West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Cardigan WW1 War Memorial

Cardigan lies on the estuary of the River Teifi at the point where Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire meet. The site was chosen as a strategically important point for the building of its Norman Castle, by Robert Montgomery in 1093. It was the county town of the pre-1974 county of Cardiganshire, and is the second largest town in Ceredigion. In 1199 the town received its first charter and was an important trade centre, with the river becoming an important port, where goods were imported and exported all over the world, until the river silted up. During both World Wars, Cardigan contributed a large number of men and women to the forces, and many of these were to sadly lose their lives. The fallen are commemorated on the Cardigan Cenotaph, which is located at Victoria Gardens on North Road. There is a fine marble memorial in St. Mary's Church at Cardigan (inset) which replicates the same names of those who fell during the Great War.

 

The Great War, 1914-1918

David Meredith Phillips Bevan, Private, 305689, London Regiment. David was born at Portsmouth in 1895, the son of Benjamin and Sarah Bevan. His father was a Customs Officer, from Burry Port, and by 1911 had moved the family to Cardigan, where they lived at 1, Quay Street. David was educated at King's College, London. He was still a student there when war broke out, and he enlisted into the Essex Regiment. He was posted to Egypt, joining the 1/10th Battalion, London Regiment, which was attached to 162 Brigade, 54th (East Anglian) Division. He took part in the Palestinian campaign from 1917 until the end of the war, and returning to civilian life became a Bank Clerk for the National and Provincial Bank, living at 10, Pembrey Road, Llanelli. He died from the effects of the war at Netley, Priory Street, Cardigan on 14 September 1921, aged 25 and was buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

David Benjamin  Blake, Private, 33779, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of William and Jane Blake, of Greenfield Row, Cardigan. David enlisted at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost, and fought at the Battle of Pozières. On 3 August the division began moving to entrain for Bailleul, prior to moving into positions at Rossignol Wood. David was killed in action during a routine spell in the trenches here on 28 August 1916, aged 32. He is buried at Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, Belgium. His cousin Richard also fell.

Richard Blake, Private, 48872, South Wales Borderers. Richard was the son of Benjamin and Mary Blake, of 12, North Road, Cardigan. Richard enlisted at Brecon in 1917 into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to France, joining the 6th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was the Pioneer Battalion to the 25th Division. He probably joined the battalion after it had taken part in the Battle of Messines Ridge. After fighting at Messines, the Division moved north, and fought at Pilckem, before moving south again, where it took up positions around Bullecourt in reserve. Here the Division was used to reinforce the badly depleted British units that were hit in the area by the German Spring Offensive. It moved north to Flanders on the night of 30 March, and took up positions at Ploegsteert again, where it received reinforcements, and rebuilt. However, on 9 April the Germans launched an offensive on the Lys, and the Division was caught up in the terrible fighting here. Richard was killed in action here on 10 April 1918. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium. His cousin David also fell.

George Bowen, Corporal, 18324, Welsh Regiment. George was the son of Evan and Hannah Bowen, of Cardigan. He enlisted at cardigan on 14 October 1914 into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The Division suffered terrible casualties that day, and remained in the Festubert area to rebuild over the coming winter. George was killed in action here on 4 December 1915, when he was spotted by a German sniper who shot him in the head. He was 28 years old, and is buried at St. Vaast Post Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L'Avoue, France.

John Brown, Gunner, 85323, Machine Gun Corps. John was the son of Mrs. MacCunn, of Sandbank, Ardnadam, Argyle. He worked at Cardiff as a Draper and had served with the Volunteers prior to the war. He married Sydney Kate Williams in Cardiff on 20 September 1914, and the couple had two children. John enlisted at Cardiff on 9 December 1915 into the Argylle and Sutherland Highlanders. On 8 February 1917 he was transferred from the Paisley Depot to the Machine Gun Corps, and was posted to the Middle East, landing in Basra on 9 November and joining the 60th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, which was attached to the 60th (2/2nd London) Division. The campaign in Mesopotamia was on the wane by now, as the Turks were in full retreat. John was kicked by a horse in February 1918 and sustained two broken ribs. He returned to duty after recovering, and was killed in action on 19 September 1918 aged 36. He is buried in Ramleh War Cemetery, Israel. His widow Sydney Kate Brown, later moved to 5, High Street, Cardigan. John is commemorated on the memorial at St. Mary's Church, but not on the main cenotaph.

Ronald Frederick William Carroll, Sailor, Mercantile Marine. Ronald was born at Cardigan in 1899, the son of John Frederick and Elizabeth Carroll (Nee Bartlett), of Brondeg, Grangetown, Cardigan. He served with the Mercantile Marine, aboard the SS Treveal, a St. Ives registered Armed Merchant steamer. On 4 February 1918, Treveal was on route from Algiers for Barrow she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-53 and sunk, off the Skerries, Anglesey. Ronald was amongst 33 men who died aboard her that day. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Albert Thomas Charles, Private, 2197, Welsh Regiment. Albert was the son of David Charles and Mary Anne Charles, of 1, Lion Terrace, Cardigan. He worked as a School Teacher prior to the war, and enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Albert was wounded soon after landing, and was evacuated by Hospital Ship to Malta. He died of his wounds there on 21 August 1915, aged 20, and is buried at Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta.

Norman Nicholas Daniel, Private, 2217, Welsh Regiment. Norman was the son of Henry Rowland and Martha Daniel, of St. Mary's Street, Cardigan. He was a bank clerk prior to the war, and also a pre-war member of the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He was mobilised in August 1914, joining the battalion at Pembroke Dock. Norman was accidentally killed by a bullet fired by a sentry, whilst asleep in his tent at Scoveston Camp, Pembroke on 18 October 1914, aged 21. He is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

 

Benjamin Davies, Apprentice, Mercantile Marine. Benjamin was the son of David and Catherine Davies (nee Edwards), of the Eagle, Castle Street, Cardigan. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the S.S. Treveal, a St. Ives registered cargo steamer. On 4 February 1918 Treveal was on route from Algiers for Barrow when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-53 and sank off the Skerries, Anglesey with the loss of 33 lives. Benjamin was 19 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

David Evan Davies, Private, 56738, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of David and Margaret Davies, of Tywyn, Bridell, Cardigan. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Elizabeth Blodwen Davies (nee Griffiths), at Trebared Farm, Cardigan. David enlisted at Cardiff into the Welsh Regiment on 6 October 1914, and was posted to France on 29 July 1916, where he joined the 14th Battalion (Swansea), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. David joined the battalion as a reinforcement after the attack on Mametz Wood in July 1916. The division suffered terrible losses at Mametz and in August 1916 moved to positions north of Ypres, at Boesinghe, to rebuild. He was killed in action at Boesinghe soon after, on 13 September 1916. David was 28 years old, and is buried at Essex Farm Cemetery, Belgium.

David Gwyn Davies, Private, 29739, South Wales Borderers. David was born in 1895, the son of William and Eleanor Davies, of Hyfrydle, Gwbert Road, Cardigan. He enlisted at Brecon into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to France at sometime in 1916, where he joined the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. David would have seen his first action during the Battle of the Somme in the summer of 1916. The Division followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line in early 1917, and was then briefed for an operation on the Flanders Coast, moving there during the summer of 1917. While training on the coast, the Battle of Third Ypres had stalled in the mire, and the Division were recalled to Ypres, where they fought at the Second Battle of Passchendaele. David was killed in action here on 10 November 1917, He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Gwilym Davies, Private, 35880, Welsh Regiment. Gwilym was the son of James and Ellen Davies, of 7, Feidrfair, Cardigan. He worked as a chauffeur at Newport, Monmouth prior to the war and enlisted there into the Welsh Regiment. He was posted to Salonika, joining the 11th Battalion (Cardiff), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. Gwilym was taken ill with dysentery, and died in Salonika on 11 July 1916. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Mikra British Cemetery, Kalamaria, Salonika.

John Daniel Davies, Second Engineer, Mercantile Marine. John was born at Grangetown, Cardigan, the son of Daniel Davies. In August 1917 he married Mary Sarah Morris, and she set up the family home at Capel Llangeitho, Trefaron, Cardigan. John served in the Mercantile Marine as engineer aboard the SS Santa Amalia, a London registered cargo ship. On 28 December 1917, when 30 miles from Malin Head, Ireland she was torpedoed without warning and sunk by the German submarine U-19. John was among 43 men whose lives were lost that day. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Thomas George Davies, Second Mate, Mercantile Marine. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Jane Davies (nee Jones), of 9, Great Western Crescent, Llanelli. Born at St. Dogmael's. He served with the Mercantile Marine, as Second Mate aboard the SS Dowlais, a Cardiff registered cargo ship. On 3 December 1917, Dowlais was torpedoed by German submarine UB-48, and sank off Cape de Fer, Algeria, while on route from Greece for Bona and the Clyde carrying a cargo of copper ore. Thomas was killed in the sinking. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

William Davies, Sergeant, SE/17879, Royal Army Veterinary Corps. William was born at Cardigan in 1872. He married Elizabeth Dowling in Ireland in 1898, and by 1911 the couple resided at Bridgend, where William worked as a Groom. William enlisted at Woolwich into the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, and was posted to the 3rd Veterinary Hospital, Royal Army Veterinary Corps, which was at Salonika. On 1 January 1917, William was aboard HT Ivernia, a transport ship, carrying reinforcements for Egypt, when she was torpedoed and sunk, 93 kilometres from Cape Matapan. William drowned in the sinking of the ship that day, and is commemorated on the Mikra Memorial, Salonika.

 

William Biddyr Davies, Lance Bombardier, 148275, Royal Garrison Artillery. William was the son of Thomas and Ellen Davies, of Stanley House, Pendre, Cardigan. He had originally enlisted at Cardiff into the 20th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 27 November 1915, and on 20 December 1916 transferred to the Royal Garrison Artillery. He embarked for France on 30 April 1917, joining No. 6 Fire Command, but after only two months in France took ill and was invalided home. On 5 October 1918 William was discharged from the army after having been deemed unfit for military service, and he died of a heart condition on 18 December 1918, aged 21. He was buried in Pontypridd (Glyntaff) Cemetery. William does not appear to be commemorated locally.

 

William Lewis Davies, Second Engineer, Mercantile Marine. William was born at St. Mary's, Cardigan, the son of James and Maud Davies (nee Evans). The family later moved to Blaenwaun Farm, Mount, Cardigan. William trained as an engineer, and served aboard the Liverpool registered tanker, S.S. Beacon Light. On 19 February 1918 she was fifteen miles off Scotland, en route from Liverpool with a cargo of fuel oil when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-91, with the loss of 33 lives. William was 25 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

David Drury, Private, 14564, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. David was the son of William and Alice Drury, of Leech Meadows, Sheinton, Cressage, Salop. He resided with his uncle at Star Shop, Cardigan prior to the war, and enlisted at Carmarthen into the army. David was posted to the 1st Battalion, King's Shropshire Light Infantry, which was attached to 16 Brigade, 6th Division. The Division had been in France since 10 September 1914, and had fought at Hooge. David joined the battalion in France on 28 September 1915, and fought on the Somme the following year. The following year, 1917, saw them at Arras, where they fought at the Battle of Hill 70, and then during the Battle of Cambrai later in the year. In the spring of 1918 the Division was one of those hit by the German Offensive on the Somme, which had been launched on 21 March, and the Division took part in the Battle of St Quentin. They were moved from the line, and went to Flanders to rest, but the following month the Germans launched another offensive on the Lys, and the Division saw heavy fighting in the following days. During August 1918 the Allies had recovered sufficiently to be able to launch their own attacks on the Germans, and after a brilliant victory at Villers Brettoneux on 8 August, attacks were launched at Albert. The 6th Division took part in the Advance in Flanders, before moving south, where they took part in the advance on the Hindenburg Line. David was killed in action here on 18 September 1918. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Savy British Cemetery, France.

Thomas Edwards, Private, 9448, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was born at Parcllyn, Aberporth in 1885, the son of John and Frances Edwards. He was an army reservist, and rejoined the colours at Cardiff at the outbreak of war. Thomas landed in France on 1 September 1914 with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas fought with the battalion at the First Battle of Ypres, where the German drive to the Channel coast was stopped, but he was wounded and returned home for treatment. He married Mary Ellen Rees at Merthyr Tydfil on 22 March 1915, prior to returning to France. On 4 April 1915 he was transferred to the 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which had suffered heavy casualties at Neuve Chapelle, whilst attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division. During May they fought at the Battle of Aubers Ridge, and at Festubert. Thomas was killed at Festubert on 24 July 1915, aged 30. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg L'Avoue, France.

David Evans, Private, 14673, South Wales Borderers. David was born in Cardigan, and worked as a miner prior to the war, living with his wife Hannah at 39, Under Marian Street, Clydach Vale, Rhondda. He enlisted at Tonypandy into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to France on 10 December 1914, joining the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was in Flanders attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. After three months in France David was admitted to No. 4 General Hospital at Versailles. He returned to duty some time afterwards, and would have fought in the Battle of Loos in September 1915. He was probably wounded during the Battle of the Somme in 1916, and returned home, dying of his wounds on 25 September 1916, aged 32. He is buried in Rhondda (Trealaw) Cemetery. David is not commemorated locally.

 

David George Evans, Private, 22840, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. David was the son of Mrs. Ann Evans, of 3, Gloster Row, Cardigan. He enlisted at Pantyblaidd into the army, and was posted to France at sometime in 1916, where he joined the 6th Battalion, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. The battalion was attached to 60 Brigade, 20th (Light) Division, and David saw his first major action with the Division during the Battle of the Somme. and took part in the advance to the Hindenburg Line in March, 1917. Later that year they fought at Third Ypres, at the Battles of Langemarck, the Menin Road, and Polygon Wood, before moving south in November, to take part in the Battle of Cambrai. They remained in the area between Cambrai and St. Quentin over the winter of 1917/18 and were attacked there by the German Spring Offensive of 21 March, 1918. They then fought in the retreat at the Battle of the Somme Crossings and the Battle of Rosieres. The Division was withdrawn after the heavy fighting of the Somme battles, moving on 20 April 1918 to an area south west of Amiens, where it rebuilt before taking part in the advance to victory from October 1918. David was killed in action soon after, being struck by a shell on 5 October 1918. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Lievin Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

 

David William Evans, Private, 48054, Northumberland Fusiliers. David was born at Cardigan in 1892, the son of John and Mary Evans, of 23, St. Mary Street. He resided at Newport prior to the war, and when war broke out, he enlisted there into the army. He was posted to the 21st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers (Tyneside Scottish), who were attached to 102 Brigade, 34th Division. The Division moved to France during January 1916 and saw their first action at the opening of the Battle of the Somme, and fought through until the end of 1916 on the Somme before moving north to Arras. David took ill, and died soon after the move to Arras, on 1 March 1917, aged 25, and is buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

James Evans, Driver, 168351, Royal Field Artillery. James was the brother of Margaret Anne James, of 18, Ebens Lane, Cardigan. He served on the Western front with D Battery, 11th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. James survived the war, but succumbed to pneumonia on 28 November 1918, aged 24. He is buried in Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France.

 

James Samuel Evans, Private, S/4980, Black Watch. James was born at Cardigan in 1883, the son of Daniel and Jane Evans. He had lived with his brother, John Phillip Evans, at Argoed, Glanyrafon Road, Pencoed, Bridgend, prior to the war, and enlisted at Tonypandy into the army. James was posted to the 9th Battalion (Royal Highlanders), Black Watch, which was attached to 46 Brigade, 15th (Scottish) Division. James landed in France with his battalion on 7 July 1915, and the Division formed in the Loos area, where it was soon to gain a reputation as one of the most formidable in the British Army. Here they fought at the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. James was killed in action that day, during a suicidal assault on the Hohenzollern Redoubt. He was 32 years old, and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France. James is not commemorated in Cardigan, but at Cilgerran.

John Evans, Private, 19418, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of John and Mary Evans, of Penybank Farm, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the Welsh Regiment, and landed in France on 28 July 1915, where he was posted to the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion had been in France since the outbreak of war, attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. John saw his first major action during the Battle of Loos, and the action at the Hohenzollern redoubt, where John suffered gunshot wounds to the chest. He had recovered and rejoined the battalion in time to fight at the Battle of the Somme. They followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line in early 1917, and were then briefed for an operation on the Flanders Coast, and moved there during the summer of 1917. While training on the coast, the Battle of Third Ypres had stalled in the mire, and the Division were recalled to Ypres, where they fought at the Second Battle of Passchendaele.  After spending another Winter in Flanders, they were near Estaires when the German Spring Offensive caught them, and saw heavy casualties in the following days. John survived this terrible period of the war, but was badly wounded in June. He died of his wounds on 21 June 1918, aged 23, and is buried at Pernes British Cemetery, France.

Lawrence Picton Evans, Lieutenant, Royal Fusiliers. Lawrence was born at Cardigan on 21 November 1875, the son of William Picton Evans and Margarette Elizabeth Evans. The family later resided at 13, Queen's Road, Ealing, London. Lawrence was educated at Clifton College, and worked for H.M. Factories Inspectorate prior to the war. He was commissioned into the 6th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers on 28 April 1915. He was posted to France on 21 August 1915, joining the 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, which was attached to 9 Brigade, 3rd Division. Lawrence joined the battalion at Ypres, and in 1916 fought at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. The Division then moved south, and fought throughout the Battle of the Somme. In May 1917 the Division fought at the Battle of Arras, before moving back to Ypres in the summer, where they fought in the Third Battle of Ypres. In November the Division moved south again, where they fought at the Battle of Cambrai, and they were in the area during March 1918 when the German Spring Offensive swept through the British lines, at the Battle of St Quentin and the First Battle of Bapaume. They then fought at the First Battle of Arras 1918 before being moved to Flanders to rebuild. However the Germans switched the focus of their offensive to Flanders, and the Division were caught up in the worst of the fighting there, at the Battle of Estaires, and then at the Battles of Hazebrouck and Bethune. By now the German offensive had stalled, and the Division were moved south to take part in the great British offensive, and on 21 August 1918 fought at the Battle of Albert. Lawrence was killed in action on the first day of the offensive, on 21 August 1918. He was 42 years old, and is buried at Railway Cutting Cemetery, Courcelles-Le-Comte, France. His brother, Richard also fell.

Reginald Llewellyn Evans, Third Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Reginald was born at Lampeter on 19 January 1894, the son of Henry Harries Evans and Hannah Ann Evans. The family later moved to 8, St. Mary's Street, Cardigan. Reginald served as an engineer with the Mercantile Marine. He was drowned when his ship sank following a collision in the English Channel during August 1918. He was 24 years old, and is not commemorated by the CWGC. His brother, William Glyndwr Evans, was killed aboard HMS Scarborough during World War Two.

 

Richard William Picton Evans, MID, Major, Welsh Regiment. Richard was born at Cardigan in 1873, the son of William Picton Evans and Margarette Ellen Evans. His parents later resided at 13, Queen's Road, Ealing, London. Richard was educated at Cheltenham College, and married Katherine Frances Blake in London in 1901, the couple moving to Argoes, Cardigan, where Richard ran his own Solicitor's business. Katherine sadly died in 1909. Richard had served during the Boer War with the 1st Volunteer Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and by the outbreak of the Great War held the rank of Major, with the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He was posted at his own request to Alexandria in December 1916, joining the front line unit, the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 158 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. Richard played a major part in the battalions subsequent war, seeing action during the three Battles of Gaza, and the triumphant capture of Jerusalem, being wounded at Gaza. Richard died in Palestine on 13 September 1918. He was 46 years old, and is buried at Gaza War Cemetery, Israel. His brother Lawrence also fell.

Thomas Evans, Seaman, 3646A, Royal Naval Reserve. Thomas was born at Cardigan on 22 May 1881, the son of Mary Evans. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Elizabeth Evans, at 7, David Street, St. Dogmaels. Thomas served with the Royal Navy, aboard HMS Majestic. Majestic was a pre-dreadnought battleship, which had been launched in 1895, and had served with the Channel Fleet until 1904, until she was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet. In 1907, she was part of the Home Fleet, then from 1912, she was part of the 7th Battle Squadron. When World War I broke out Majestic, was attached to the Channel Fleet, and in early 1915 was dispatched to the Mediterranean for service in the Dardanelles Campaign. She participated in bombardments of Turkish forts and supported the Allied landings at Gallipoli. On 27 May 1915, she was torpedoed by a U-boat at Cape Helles, sinking with the loss of 49 men. Thomas was amongst the dead. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Frederick Robert Fearnley, Private, 50246, South Lancashire Regiment. Frederick was born at Cardigan on 20 May 1898, the son of Robert and Lucy Fearnley, of 12, William Street, Cardigan. The family later resided at The Imperial Club, Cardigan, where Robert, as an army pensioner, was working as Club Caretaker. Frederick enlisted at Cardigan into the army, and was posted to the 1/5th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment. The battalion was attached to 166 Brigade, 55th (West Lancashire) Division, and moved to France during January 1916, relieving the French 88th Division south of Arras. On 25 July 1916, the Division moved south and took up a place in the front line opposite the village of Guillemont, fighting through the Battle of the Somme. On 28 September 1916, the Division moved to the Railway Wood sector at Ypres, and fought at Pilckem Ridge. After suffering terrible casualties, the Division was withdrawn to Recques for re-fit and training, before moving back into the line on 15 September, and fighting at the Battle of the Menin Road. The Division moved out of the line from 22 September and fought at the Battle of Cambrai, being decimated during the German counter attack of 30 November 1917. After two months refitting, the Division moved into the front at Givenchy on 15 February 1918, were hit the following month by the German offensive on the Lys. Frederick was wounded in both legs, and was evacuated to the Base Hospital at Etaples for treatment. He died there on 29 April 1918, aged 19, and is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, France. His parents had retired to 135, Boundary Road, St. Helens, Lancs by then.

David Thomas Gibbons, Lance Corporal, 2132, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of Thomas and Mary Hannah Gibbons, of Castle Street, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. David was killed in action during terrible fighting here on 11 August 1915. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

Edwin Charles Gregory, Private, 73271, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Edwin was born in 1898, son of Edwin and Mary Charles Gregory, of 22, North Road, Cardigan. He enlisted at Brecon into the army, and was posted to France in the summer of 1917, where he joined the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion was at Ypres, attached to 19 Brigade, 33rd Division, and had been in France since the outbreak of war. Edwin probably joined the battalion as part of a draft after its ordeals at Arras, at the Battle of the Scarpe and at Bullecourt, before it headed to Ypres. Here it took part in the Battle of the Menin Road, and saw heavy fighting at Polygon Wood. Edwin was killed in action at Ypres on 28 November 1917. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Benjamin Griffiths, Private, 200501, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin was the son of Griffith and Mary Griffith, of 20, William Street, Cardigan. Benjamin had enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and had served at Gallipoli, Egypt and Palestine during the war. He was invalided home at the end of 1917, and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 14 May 1918. Benjamin never recovered from his ordeals, and died at Cardigan on 7 August 1920, aged 31. He is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

 

Benjamin J Griffiths, Private, 241103, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin was possibly the son of David and Rachel Griffiths, of Cardigan. Very little is yet known of him, but he served with the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, later transferring to the 5th Welsh. Benjamin doesn't look to have served overseas, and died on 3 March 1920, aged 21. He is buried at Rhymney Cemetery. (There was also a Benjamin John Griffiths, son of Elizabeth Davies, of the Cardigan Arms, who had served with the 4th Welsh, but he survived the war, being discharged from the army on 4 July 1919. He possibly died at Llanelli in 1922, aged 35).

Daniel James Griffiths, Private, 29032, Welsh Regiment. Daniel was the son of John and Ellen Griffiths, of 13, Castle Street, Cardigan. He married Mary Ellen Tierney in 1909, and the couple resided at Cardigan and then Swansea, where they had raised their three children. Daniel enlisted at Swansea into the Welsh Regiment, and was posted to France where he joined the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. He must have joined the battalion early in 1916, and joined the Battalion at Loos. The 2nd Welsh had reached Albert on 10 July 1916 after a six days march from the Loos area, and took up billets in Albert. Daniel was a member of 15 Platoon, who were billeted in a house in the town, when on 12 July a shell hit the building, killing 6 men and wounding 21 others. Daniel was amongst the dead, and is buried at Albert Communal Cemetery Extension, France. He was 29 years old. Sadly his widow, Mary had died in 1916, and their two children were orphaned.

Evan Rowland Griffiths, Private, 200662, Welsh Regiment. Evan was born at Aberystwyth in 1887, the son of Evan and Margaret Griffiths. The family had moved back to Margaret's native Cardigan prior to 1911, where she ran the family confectionary and tobacconists at Pendre, Cardigan.  Evan was married, and had lived at Carmarthen for several years prior to the war, working as a Clerk at the Barracks. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Evan was killed here, at the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

John Griffiths, Private, 5958, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. John was the son of Thomas and Mary Griffiths, of 27, Castle Street, Cardigan, and worked as a butcher in Cardigan prior to the war. He had enlisted at Cardigan into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, with the regimental number 2528, and was posted to the 2/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The battalion was attached to 182 Brigade, 61st Division, and on 21 May 1916 landed in France. The Division moved to the Fromelles area, taking over the line from the 38th (Welsh) Division, who were moving to the Somme. The Battle of the Somme had began on 1 July 1916, and the British had made no real inroads into the German defences there, so it was decided to make a feint attack at Fromelles, to attempt to keep the Germans from sending reinforcements to the Somme. On 19 July 1916 the 61st Division, and the 5th Australian Division made a suicidal assault against the strongly held German defences at Fromelles, and thousands of men were needlessly mown down. John was one of the dead that day, and was 32 years old. The regimental chaplain wrote a condolence letter to his sisters in Cardigan, stating that John had been buried and a cross erected on his grave. Sadly John is now another of the missing, and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France. He was thought to have possibly been one of the men buried at Fromelles in the mass grave, which was found several years ago, who had not so far been identified, but as the majority of the bodies recovered were of Australian soldiers, this is not likely.

Tom Griffiths, Private, 2174, Welsh Regiment. Tom was born in 1897, the son of Daniel and Mary Ann Griffiths, of the Saddlers Arms, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Tom was killed in action here on 10 August 1915, aged 18. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

William David Harper, Second Engineer, Mercantile Marine. William was born at St Dogmaels in 1886, the son of William Henry and Jane Harper, of the White Lion. He resided with his wife, Mary Anna Harper (nee Harries), at 3, Grange Town, Cardigan. William served during the Great War aboard the London based SS Cayo Bonito, a defensively armed merchant ship. On 11 October 1917, whilst 4 miles from Savona, she was torpedoed without warning and sunk by a German submarine. Six lives were lost, one of these being William David Harper. He is remembered alongside his shipmates on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Benjamin O James, Private, 33260, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin was born in St. Dogmaels in 1892, and had been raised along with his brother Thomas and sister Margaret, at 16, Castle Street, Cardigan, by their Aunt, Hannah Jones. He later moved to Caerau, Glamorgan, and enlisted at Maesteg into the 14th (Swansea City) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment, part of 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to France during the end of 1915, wintering around Armentieres before moving south, where they took part in the Battle of Mametz Wood during July, 1916. They suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the front line for almost a year, before being used in the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, where they regained some of the pride that the Division had unfairly lost at Mametz. The Division were in the Armentieres sector when the German Spring Offensive was launched in 1918, and it was here that Benjamin was killed in Action, during a German artillery bombardment on 2 April 1918. He is buried at Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery, Armentieres.

David Thomas Emyr James, Lieutenant, Mercantile Marine. David was born in 1885, the son of Captain David and Annie James of St. Dogmaels. He was a long serving mariner, and prior to the war resided with his wife Annie James, at 12, Earlsfield Road, Sefton Park, London. David served aboard the White Star Liner, RMS Laurentic, which was requisitioned at the outbreak of war by the Admiralty, and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. On 25 January 1917 the Laurentic was on a course to New York, carrying a cargo of 35 tonnes of Gold Bullion, when she struck a mine off Lough Swilly on the northern coast of County Donegal.  She sank with the loss of 350 crew, among them was David James. He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 23 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

George Edward James, Private, 92110, Notts & Derby (Sherwood Foresters). George was the son of Joseph and Mary Jane James, of 6, Feidr Fair, Cardigan. He originally enlisted at Maesteg into the Army Service Corps, and had served with them in France from 15 November 1915, but in 1918, due to a shortage of front line troops, was posted to the 16th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters, which was attached to 117 Brigade, 39th Division. During the beginning of 1918 the battalion was stationed near St. Quentin, and was one of the Divisions to be hit hard here by the German Offensive which was launched on 21 March 1918. They fought here at the Battle of St Quentin, and falling back fought at the Actions at the Somme Crossings and the Battle of Rosieres. They were moved to Flanders to rest, but April was to see the Germans launch an attack here at the Lys, and the Division fought at the First Battle of Kemmel. George was killed in action here on 25 April 1918. He was 23 years old, and is incorrectly commemorated on the Pozières Memorial, France.

John James, Able Seaman, 3721C, Royal Naval Reserve. John was born on 19 November 1874, at St Dogmaels. John had served with the Royal Navy for several years prior to the war, but had left the Navy to return to Cardigan after marrying. He resided with his wife, Annie James, at 7, William Street, Cardigan. John was recalled to the colours at the outbreak of war, serving with the Royal Naval Reserve, aboard the SS Laurentic. Laurentic was a White Star Ocean Liner, which had been built in 1908. At the outbreak of war, Laurentic was at Montreal, and was commissioned as a troop transport for the Canadian Expeditionary Force. After conversion to armed merchant cruiser service in 1915, she struck two mines off Lough Swilly in the north of Ireland on 25 January 1917 and sank within an hour, with the loss of 364 lives. John was among the dead. He was 41 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

David Jenkins, Second Engineer, Mercantile Marine. David was the son of John and Mary Jenkins (nee Rees), of Rose Vale, Northgate Terrace, Cardigan. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Kildonan, a Cardiff registered Merchant steamer. On 29 September 1917, she was two miles off the Pendeen Lighthouse, Cornwall, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine UB-35, with the loss of 14 lives. David was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

David Thomas Jenkins, Corporal, 1949, Royal Army Medical Corps. David was born at Cardigan in 1888, the son of Thomas Morgan and Mary Anne Jenkins (nee Griffiths), of 9, Grange Terrace, Cardigan.  He was a chemist prior to the war. and enlisted into the Royal Army Medical Corps on 23 November 1914. David was soon promoted to Corporal Dispenser, and attached to the 4th London Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, and was posted to France, where he served at the Military Hospital at Merville. David became ill at Merville, and was invalided out of the army, diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis. He was sent to a Hospital at Switzerland in an attempt to cure him, but he died there on 11 June 1921, aged 32. Nothing further is known of David, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

Thomas Johns, Private, 764031, London Regiment. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Jane Johns, of Plasterer's House, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan on 10 December 1915 into the 28th Battalion (Artists Rifles), London Regiment. The battalion had been an Officer Training unit, based at St. Omer, but on 28 June 1917 became attached to 190 Brigade, 63rd (Royal Naval) Division, moving to Ypres. Here Thomas saw his first major action, during the Second Battle of Passchendaele. The Divisions next major action was at Cambrai, during the Action of Welch Ridge, and they were still in the area when the Germans launched their Spring Offensive, and fought at the Battle of St Quentin, and then the First Battle of Bapaume. Thomas was badly wounded here, and died of his wounds at 29 Casualty Clearing Station on 2 April 1918. Thomas was 28 years old, and is buried at Gezaincourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

David Jones, Sailor, Mercantile Marine. David was the son of Evan and Margaret Jones, of 4, Market Lane, Cardigan. At some time prior to 1911 David had left home to serve in the Mercantile Marine, and by the time of the war was serving aboard the S.S. Campfield. David lost his life aboard ship on 29 November 1917, aged 36, and was buried at Carthagena Cemetery, Spain. He is not commemorated by the CWGC, but is commemorated on his parents grave at Cardigan Cemetery.

David Clifford Jones, Private, 68303, Royal Army Medical Corps. David was born in 1896, and was the son of Thomas Biddyr Jones, and of Anne Jones, of St. Dogmaels. He had trained in Cardigan as a chemist, and had served with the Royal Army Medical Corps in Salonika during the war. David moved to London to work as a chemist after being demobilised in 1919, and died at Lewisham, London, following a brief illness on 19 May 1920, aged 24. he was brought home for burial at St. Dogmaels. He is not commemorated by the CWGC. His father, Thomas was killed when his ship was lost on 12 December 1918.

 

David Morgan Jones, Private, 2520, Welsh Regiment. David enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. David was killed in action here on 10 August 1915, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

David Owen Jones, Engineer, Mercantile Marine. David was born at Cardigan in 1875, the son of Mary Jones. By 1891 the family was residing at 1, Upper Spring Gardens, Cardigan. David became an engineer with the Mercantile Marine, and by the outbreak of war was serving aboard the oil tanker S.S. San Jeronimo, which was owned by the Eagle Oil Transport Company. He died on active service on 26 November 1916, aged 41. Nothing further can be traced of David, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

David Sydney Jones, Engineer, Mercantile Marine. David, known as Sydney, was the son of Thomas and Sarah Jane Jones, of Queen's Terrace, Cardigan. He served with the Mercantile Marine as an engineer aboard the Union Class steamer R.M.S. Norman. She was requisitioned by the Admiralty at the outbreak of war, and utilised as a troopship, ferrying the first troops of the B.E.F. from Britain to France in August 1914. He died in London on 20 January 1915, aged 25, and was brought home for burial in Cardigan Cemetery. Sydney is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Elizabeth Ann Jones, Munitions Worker. Elizabeth was the daughter of David and Mary Anne Jones, of Williams Row, Cardigan. She had worked at Pembrey Munitions Factory, and died at Cardigan on 23 October 1916, aged 22. She is buried in Cardigan Cemetery. Civilians are not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC during WW1.

 

Evan Lloyd Jones, Private, 91695, Durham Light Infantry. Evan was born on 4 February 1899, the son of John Lloyd Jones and Jane Jones, of Ossian House, Eben's Lane, Cardigan. He worked as a Bank Clerk prior to enlisting at Brecon on 12 March 1917 into the Pembroke Yeomanry, and on 12 April 1918 was transferred to the 1/6th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, which was attached to 151 Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division. During March 1918 the battalion was stationed near St. Quentin, and was hit here by the German Spring Offensive of 21 March 1918, during the Battle of St Quentin. The division took part in a gallant rearguard action during the Actions at the Somme Crossings, and then at the Battle of Rosieres, suffering terrible casualties. Evan was captured by the Germans on the Somme during May 1918, and was taken to a Prisoner of War Camp at Worms in Germany, where he died on 4 October 1918, aged 19. Evan is buried at Worms (Hochheim Hill) Cemetery, Germany.

Harold Madoc Jones, MID, Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Harold was the son of John Roberts Jones, J.P. of Bodfeirig, Anglesey, and Eunice Martha Jones. He was educated at Christ's College, Brecon and University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, where he graduated with Classical Honours, before becoming a teacher at Cardigan School, lodging at 2, Park Terrace, Cardigan. Harold originally enlisted into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers as a Private, but was commissioned into the 17th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 18 March 1915. The battalion was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 4 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. After two days of heavy hand to hand fighting within the wood, the Germans withdrew, and the battered Welshmen moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal, where it remained until launching its attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. Harold was killed at Pilckem on 31 July 1917. He was 38 years old, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Harold had been Mentioned in Despatches for his bravery twice during the war.

Thomas Griffith Jones, Private, 2150, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at Cardigan, the son of David and Anne Jones. He resided with his wife, Frances Anne Jones at Cilgerran. The couple had a son, David Thomas Jones, who was later sadly killed during the Second World War. Thomas was one of many local men to enlist at Cardigan at the outbreak of war, into the local Territorial Battalion, the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion moved to Tunbridge Wells in November 1914 as part of the South Wales Brigade, and in February 1915 moved to the Forth and Tay Defences in Scotland. In April they were posted to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, which moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July, 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on the 9th August. Here they spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Thomas was one of many men to lose his life during these terrible first few days on the Gallipoli Peninsula. He was killed on 11 August 1915, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

William Mathias Jones, Gunner, 118779, Royal Field Artillery. William was the son of Levi Thomas Jones and Anne Jones, of Nantgwyn, Blaenffos. He resided at Cardigan prior to the war, and enlisted into the Royal Artillery.  William was posted to France in 1916, where he joined C Battery, 108th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. He was killed in action during the opening of the Third Battle of Ypres, when a German shell crashed into his gun pit on 1 August 1917. William was 23 years old, and is buried at Potijze Chateau Wood Cemetery, Belgium.

Evan James Knight, Private, 49234, South Wales Borderers. Evan was born at Haverfordwest, the son of John and Elizabeth Knight. The family moved to Arthur's Court, Cardigan after John retired from the army. Evan married Caroline Humphreys, of 21, Mwldan, Cardigan in 1918, just after enlisting at Carmarthen into the army. He was posted to France to join the 10th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The 38th Division was in positions north of Albert, where it remained until launching its attack across the River Ancre on 21 August 1918. The Welshmen drove the Germans from Thiepval Ridge and Pozières, and began their offensive towards the mighty Hindenburg Line. Evan was killed at Épehy on 20 September 1918. He was just 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France. His widow later remarried, becoming Caroline Davies, of 1, Parade Road, Carmarthen. (The memorial incorrectly shows Thomas Knight, the younger brother).

John Knight, Private, 1990, Welsh Regiment. John was born at Hamilton, Ontario in 1867. He was an army pensioner and resided at Arthur's Court, Cardigan prior to the war, with his wife Elizabeth Knight and their two sons. He re-enlisted at Cardigan into the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion moved to France at the outbreak of war, attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division had been one of the first to arrive in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and taking part in the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, and at Chivy, before being moved north to Ypres. Here they fought at the First Battle of Ypres, where they again stopped the German Offensive, before wintering in Flanders. The following year saw them in action again at the Battle of Aubers. John was killed in action here on 30 March 1915, aged 48. He is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg L'Avoue, France. His son, Evan James Knight also fell.

John Emrys Ladd, Private, 235040, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. John was born in 1893, the son of Charles and Hannah Ladd, of Trefaes, Moylegrove. He married Martha Rees on 2 September 1913 and the couple set up home at Danybryn, St. Dogmaels, where they raised their three children. John enlisted at Brecon into the South Wales Borderers on 4 September 1916, with the service number 3847, but later transferred into the 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 10 April 1917, which was in France attached to 76 Brigade, 25th Division. John joined the battalion at Arras. He saw his first major action there, during the capture of Roeux. John was wounded here, and sadly died of his wounds aged just 23, on 15 June 1917. John is buried in Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun, France. 

Tom Ladd, Private, 2187, Welsh Regiment. Tom was born at Cardigan in 1895, the son of William and Mary Ladd, of 3, Bath House Road, Cardigan. Tom remained in Britain for the duration of the war, after having enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment at Cardigan he later served with the London Regiment, but after being discharged due to ill-health, he rejoined the 4th Welsh. Tom died at Cardigan on 13 January 1919, aged 23, and is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

Walter Llewellyn Ladd, Private, 2141, Welsh Regiment. Walter was born in 1893, the son of John and Hannah Mary Ladd, of 7, Church Street, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Walter didn't get overseas however, as he remained in Pembrokeshire with the 4th Welsh Reserves. He was demobilised in order to return to his work as a Blacksmith at Cardigan, but kept on the Territorial Reserve List. Walter drowned following a boating accident in the Teify on 21 August 1916, aged 23. His body was eventually recovered from the river, and buried at Cardigan Cemetery. For some reason, Walter is not named on the Cardigan Cenotaph, but on the St. Mary's Church Memorial.

William John Lambert, Gunner, 701802, Royal Field Artillery. William was the son of Edward and Alice Lambert, of Teston, Kent. He resided at Finch Square, Cardigan prior to the war, with his wife Margaret, who he had married in 1906. He enlisted at Woolwich into the Royal Artillery, and landed in France on 29 September 1915, attached to the Royal Field Artillery. When the 66th Division moved to France in March 1917, William was posted to the 66th Division Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery, which took up positions on the Flanders Coast. Within weeks, the Division was moved to the Gorre sector. On 25 May 1917, William was at work when a German shell fell nearby. He went to pick it up, but it exploded, and killed him. William was 37 years old, and is buried at Gorre British and Indian Cemetery, France.

Parry Maclean, Private, RMA/13461, Royal Marine Artillery. Parry was born at Cardigan on 13 January 1895, the son of Robert and Elizabeth MacLean, of 14, William Street. The family later resided at 30, Oxford Road, Albert Road, Southsea, Portsmouth. Parry enlisted here into the Royal Marine Artillery, and was posted aboard HMS Ocean, taking part in the Gallipoli campaign, and was aboard her when she was sunk off Gallipoli. After the evacuation of Gallipoli in January 1916, Parry was posted to HMS Defence as a Gunner. Defence was a Minotaur-class armoured cruiser, which was stationed in the Mediterranean at the outbreak of war, and took part in the pursuit of the German battlecruiser SMS Goeben and light cruiser SMS Breslau. Defence was transferred to the Grand Fleet in January 1915. On 31 May 1916 the Grand Fleet fought a great battle against the German High Seas Fleet, called the Battle of Jutland. Defence was sunk on 31 May 1916 during the Battle of Jutland, when she was struck by two salvoes from the Germans that detonated her rear magazine. The fire from that explosion spread to the ship's secondary magazines, which exploded in turn. The entire crew was lost in the resulting explosion. Parry was 21 years old when he died that day, and he is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Frank Reginald Miles, Apprentice, Mercantile Marine. Frank was the son of Thomas Griffith Miles and Sophia Miles, of 23, William Street, Cardigan. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Trewyn, a St. Ives registered cargo vessel. On 24 March 1916, Trewyn was on a voyage from Algiers to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore, when she was sunk by the German submarine U-28. All 23 of her crew were lost. Frank was 20 years old, and is commemorated alongside his shipmates on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His brother Griffith William Miles was killed at sea during WW2.

 

D. G. Morgan. This man cannot be identified. He is commemorated on the St. Mary's Church Memorial but not on the main Cenotaph.

Johnnie Morgan, Private, 200499, Welsh Regiment. Johnnie was born at Cardigan, and was the husband of Frances Margaret (Fanny) Morgan, of Foundry Terrace, Cardigan. He enlisted in the town into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Johnnie was killed in action during the Third Battle of Gaza, on 3 November 1917. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel.

John James Morgan, Seaman, 1984C, Royal Naval Reserve. John was born in Cardigan on 21 January 1878, the son of Thomas Morgan, of Quay Street. By 1911 he was working in Cardiff Docks, and lived with his wife Maud J. Morgan at 16, Orchard Place, Canton, Cardiff. John was an Royal Naval Reservist and was recalled to the colours at the outbreak of war, joining the crew of the mothballed pre-dreadnought battleship HMS Goliath at Pembroke Dock. She was re-commissioned and took part in operations against German East Africa, participating in the blockade of the German light cruiser SMS Königsberg in the Rufiji River. From March 1915, she joined the force assembled in the Mediterranean to support the Gallipoli Campaign, and supported of the landings at Gallipoli in April. On 13 May 1915 Goliath was sunk in Morto Bay by two torpedoes from the Turkish torpedo boat destroyer Muâvenet-i Millîye, with the loss of 570 of her crew of 700. John was 37 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

Llewellyn Morgan, Able Seaman, L21/393, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Llewellyn was born on 31 July 1892, the son of John and Sophia Morgan, of Llwyn-On, Priory Street, Cardigan. He resided at the Grange, Colcot, Barry, Glamorgan prior to the war, where he worked as an electrical engineer, and enlisted on 17 February 1915 into the Public Schools Battalion, London Regiment. He transferred to Hawke Battalion, Royal Naval Division on 4 May 1915, and served at Gallipoli, before being invalided in August 1915 suffering from Enteritis. Llewellyn then rejoined Hawke Battalion, before being invalided to Britain with Nephritis on 26 December 1915. After recovering, he was sent to France with a Draft on 10 July 1916, and rejoined Hawke Battalion. Llewellyn fought at the Battle of the Ancre that year. The Royal Naval Division remained on the Ancre over the winter of 1916-17. Llewellyn was badly wounded there when a shell fragment hit him in the eye. He died of wounds in 47th Casualty Clearing Station on 6 February 1917, aged 24, and is buried at Varennes Military Cemetery, France. 

John Morgan Morris, Private, 2193, Australian Imperial Force. John was the son of John and Ann Morris, of Forest House, St. Dogmaels. He had emigrated to Australia, and enlisted at Newcastle, N.S.W. on 9 May 1916 into the 36th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. John embarked at Sydney aboard the HMAT Anchises, and disembarked at Devonport on 11 October that year. On 11 November 1916 his papers show that he marched to join the 3rd Australian Division, proceeding to France on 22 November. John was wounded at Ypres on 11 July 1917, and was brought to the 10th Australian Field Ambulance, where he died of Wounds that same day. He was 45 years old, and is buried in Kandahar Farm Cemetery near Ypres. Many thanks to Andrew Holmes for the photograph.

William Andrew Morris, Third Engineer, Mercantile Marine. William was the son of Jane Morris, of 6, Osborne Terrace, Brynmill, Swansea. He was raised by his grandparents, Richard and Esther Morgan, at 6, Tivy Terrace, Cardigan. He served in the Mercantile Marine as Third Engineer aboard the S.S. Blagdon. William died in Greenwich on 22 October 1916, aged 22. He was brought home for burial in Cardigan Cemetery. He is not commemorated by the CWGC because his death was not due to enemy action, but the SS Blagdon was later torpedoed and sunk in 1917.

 

David Edward Owens, Sergeant, 111963, Tank Corps. David, known as Teddy, was the son of John and Mary Jane Owens, of 18, Quay Street, Cardigan. He was a tailor, and lived at 4, St Hildas Road, Griffithstown prior to the war. On 20 August 1913 he married Lydia Parfitt, of Pontypool. He had served with the 1st Volunteer Battalion, Welsh Regiment during the Boer War, and on 11 August 1916 rejoined the colours at Pontypool, and was posted to the Tank Corps. He saw service with the Tank Corps until being demobilised on 15 April 1919, and returned to Pontypool. His wife Lydia had died in 1918, and in 1920 Teddy married her younger sister Ada Jane Parfitt. David's health had suffered during the war, and he died at Pontypool on 9 May 1921, aged 42. He is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

David Griffith Owen, Second Lieutenant, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. David was born on 6 May 1889, the son of John and Margaret Anne Owen, of Bryneirw, St Mary's, Cardigan. He had emigrated to Australia prior to the war, and on 30 September 1914 enlisted at Brisbane into the 15th Battalion, Australian Infantry. David served at Gallipoli with the battalion, and after the evacuation in January 1916 was discharged on 21 January 1916 to a commission into the 3rd Battalion, Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. David became ill, suffering from jaundice, probably contracted at Gallipoli, and died in hospital in England on 23 November 1916, aged 27. David is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

George Owens, Deck Hand, 3478SD, Royal Naval Reserve. George was born on 31 March 1887, the son of Evan and Elizabeth Owens, of Grange House, Grangetown, Cardigan. He served with the Royal Naval Reserve aboard the SS Mariston, a defensively armed Merchant steamer. On 15 July 1917, when 82 miles West of Fastnet, Ireland, on route from Almeria to the Clyde, she was torpedoed without warning and sunk by the German submarine U-45, with the loss of 28 lives. George was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

John Owen, Driver, T/1863, Royal Army Service Corps. John was born at Cardigan, but resided at Newcastle Emlyn prior to the war. He enlisted at Pentre into the Army Service Corps, and was attached to the Welsh Division Train, part of the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here they immediately faced the chaotic leadership that was to lead to the ultimate failure of the campaign, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack. The Division remained here throughout the coming months in terrible conditions, and John was taken ill. He was evacuated to the Base Hospital at Alexandria where he sadly died on 23 September 1915. He is buried there at Alexandria (Chatby) Military Cemetery, Egypt.

 

David Christmas Phillips, Private, 36961, Gloucester Regiment. David was the son of David and Rachael Phillips, of Fron Moylegrove, St. Dogmaels. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 4th Welsh, but was later transferred into the 10th Battalion, Gloucester Regiment. On 8 August 1915 the Battalion landed in France as part of the 26th Division, and just nine days later moved into 1 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division fought at the Battle of Loos, before moving to the Somme, fighting in most of the battles which made up the Somme Offensive of 1916. In 1917 they moved to Flanders, and fought at the Second Battle of Passchendaele, where David was unfortunately killed in Action, on 30 September 1917 aged only 20. He is buried in Buffs Road Cemetery, near Ypres. 

Gwilym Phillips, Second Lieutenant, Gloucestershire Regiment. Gwilym was the son of William and Elizabeth Phillips, of 21, St. Mary Street, Cardigan. He enlisted into the Devonshire Regiment, and landed in France on 11 January 1917. Gwilym gained a commission into the 4th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment on 30 October 1917, and was attached to the 1/8th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, which was attached to 125 Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division. He joined the battalion at Givenchy, where it remained until moving back south in early 1918. Here the Division faced the German Spring Offensive of 21 March on the Somme, and fought in the Battle of Bapaume, and then at Arras. The offensive stalled for several months, until an Australian victory at Villers Brettoneux on 8 August saw the tide of war turn. The British attacked the German lines on the Somme on 21 August, with the 42nd Division in the line, and began the great offensive that was eventually to end the war. The Division fought at the Battle of Albert, then the Battle of Bapaume, and on to the Canal du Nord. Gwilym was killed in action here on 13 October 1918. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Romeries Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

Joseph Jenkins Protheroe, MM, Private, 12539, Somerset Light Infantry. Joseph was born at Cardigan in 1881, the son of Esther Protheroe, a sailors wife. He worked as a miner at Ystradfodwg prior to the war, and enlisted at Ferndale into the 7th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry. The battalion was attached to 61 Brigade, 20th (Light) Division, which landed in France on 26 July 1915, moving to the Fleurbaix Sector for trench familiarisation and training. When the Battle of Loos was launched on 25 September 1915 the Division fought a diversionary attack towards Fromelles. Later that year they moved north, and fought at the Battle of Mount Sorrel alongside the Canadian Corps. They then fought through the Somme Offensive. Joseph was killed at the Battle of Delville Wood on 1 September 1916. He was 35 years old, and is buried at Dantzig Alley British Cemetery, Mametz, France. He had been awarded the Military Medal just previous to his death.

Benjamin Rees, Gunner, 161237, Royal Garrison Artillery. Benjamin was the son of Evan and Mary Rees, of 5, Church Street, Cardigan. He enlisted at Aberdare into the Royal Artillery, and was posted to the 13th Mountain Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. The battery was armed with 3.7 inch howitzers, and joined VIII Mountain Brigade, R.G.A. at Catterick on 11 July 1917. The Battery sailed from Southampton on 23 August 1917 and concentrated at Sidi Bishr in Egypt. Benjamin took ill, and died in hospital at Alexandria on 31 October 1918, aged 24. He is buried at Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt. His brother John also fell.

 

John Rees, Private, 29572, South Wales Borderers. John was the son of Evan and Mary Rees, of 5, Church Street, Cardigan. He had originally enlisted into the 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers, but must have been deemed to have been unfit for front line service, and was posted to the Labour Corps. John never served overseas, and died on 17 November 1918, aged 26. He is buried at Cardigan Cemetery. His brother Benjamin also fell.

Benjamin Richards, Private, 128854, Machine Gun Corps. Benjamin was the son of Joshua and Patsy Richards, of Union Terrace, St. Dogmaels. He enlisted at Treorchy into the Monmouth Regiment, with the service number 47085. In early 1916, Battalion Machine Gunners were transferred into newly formed Machine Gun Companies, and Benjamin joined the 59th Battalion, M.G.C., joining the 20th (Light) Division on 3 March 1916. The Division fought at the Battle of Mount Sorrel during June, 1916 alongside the Canadians, then were moved south to the Somme, fighting at Delville Wood, Guillemont, Flers, Morval and Le Transloy. They moved north to Ypres, taking part in several stages of the Battle of Passchendaele, and also fought at the Battle of Cambrai, and the 1918 Battles of St. Quentin, the Somme Crossings and Rosieres. Benjamin was taken Prisoner by the Germans at some stage in 1918, and Died in captivity on 3 July 1918, aged 25. He is buried in Niederzwehren Cemetery, Germany.

George Ivor Milton Phillips Richards, Private, 200484, Welsh Regiment. George was the son of  Captain David and Annie Ida Richards, of Kelvin, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. George was killed here at the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917, passing away in the arms of a fellow soldier. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

Thomas Richard Richbell. Thomas was born at Stratford, Essex in 1882, the son of Thomas and Emily Richbell. He worked for HM Customs and Excise at Cardigan prior to the war, and married Myfanwy  Morgan, of Cardigan, at Bradford on 5 April 1907. The couple later resided at Gwalia, Clynderwen, after having renewed their vows at Cardigan in 1908. Thomas looks to have been posted as missing presumed killed in France on 15 October 1916, and probate was left to Myfanwy. The CWGC however records Thomas as having died on 5 February 1919, aged 42, and being buried at Richmond Cemetery, Surrey. His next of kin was shown as his wife, Alice Emma Richbell, of 8, James Cottages, Kew Rd., Kew, while the last that can be found about Myfanwy is her sailing for Sri Lanka. Did Myfanwy emigrate, believing her husband was dead, when he was actually a POW, or is it a case of two men with the same uncommon name, serving with the RAVC?

William Baxter Roberts, Driver, 701699, Royal Field Artillery. William was born at Machynlleth in 1884, the son of Elizabeth Ellen Roberts. He resided at Cardigan for several years prior to the war, where he managed Messrs Dick's Boot's Store. He married Mary Lavinia Sharpe of Green Meadow, St. Dogmaels prior to enlisting into the army in 1916. William was posted to the Royal Field Artillery late in 1916, joining their B Battery, 330th Brigade. The Battery was attached to the 66th Division from March 1917 to March 1918, and fought through the Battle of Poelcappelle. William was killed in action here on 31 July 1917. He was 33 years old, and is buried at Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium.

John Gale Southby, Private, 2521, Welsh Regiment. John was born at Middlesex in 1894, the son of James and Catherine Southby. He resided at Trebared, Cardigan prior to the war, and enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. John was wounded at Gallipoli, and was invalided home for treatment. He died in hospital on 1 February 1916, aged 21, and is buried at Netley Military Cemetery, Hampshire.

John Lawrence Stephens, Sailor, Mercantile Marine. John was born in Cardigan in 1902, the son of John and Anne Stephens, of Bath House Road, Cardigan. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Bradboyne. On 6 February 1920, the S.S. Bradboyne was caught in a strong gale in the North Atlantic, while en route from New York to Cherbourg with a cargo of wheat, and got into difficulties when her cargo shifted in the swell. The S.S. Oxonian had pulled near her after receiving a distress call, but owing to the heavy seas and the state of the Bradboyne, she could not lower her lifeboats. Some men jumped overboard and were hauled into a rescue ship, but it overturned. After a gallant attempt to rescue the beleaguered crew, six of the rescuers were themselves drowned, as well as fourteen crewmen of the Bradboyn. John was just 17 years old when he lost his life that day. He is not commemorated by the CWGC because he is not an official war casualty.

 

Alfred William Thomas, Second Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Alfred was born at St. Davids, and was the Husband of Hetty Isabella Thomas, of 2, Lloyd's Terrace, St. Dogmaels. He had been secretary at St. Mary’s Church, Cardigan prior to the war, and joined the Mercantile Marine as an Engineer, serving aboard the SS Memnon, a Liverpool registered ship. The Memnon was a 3,203grt British Merchant steamer. On 12 March 1917 when twenty miles South-West from Portland Bill in the English Channel she was torpedoed without warning and sunk by German submarine UC-66. Six lives were lost, Alfred being one of them, after he had just gone below to the engine room to carry out some work, just before the torpedo struck. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Alfred was awarded a medal for gallantry at sea, for saving the life of a fellow crewman who fell overboard in shark infested waters while at sea in 1912.

 

David Howell Thomas, Private, 4089, Welsh Regiment. David was born in 1888, the son of William and Margaret Thomas, of Carningly, Cardigan. He worked as a Collier prior to the war, residing at Church Street, Seven Sisters, but had enlisted at Carmarthen in April 1913 into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. David attended the annual TA camps at Haverfordwest and Porthmadoc in 1913 and 1914, and was embodied on 4 August 1914, after the declaration of war, joining the Battalion at The Blockhouse, Pembroke. He sailed for Gallipoli with the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. David was shot in the foot during the terrible fighting of the first few days, and was evacuated home for treatment. After he recovered, he began working at the Pembrey Munitions Works. He died at Burry Port of influenza and pneumonia on 3 November 1918, aged 30 and was buried in Cardigan Cemetery. David is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Evan James Thomas, Private, 57071, North Staffordshire Regiment. Evan was the son of Mrs. Meta James Thomas, of 21, North Road, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan on 28 August 1917 into the army, and was posted to the 9th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment, which was in France attached to the 37th Division as the Divisional Pioneers, landing at Boulogne on 1 April 1918. Evan wasn't long in France before he was wounded by a German gas shell on 12 May 1918. He suffered for two days, before dying at 48 Field Ambulance on 14 May 1918, aged 18. Evan is buried at Bagneux British Cemetery, Gézaincourt, France.

Thomas Thomas, Captain, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of John and Mary Ann Thomas, of Stradey House, Llwynhendy, Llanelli. His father was an Insurance Agent, and moved the family to 4, Gordon Terrace, Cardigan. Thomas was educated at Cardigan School and at Aberystwyth University prior to the war. He was commissioned from the 14th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers into the 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the 2nd Rhondda Battalion, which was raised in August 1914, becoming attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division the following year. In December 1915 the Division moved to France, and took the line near Fleurbaix, where it was initiated into trench warfare. In June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, where it took part in the famous capture of Mametz Wood between 7 to 11 July. It was then moved north, to positions on the Canal Bank at Boesinghe, where it remained for the next twelve months. On 31 July 1917 the Division launched an attack on the Pilckem Ridge, capturing their objectives, with heavy loss of life. After a brief rest, the 13th Welsh moved back into the line on the Steenbeek, and it was here, on 23 August 1917, that Thomas was killed by German shellfire. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium, in Grave IV. F. 1.

Tommy Thomas, Private, 1003, Australian Imperial Force. Tommy was born at Llanfyrnach in 1889, the son of Thomas and Mary Thomas. Thomas and Mary later moved to 1, Bridge Street, Port Talbot, while Tommy went to live at North Gate Terrace, Cardigan, where he worked as a carpenter. Tommy emigrated to Australia prior to the war, and enlisted at Queensland on 17 June 1915 into the 25th Battalion, Australian Infantry. The 25th Battalion was raised at Enoggera in Queensland in March 1915 as part of the 7th Brigade, leaving Australia in early July 1915. It trained in Egypt during August, and in September 1915 landed at Gallipoli, where it reinforced the depleted New Zealand and Australian Division. The 25th Battalion left the peninsular on 18 December 1915. After further training in Egypt, the 25th Battalion proceeded to France, landing on 19 March 1916, where it became attached to the 2nd Division. It took part in its first major battle at Pozières between 25 July and 7 August in the course of which it suffered 785 casualties. Tommy was wounded on 31 August, suffering multiple gunshot wounds, and was evacuated to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen. He died of his wounds on 15 September 1916, aged 28, and is buried at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

William Edgar Thomas, DSO, MC, Lieutenant-Colonel, East Yorkshire Regiment. William was born in 1884, the son of Morgan and Lydia Thomas, of Penybryn, Pontypridd, Glamorgan. He worked at Lloyds Bank, Cardigan prior to the war. William originally enlisted into the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, but was commissioned into the East Yorkshire Regiment, and landed in France on 13 November 1917, where he joined the 7th Battalion, Border Regiment. The battalion was attached to 51 Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division. Within months of arriving in France, William was awarded the Military Cross, and was promoted to the command of the battalion, after showing great leadership qualities and bravery while commanding a part of 50 men who consolidated and held for six days a recently blown mine crater. In March 1918 the Division was on the Somme, and faced the German Spring Offensive there, fighting at the Battle of St Quentin. After a period out of the line to rest and rebuild, the Division moved to the southernmost sector of the Somme area, where they fought at the Battle of Amiens on 8 August 1918, a day which saw the war swing in the favour of the Allies. The Allies then advanced on the Somme, and the Division fought at the Battle of Albert later that month, then on to the Battle of Bapaume on 31 August, and towards the Hindenburg Line, fighting at the Battle of Havrincourt on 12 September and the Battle of Epehy on 18 September. At the beginning of October the mighty Hindenburg Line was broken, and the 17th Division swept towards Cambrai, fighting at the Battle of Cambrai on 8 October, and then north-east through northern France, towards the old Battlefields of Mons and Le Cateau. On 28 October 1918 the 7th Battalion, Border Regiment was tasked with the capture of the village of Amerval near Le Cateau.  Having successfully captured the village the Borders were forced out again as the Germans counterattacked. They again assaulted the village and regained control of it just after dark. During this phase of the fight for the village, William was shot and killed by a German sniper. He was 36 years old, and is buried at Amerval Communal Cemetery Extension, Solesmes, France. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his work at Amerval. The citation was published in the London Gazette of 2 December 1918, and read; 'He commanded two companies in an outflanking movement to capture a village which was strongly held by the enemy. By his able dispositions and fearless leading he succeeded, with only two casualties, in taking four machine gums and fifty prisoners. The advance was then continued, .and the whole village finally captured. His fine example of courage and leadership inspired all ranks.'

William John Thomas, Private, 75173, Royal Army Medical Corps. William was the son of Mary Thomas, of Ponthirwain, Llechryd. He resided with his wife, Martha Thomas, at 12, Glogue Terrace, Glogue, prior to the war, and enlisted at Cardigan into the Royal Army Medical Corps. William was posted to France, probably early in 1917, where he joined the 54th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps., which was attached to the 18th (Eastern) Division. In March 1917 the Division followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and in May took part in the Third Battle of the Scarpe, which was part of the Arras Offensive. Later hat year the Division fought at Third Ypres. In 1918 the Division were stationed south of the Somme, and were one of the Divisions hit there by the German Spring Offensive, which was launched on 21 March 1918. They fought at the Battle of St Quentin, and suffered terrible casualties, and then took part in the Battle of the Avre and the Actions of Villers-Bretonneux. On 8 August 1918 they formed part of the force which attacked the German positions around Villers Brettoneux, south of the Somme Valley, during the Battle of Amiens, and then took part in the Battle of Albert, which began the great push by the Allies which ended the war. William was killed in action during fighting at Franvillers on 22 August 1918. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Franvillers Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

Llewellyn George Tudor,  Private, 201594, Tank Corps. Llewellyn was the son of James and Hettie Tudor, of Brynderi, Cardigan.  He originally enlisted at Cardigan into the 4th Welsh, and was posted to the Tank Corps. Llewellyn landed in France at some time in 1916, joining I Battalion, Tank Corps. Tanks had first been used on the Somme in 1916, with varying success. Around 60 tanks saw action at the Battle of Arras in April 1917, but proved to be a failure due to the weather. By the summer of 1917 tank numbers had increased and the better Mark IV's were available, but they again failed at Third Ypres, due to the weather, and mud. On 20 November 1917, an attack was launched at Cambrai, and after a heavy artillery bombardment, 378 Mark IV tanks smashed through the Hindenburg Line positions. Insufficient mobile reserves could get through in time to exploit the tanks success, and within days the chance had gone, the counter-attacking Germans recaptured most of their lost positions. I Battalion was in support of the 20th (Light) Division's attack. Llewellyn was killed at Cambrai on 23 November 1917. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.                

Albert Victor Walker,  Private, 2193, Welsh Regiment. Albert was born at Dublin in 1897, the son of Albert Drury Walker and Mary Walker. The family were living at Brontivy, Cardigan by 1906, where Albert's father worked as a Dentist. Albert enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Albert was killed in action here on 10 August 1915, aged 18. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

Thomas William Waters, Private, 2164, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at West Hartlepool in 1877, the son of James and Isabella Waters, and resided at Cardigan prior to 1897, working as a harness maker. He married Mary Ann at Cardigan in 1897, and the couple resided at Newtown, Cardigan, where they raised their son. At the outbreak of war Thomas enlisted into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Thomas died within months of mobilisation, on 1 January 1915. He was 38 years old, and is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

 

Lewis Wigley, First Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Lewis was born at Cardigan in 1874. He married Emily Corbetta Rees in 1909, and resided with her at Catalone, Lion Terrace, Cardigan. Lewis was a long serving engineer in the Mercantile Marine, and during the Great War served aboard the SS Brika. Brika was a defensively-armed Merchant ship. On 13 March 1917, she was 13 miles from Coningbeg Light Vessel, Ireland, when she was torpedoed without warning and sunk by a German submarine. Lewis was one of two men who died that day. He was 42 years old, and was brought home for burial at Cardigan Cemetery.

 

David Matthew Williams, Private, 91420, Durham Light Infantry. David was born on 17 July 1899, the son of William and Martha Williams, of 2, Llynyfelin Cottages, Cardigan. He enlisted into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 8 October 1917, and was posted to France, joining the 1/9th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry on 6 August 1918. The battalion was the Pioneer Battalion to 62nd (2nd West Riding) Division. David took part in the advance to victory over the coming weeks. On 12 September the Division captured Havrincourt. Two weeks later it captured Marcoing and Masnieres, important crossings of the Saint-Quentin Canal. Further advances were made on 29 September and up to 1 October 1918. On 20 October, the Division was in action once again, this time in the crossing of the River Selle, at Solesmes. By 4 November, the enemy by now being in full retreat, the Division attacked at Orsinval on the Sambre and five days later, the advanced units were entering Maubeuge. Within days of the armistice, David became ill, suffering from influenza. He was evacuated home, but died at Whalley Military Hospital on 10 March 1919. David was just 19 years old, and his body was brought home for burial at Y Ferwig (St. Pedrog) Churchyard.

 

David Morgan Williams, Rifleman, 371433, London Regiment. David was the son of Owen and Catherine Williams, of 7, Queen's Terrace, Cardigan. He enlisted at London into the army, and was posted to France with the 8th Battalion (Post Office Rifles), London Regiment, which was attached to 140 Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. The Division had been in France since March 1915, and David joined the battalion on 28 October 1915, at Arras. They were north of Arras when the Germans attacked Vimy Ridge, and then moved south to the Somme, where they fought at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, and then at the Battle of Le Transloy, where the Division captured Eaucourt l'Abbe, and took part in Attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. Early in 1917 the Division moved north to Belgium, and took part in the Battle of Messines. David was killed in action here on 10 June 1917. He was 22 years old, and is buried at White House Cemetery, St. Jan-Les-Ypres, Belgium. His brother, Owen also fell.

Ellen Myfanwy Williams, Nurse, Red Cross. Ellen was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Williams, of 38, Feidr Fawr, Cardigan. She trained as a Nurse, and by 1911 was working at West Bromwich Hospital. She continued to nurse wounded soldiers there during the war, but took ill and died at West Bromwich on 19 January 1915, aged 26. She was brought home for burial in Cardigan Cemetery.

 

Owen John Williams, Private, 2135, Welsh Regiment. Owen was the son of Owen and Catherine Williams, of 7, Queen's Terrace, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Owen was badly wounded during the initial fighting, and was evacuated by hospital ship to Egypt. He died at Chatby Military Hospital on 30 August 1915, aged 20, and is buried at Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt. His brother, David also fell.

 

William Thomas Williams, First Mate, Mercantile Marine. William was the son of John Andrew and Anne Williams of Cardigan. He resided with his wife, Eleanor Williams (nee Williams), at Ivy Cottage, Penybryn, Cilgerran prior to the war, and served with the Mercantile Marine, aboard  the S.S. Treveal, a St. Ives registered cargo vessel. On 4 February 1918, Treveal was on route from Algiers for Barrow she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-53 and sunk, off the Skerries, Anglesey. William was amongst 33 men who died aboard her that day. He was 49 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Harry Woodward, Sergeant, 2131, Welsh Regiment. Harry was born at Cardigan in 1890, the son of Joseph and Anna Woodward, of 3, Gloster Row, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Harry was killed here on 10 August 1915. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

Albert George Wyatt, Private, 2136, Welsh Regiment. Albert was the Husband of Mary Lavinia Wyatt, of 6, Queen's Terrace, Cardigan. He enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. Albert was invalided home in January 1916 after contracting enteric fever. He never recovered properly, and was discharged from the army as unfit for further overseas on 4 July 1916. Albert succumbed to his illness, and died at Cardigan on 27 October 1918, aged 32. He is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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