the squadron was based in north Africa and were equipped with the Bristol Blenheim. Duties ranged from strafing enemy convoys, bombing airfields and enemy harbours. John was killed when his aircraft was lost on a mission on 2 July 1941, aged 21. He is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

Kathleen Miller, Third Officer, Women's Royal Naval Service. Kathleen was born on 5 May 1907, the daughter of Henry and Jane Anne Miller, of Sunny Side, Llanbadarn Fawr. The CWGC show that she later resided at Englefield Green, Surrey, but this cannot be confirmed. Kathleen served with the Women's Royal Naval Service, and was posted to HMS Cormorant, a receiving ship, which was moored at Gibraltar. Kathleen died at sea aboard the S.S. Aquila on 19 August 1941, when the ship was torpedoed by the German submarine U-201 in the Bay of Biscay. She was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Ronald Henry Morgan, Leading Aircraftsman, 1381382, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Ronald was the son of Henry George and Mabel Morgan, of Birmingham. He served with the Royal Air Force. On 16 May 1941, Ronald was flying aboard a Tiger Moth, Serial T5712 of 9 EFTS, when it hit a balloon cable and crashed at Walsgrave. Both Ronald and his pilot were killed. Ronald was 28 years old, and was buried with full military honours in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Albert Ronald Oxenham, Pilot Officer, 176286, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Albert was born in Dalston, London on 8 September 1917, the son of Henry John and Sarah Jane Oxenham. He worked as a Policeman for Essex Constabulary prior to the war and married Phyllis Joan Davies, of Aberystwyth in 1943. Albert joined the Royal Air Force, and qualified as a Pilot before being posted to 100 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. On the night of 21 May 1944 Albert took off from RAF Grimsby bound for Duisberg, flying Lancaster I, Serial ME-677. The aircraft was brought down the following morning, early on 22 May 1944, killing Albert and five other crewmen. Albert was 27 years old, and is buried alongside his crewmates at Schoonselhof Cemetery, Belgium. Albert is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

John Albert Parker, Gunner, 14250467, Royal Artillery. John was the son of John Holbrooke Parker and Florence Gertrude Parker, of Grays, Essex. Little is known of Albert, but he died at Aberystwyth on 14 December 1942, aged 18, and is buried at Aberystwyth Cemetery. John is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

John Daniel Parry, Stoker, LT/KX 125170, Royal Naval Patrol Service. John was the husband of Rhoda Lilian Parry, of Gorleston, Norfolk. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard HMS Southern Flower, an anti submarine trawler. On 3 March 1945, Southern Flower was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-1022 off Reykjavik, Iceland. John was 23 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

William John Phippen, Sergeant, 913952, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Ernest George and Dorothy L. A. Phippen, of Hutton, Somerset. He served with 57 Squadron, Royal Air Force, and had married Margaret Myrtle Jones, of Aberystwyth, in 1942. The Squadron was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Vickers Wellington, and took part in the strategic night bombing offensive. William was killed when his Wellington went missing on 30 June 1942. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. William is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Gareth Pryse-Howell, Sergeant, 1282866, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gareth was the son of John P. Howell and Phyllis P. Howell, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force. Gareth was killed on 12 October 1942, probably whilst part of the crew of a Bristol Beaufort. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

John Catton Rea, Second Lieutenant, 135975, Royal Engineers. John was the son of John Charles and Florence Isabel Rea, of Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. John was serving with the Royal Engineers, and was based near Chelmsford when he was killed on 27 July 1940, aged 31. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey. John is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Gwilym David Rees, Private, 14415287, Welch Regiment. Gwilym served with the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was the Carmarthenshire TA battalion, and was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. At the end of June 1944 the division landed in Normandy, taking part in the terrible fighting in the Bocage. It then took part in the epic drive through Northern France into Belgium and through Holland. Gwilym was killed during the fight to capture s'Hertogenbosch on 23 October 1944. He was 19 years old, and is buried in Uden War Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

Henry Albert Richards, Warrant Officer Class II (B.S.M.), 1489341, Royal Artillery. Henry was the son of Henry Albert and Elizabeth Louisa Richards, and the husband of Ethel Richards, of Aberystwyth. He served with 144 Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was based in Fifeshire. Henry died on active service on 9 February 1945, aged 46, and is buried at Dunfermline Cemetery, Scotland. Henry is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Eric Charles Roberts, Gunner, 907348, Royal Artillery. Eric was the son of John T. and Jennie Roberts of Aberystwyth, Cardiganshire. He served with 146 (Pembroke Yeomanry) Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery. Reformed as field artillery, the Pembroke Yeomanry’s Cardiganshire Battery became a separate Regiment on the outbreak of the Second World War, and was numbered the 146th Field Regiment. They landed in Suez in September 1942, joining the Eighth Army in time for the battle of El Alamein, then forming part of the 7th Armoured Division Artillery until the ‘Desert Rats’ left Italy in 1944. Converted to medium artillery in England, the Regiment disembarked in France in July 1944, taking part in the drive through Northern France into Belgium and Holland. Eric was killed in action on 2 Nov 1944, aged 25, and is buried in Venray War Cemetery, Netherlands.

Gerald Brinley Roberts, Sergeant, 651715, Royal Air Force. Gerald was the son of William Evan and Ercilla Roberts. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 77 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The squadron was employed on reconnaissance and Security Patrols during the early months of the war. Gerald was killed when his aircraft was shot down over Germany on 28 June 1941. He was 24 years old, and is buried in Hamburg Cemetery, Germany.

 

Thomas Glyn Roberts, Gunner, 1717208, Royal Artillery. Thomas was the son of William and Priscilla Roberts, and the husband of E. M. Roberts, of Aberystwyth. He served with 239 Battery, 77 Heavy Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was a TA unit, raised in South Wales. On 6 December 1941, the regiment sailed in Convoy WS14 from the Clyde bound for the Middle East. By the time the Convoy had reached Durban, the destination of the Regiments had been changed to Singapore, and again to Djakarta, in Java, and the Convoy reached its destination on 4 February 1942. 239 Battery moved by road and rail to Surabaja, in Eastern Java and went into action in that area in February 1942. Thomas was captured by the Japanese in Java when it capitulated in March 1942. He survived over two years in captivity, but died as a POW on 8 November 1944, aged 33. Thomas is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore.

William Glyndwr Roberts, Gunner, 1133737, Royal Artillery. William served with 4 Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment had served in the North African campaign. In July 1943, with the Axis forces in North Africa defeated, 4th Regiment returned to England to train for the invasion of Europe. William was killed during the fighting to break out of the Normandy beach-head on 17 July 1944. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Tilly-Sur-Seulles War Cemetery, Calvados, France.

 

Evan John Stephens, Sergeant, 967065, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John served with the 335th Fighter Group, Royal Air Force, which was based at RAF Steeple Morden, in Cambridgeshire. Evan was reported as missing, believed killed on active service on 24 August 1940. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Bryan Robert Thomas, Sergeant, 1051799, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Bryan was the son of Edward Campbell Thomas, of Briarley, Iorwerth Avenue, Aberystwyth. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 142 Squadron, Royal Air Force. In 1941 the squadron was flying the Vickers Wellington, on strategic night bombing missions. Bryan was killed in action when his Wellington was brought down over northern Europe on 21 October 1941. He was 29 years old, and is buried in Sage War Cemetery, Germany. The cemetery in made up of many airmen, most of whom were lost in bombing raids over northern Europe, who were brought in from other cemeteries after the war were for reburial.

Harold Thomas, Chief Officer, Merchant Marine. Harold was the son of Captain Thomas and Sarah Ann Thomas, of Aberystwyth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Ocean Crusader, a British registered Liberty ship. On 26 November 1942, she was on her maiden voyage from Portland, Maine, to Avonmouth, UK, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-262, northeast of St John’s, Newfoundland. Due to heavy weather she was a straggler from the main convoy, HX-216, and went down with all hands on 26 November 1942. Harold was 43 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David Thomas Aaron Tinnuche, Private, 7608236, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. David was the son of Gwilym and Sarah Tinnuche, of Llanelli. He married Sarah Jane Ruthetta Charman, of Aberystwyth, in 1940. David served with 14 Army Ordnance Depot, Royal Army Ordnance Corps, which landed at Sword Beach on D-Day, 6 June 1944. David was killed months later, on 26 September 1944. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, France. David is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

Edward Hammond Whitehouse, Flight Lieutenant, 42035, Royal Air Force. Edward was the son of Wallace Edward and Mabel Whitehouse, of Aberystwyth. He served as a Pilot with 264 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was reformed on 8 December 1939 at Martlesham Heath, to bring the Boulton Paul Defiant fighter into service. Operations began in March 1940 when the squadron started convoy patrols. After initial successes the Luftwaffe soon realised that the Defiant was vulnerable to frontal attack, and the squadron started to have heavy losses of aircraft and crew. Edward was killed when his Defiant Mark I, Serial L6959 was shot down by a Messerschmitt Me109 on 28 May 1940. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Douglas Eric Whitfield, Corporal, 7891029, Royal Armoured Corps. Douglas was the son of Harry Oswald Whitfield, and of Marie Whitfield, of Aberystwyth. He served with the 5th Royal Tank Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps. As part of 1st Armoured Division, 5th Royal Tank Regiment went to France in 1940, and after losing most its tanks during the retreat to Dunkirk, rebuilt before moving to North Africa. Douglas was killed on the Second Battle of El Alamein, on 24 November 1941. He was 22 years old and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt. Douglas is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Kenneth Jarratt Wilkinson, Bombardier, 927666, Royal Artillery. Kenneth was the son of Charles Richard and Florence May Wilkinson, of Aberystwyth. He served with 146 (The Pembroke Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. The 146th Field Regiment was raised in Cardiganshire, and joined the Eighth Army in time to take part in the Battle of El Alamein. Afterwards it became part of the 7th Armoured Division, taking part in the advance to Tripoli, and helping defeat Rommel's counter-attack at Medenine. The Regiment fought with the Desert Rats until the fall of Tunis in May 1943. Kenneth was killed here on 8 May 1943. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Massicault War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

D. Edwin Williams, Merchant Navy. This man cannot presently be identified.

David John Williams, OBE, Master, Merchant Navy. David was the son of David Williams, and of Annie Williams, of Aberystwyth. He was a long serving Mariner, and had been awarded the Lloyd's Medal for lifesaving at sea, and also created an Officer of the British Empire. David served as Master of the SS Empire Tower, a London registered cargo steamer. On 5 March 1943, she was on route from Huelva and Gibraltar for Middlesbrough when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-130, and sunk with the loss of 38 lives. David was 38 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated alongside his crew on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Matilda Ann Wraight, Civilian. Matilda was the daughter Charles and Emily Knott, of Aberystwyth. She lived with her husband Walter Wraight at Coburg Buildings, Westminster, London. Matilda was severely injured during the Blitz on 16 November 1940, and died that same day at Westminster Hospital, aged 52. She is buried at Westminster. Matilda is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

Ernest Alfred Wright, Warrant Officer Class II, 5102277, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Ernest was the Husband of Gwyneth May Wright, of Aberystwyth. Ernest served as Company Sergeant Major with the 1/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The battalion had been in France in 1940, and was evacuated from Dunkirk. It landed at Sword Beach on 29 June 1944, and took part in the fighting around Caen. Ernest was killed here on 8 July 1944, aged 39, and is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, France. Ernest is not named on the Aberystwyth Memorial.

 

George Henry Wynne, Sergeant, 847519, Royal Air Force (Auxiliary Air Force). George was the son of Edward Price Wynne and Emma Gertrude Wynne, of Trefechan, Aberystwyth. He served with the Royal Air Force as a Navigator. George was one of three men who died in an aircraft accident whilst training at RAF Lossiemouth on 4 August 1942. He was 30 years old, and is buried in Lossiemouth Burial Ground, Scotland.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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