West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Cardigan WW2 War Memorial

Cardigan lies on the estuary of the River Teifi at the point where Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire meet. The site was chosen as a strategically important point for the building of its Norman Castle, by Robert Montgomery in 1093. It was the county town of the pre-1974 county of Cardiganshire, and is the second largest town in Ceredigion. In 1199 the town received its first charter and was an important trade centre, with the river becoming an important port, where goods were imported and exported all over the world, until the river silted up. During both World Wars, Cardigan contributed a large number of men and women to the forces, and many of these were to sadly lose their lives. The fallen are commemorated on the Cardigan Cenotaph, which is located at Victoria Gardens on North Road. There is a fine marble memorial in St. Mary's Church at Cardigan which replicates the same names of those who fell during the Great War.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Donald Adams. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

Henry Charles Booker, Private, Home Guard. Henry was the son of Edmund and Lillian Booker, of Bristol, and the husband of Lillian Booker, of Bristol. He served with the 2nd Cardiganshire Battalion, Home Guard. Henry died on active service on 7 March 1944, aged 37, and is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

William James Bowen, Assistant Steward, 213674, Naval Auxiliary Personnel (Merchant Navy). William was from Cardigan, but had run away from home to go to sea, probably ending up in Dinas. He initially served in the Merchant Navy, before being seconded to the Royal Navy, and served aboard HMS Avenger. Avenger was one of four motor-ships laid down under Maritime Commission contract, by the Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. at Chester, Pennsylvania, and launched on 27 November 1940. In 1942 she was rebuilt from a US merchant ship, as the second of 38 converted C3 escort carriers turned over to Great Britain during the war. She was commissioned as an escort carrier on 2 March 1942 and served with Convoy PQ-18 (sinking one U-boat on the journey), before participating in Operation Torch (the invasion of North Africa). HMS Avenger was sunk by a German submarine as she was heading back from Africa to her home port Clyde on 15 November 1942. The explosion that sank her left only 12 survivors out of a total crew of 550 men. William was one of the men killed that day. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Liverpool Naval Memorial.

 

William Oliver George Bryan, Fourth Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. William was the son of John and Virginia Bryan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Lady Glanely, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 2 December 1940, Lady Glanely was on route from Vancouver via Panama and Bermuda to London carrying a cargo of wheat and timber, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-101 and sunk with the loss of 31 men. William was 23 years old when he died aboard her that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David Christopher Lynn Davies, Third Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. David was the son of Thomas Davies, and Margaret Davies, of Cardigan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Tymeric, a Glasgow registered cargo steamer. On 23 November 1940, she was on route from Hull for Buenos Aires, carrying a cargo of coal, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-123 and sunk with the loss of 78 lives. David was 24 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Evan Arthur Davies, Flight Lieutenant, 101537, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Evan was the son of Evan Jenkin and Catherine Davies, of Talfryn, Cardigan, and the husband of Elizabeth Lilian Davies, of Pembrey. He served as a Pilot with 50 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Avro Lancaster Mark I, based at RAF Skellingthorpe. Evan was killed when his Lancaster was shot down over France on 13 February 1943. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Gavres Communal Cemetery, France.

 

Irwin Arthur Davies, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. Irwin was the son of Evan and Hannah Davies, and the husband of Mary Edith Davies, of Cardigan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Newbury, a London registered steamer. On 15 September 1941, she was on route from Cardiff for Buenos Aires carrying a cargo of coal, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-94, and sunk with the loss of 45 lives. Irwin was 46 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Owen Davies, Bombardier, 799227, Royal Artillery. John was the son of Thomas and Mary Ann Davies, and the husband of Emily Mary Davies, of Cardigan. He served during the war with 407 Battery, 146 (The Pembroke Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. The battery served in the North African campaign, before taking part in the landings at Sicily and Salerno. It remained in Italy until after the armistice. John survived the war but died on 23 December 1946, aged 53. He is buried at Manordeifi (St. David) Churchyard. John does not seem to be commemorated in Cardigan.

 

Tim Davies. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

W. M. Davies. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

Dewi Owen Herbert Edwards, Lance Corporal, 3913787, South Wales Borderers. Dewi was the son of David and Katty Edwards, of Cardigan, and the husband of Martha Jane Edwards, of Mountain Ash, Glamorgan. He served with the 6th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which took part in the Burmese campaign. Dewi was killed at Sahmaw Chaung on 5 August 1944. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Taukkyan War Cemetery, Burma. The photograph is courtesy of Tony Beck.

Evan O. Evans. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

Howard Vaughan Evans, Paymaster Lieutenant Commander, Royal Navy. Howard was the son of the Reverend Thomas Lodwig Evans and Maria Jane Evans, of Cardigan. He served with the Royal Navy. Howard died on 21 March 1943, aged 42, and is buried at Hanwell Cemetery, Middlesex.

 

John Henry Howard Evans, Able Seaman, C/JX 168157, Royal Navy. John was the son of John Henry and Phoebe Elizabeth Evans, of Nythfa, Cardigan. He served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Jaguar, a J class destroyer. Jaguar participated in Operation Abstention in February 1941, and engaged the Italian destroyer Crispi, and took part in the Battle of Cape Matapan. On 26 March 1942, she was struck by two torpedoes fired by the German submarine U-652, and sank off Sidi Barrani with the loss of 190 of her crew. John was 23 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

Thomas Arthur Evans, First Electrician, Merchant Navy. Thomas was born on 2 October 1908, the son of Captain B. Evans and Kesiah Mary Evans, of 2, Windsor Terrace, Cardigan, and resided at Penaruchaf, Aberporth. He served as an electrician in the Merchant Navy, aboard the MV California Star, a London registered cargo vessel. Thomas was killed when California Star was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-515 on 4 March 1943. He was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

William Glyndwr Evans, Able Seaman, D/J 110359, Royal Navy. Glyn was the son of Henry Harries Evans and Hannah Eva Evans, of Cardigan, and the husband of Hannah Mary Evans, of Cilgerran. He served in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Scarborough, which was a Hastings class sloop, which had been launched in 1930. She saw active service during the Second World War, especially as a convoy escort in the North Atlantic. She survived the war, but William died aboard Scarborough on 4 June 1942. He was 42 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Richard Horace Fugle, Gunner, 774471, Royal Artillery. Richard was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth Fugle, of Cardigan. He served with 18 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment served in Burma equipped with the M7/Priest self propelled gun, and fought with the 14th Army across the Irrawaddy. Richard was killed in Burma on 18 February 1945. He was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar. The photograph is courtesy of Tony Beck.

John Islwyn George, Petty Officer Supply, D/MX 52755, Royal Navy. John was the son of David John and Margaret Ann George, of Maesteg, Glamorgan. He resided at St. Mary Street, Cardigan prior to the war. John served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Charybdis, a Dido Class cruiser. On 23 October 1943, Charybdis was part of a group which had intercepted the German blockade runner Münsterland off Ushant, Brittany, when the force was attacked at night by the German 4th Torpedo Boat Flotilla. Charybdis was torpedoed by the German torpedo boats T-23 and T-27, and sank with the loss of over 460 lives off the North Coast of Brittany. John is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Glanville Llewellyn Glover, Gunner, 878155, Royal Artillery. Glanville was born at Pontardawe in 1922. He married Annie Evans at Cardigan in 1941, before heading for Burma with 130 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. Glanville was killed in Burma on 30 December 1944, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

David T. Griffiths. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

Eric Griffiths. This man cannot be positively identified, but was probably the son of David William Griffiths and Mary Griffiths, of North Gate House, Priory Terrace, Cardigan.

 

David Henry Jenkins James, Leading Aircraftman, 1601530, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of David Phillip and Elizabeth James, of Mayola, Cardigan. He served with the Royal Air Force, and was killed in the crash of a Percival Proctor training aircraft on 26 July 1942. David was 33 years old, and is buried at Cardigan Cemetery.

 

Lloyd Jenkins. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

David Owen Jones, Second Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. David was born in Cardigan on 1 December 1896, and was raised by his grandmother Susan Jones at 3, Tivy Terrace, St. Dogmaels. He lived with his wife, Mrs M. A. Jones at 63, Pomery Street, Docks, Cardiff prior to the war and served aboard the London registered merchant steamer S.S. Llanashe. On 17 February 1943 Llanashe was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-182 south of Cape Saint Francis, Cape Colony, with the loss of 32 lives. David was 46 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Enoch Jones, Lieutenant, 103082V, South African Air Force. Enoch was the son of Tom and Hannah Jones, of Cardigan. He was educated at Cardigan County School and at Aberystwyth University. Enoch lectured at Leeds on Agriculture before proceeding to South Africa, where he became a pilot with 12 Squadron, South African Air Force. Enoch fought in the Battle of Crete, but was killed when his Douglas Boston was shot down in Libya on 25 June 1942. Enoch was 26 years old, and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

Griffith Gwynne Jones, Sailor, Merchant Navy. Griffith resided at Berwyn, St. Dogmaels, with his wife, Frances Matilda Jones. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Andoni, a London registered cargo vessel. Griffith lost his life at sea on 12 January 1941, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London        .

 

Philip John Gwyn Jones, Third Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Philip was born on 11 June 1916, the son of Thomas Jones and Sarah Jones (nee Richards), of Cross House, St. Dogmaels. He had married Esther A. Jones in 1940 and the couple had briefly lived at Camden Town, London. Philip served aboard the merchant steamer S.S. Thornliebank. On 29 November 1941 Thornliebank was en-route from Barry via Freetown for the Middle East when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-43 with the loss of 75 lives. Philip was 25 years old and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Horace Jones. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

Jackie Jones. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

Ronald James Jones, Able Seaman, D/JX 188034, Royal Navy. Ronald was the son of John and Eleanor Jones, of Newcastle Emlyn. Ronald was a pre-war regular in the Royal Navy, and served aboard HMS Edinburgh. Edinburgh served as escort for the North Atlantic Convoys. On 2 May 1945, HMS Edinburgh was escorting Convoy QP-11, carrying a cargo of £45 million in gold bullion, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-456. The money was a part payment by Stalin for War Materials. After a desperate attempt by her crew to save her, and a gallant battle against further German aerial and sea-borne attacks, the Edinburgh was scuttled and sank. Ronald was killed in action aboard her on 2 May 1942, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

William Edward Jones, Third Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. William was the son of David and Ina Jones, and the husband of Hannah Mary Jones, of Cardigan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS King Alfred, a Sunderland registered cargo steamer. On 4 August 1940, she was on route from St. Johns, Newfoundland for Methil, carrying a cargo of pit props, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-52, and sank with the loss of five lives. William was 52 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Cyril Ladd, B.Sc., Corporal, 1190954, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of John and Decima Pickstock Ladd, of Cardigan, and the husband of Margaret Ladd of Leicester. He served with the Royal Air Force in North Africa, attached to the Desert Air Force, which supported the 8th Army during its war against Rommel in North Africa. John was killed in Libya on 7 March 1943. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Tripoli War Cemetery, Libya.

 

Cecil Lewis. This man cannot be positively identified, but is possibly the man below:

 

Cecil Lewis, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. Cecil was the son of Thomas and Anne Lewis of Newport, and the husband of Harriet Lewis, of Endon, Staffordshire. He served in the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Stangarth (London). Built by Pickersgill, the ship was on a voyage from Sunderland to India when she was torpedoed on 16 March 1942. Cecil drowned that day as a result. He was 35 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Thomas Glendenning Harries Lewis, Pilot Officer, 131994, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of Lewis and Mary Elizabeth Lewis, of the Commercial Hotel, Cardigan. He had married prior to the war, and was the husband of Mary Elizabeth Lewis, of the Black Lion, Cardigan. Thomas served as an Air Bomber with 49 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. On the night of 23 May 1943, Thomas took off in Lancaster ED813, as part of an inexperienced crew, on their first mission, which was to bomb Dortmund. On the return mission the following morning, 24 May 1943, Thomas' Lancaster was shot down near Essen, killing Thomas and three other crewmen. The three survivors were taken prisoner. Thomas was 31 years old, and is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

William Eirwyn Llewellyn, Sailor, Merchant Navy. William was the son of William John and Addie Llewellyn, of St. Dogmaels. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Canadian Star, a London registered cargo vessel. on 18 March 1943, Canadian Star was attached to Convoy HX-229, when she was struck by two torpedoes from the German submarine U-221, and sank with the loss of 34 lives. William was 26 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Evans Llewelyn, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. John was the Husband of Margaret Elizabeth Llewelyn, of St. Dogmaels. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV British Security, a London registered tanker. On 20 May 191, British Security was on route from Curacao to Bowling in Convoy HX-126, carrying a cargo of benzene and kerosene when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-556, south of Cape Farewell. John was 45 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

William David Mathias, Ordinary Seaman, Merchant Navy. William was born in Cardigan in 1923. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Houston City. William became ill and died of typhus at a French Hospital in Africa on 3 December 1943 aged 20. He is not commemorated by the CWGC, so nothing further is known of him.

 

Griffith William Miles, Third Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Griffith was the son of Thomas Griffith Miles and Sophia Miles, and the husband of Anne Mildred Miles, of Cardigan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Grelhead, a London registered steamer. On 2 December 1941, Grelhead was on voyage from Spanish Morocco to Britain, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-562, and sank two miles off Morocco. Griffith was 56 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Andrew James Morgan, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Andrew was the son of Margaret Morgan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Treverbyn, a St. Ives registered tanker. On 21 October 1941, Treverbyn was on voyage from Narvik to Manchester with a cargo of iron ore, when she was sunk by a mine from the German submarine U-75, with the loss of 27 lives. Andrew was 23 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Thomas John Moss, Warrant Officer, 521717, Royal Air Force. Thomas was the son of Edwin and Edith Augusta Moss, of Pontypridd, and the husband of Megan Ann Moss (nee Ellis), of Cardigan. He served with 540 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was an elite unit, equipped with the De Havilland Mosquito. Thomas was killed when his Mosquito was lost on 3 May 1943. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Thomas is not commemorated at Cardigan.

 

Ben Owen. This man cannot be positively identified.

 

Martyn Owen, Third Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Martyn served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Lady Glanely, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 2 December 1940, Lady Glanely was on route from Vancouver via Panama and Bermuda to London carrying a cargo of wheat and timber, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-101 and sunk with the loss of 31 men. Martyn is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David Thomas Williams Phillips, Pilot Officer, 119811, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of Silwyn and Elizabeth T. Phillips, of Cardigan. He served as an Air Gunner with 206 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a Coastal Command Squadron, equipped with the Lockheed Hudson. David was killed when his aircraft was lost over Germany on 26 June 1942. He was 22 years old. The wreckage of the aircraft was discovered after the war, and David and two of his fellow crewmen, Payze and Wright, are buried at Kiel War Cemetery, Germany. The other two crewmembers survived the crash, and were taken POW. David is not commemorated at Cardigan.

 

Victor Irving Powell, Gunner, 4081131, Royal Artillery. Victor was the son of William and Maud Powell; husband of F.M. Beryl Powell, of Cardigan. He served with 311 Battery, 90 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. The battery took part in the North African campaign, and it was there that Victor was killed, on 20 April 1943, aged 27. He is buried at Medjez-El-Bab War Cemetery, Tunisia. Victor is not commemorated at Cardigan.

 

William Lawson Ewart Radford, Marine, PLY/X. 2721, Royal Marines. William was born at Bristol in 1921. He served with the Royal Marines, and married Dorothy M. Griffiths, of Hillside, Pilot Street, St. Dogmaels in 1942. Nothing more is presently known of him, but he died at Basingstoke on 15 June 1943, and is buried at St. Dogmael's (St. Thomas) Churchyard. Buried in the same grave is Christine Evans.

David Picton Rees, Third Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. David was the son of Edwin and Esther Rees, and the husband of Violet Eurhonwen Rees, of Cardigan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV British Resource, a London registered tanker. On 14 March 1942, she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-124 north of Bermuda, caught fire and sank, with the loss of 45 lives. David was 27 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Brinley Arthur Sharpe, Steward, Merchant Navy. Brinley was the son of Frederick Arthur and Susan Ann Sharpe, of 1, High Street, Cardigan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Lady Glanely, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 2 December 1940, Lady Glanely was on route from Vancouver via Panama and Bermuda to London carrying a cargo of wheat and timber, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-101 and sunk with the loss of 31 men. Brinley was 20 years old when he died aboard her that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Two of his brothers also fell.

Ernest Victor Sharpe, Leading Aircraftman, Royal Air Force. Ernest was the son of Frederick Arthur and Susan Ann Sharpe, of 1, High Street, Cardigan. He served during the war as a Leading Aircraftman with the Royal Air Force. Ernest died of the effects of his service on 12 March 1946, aged 23 and is buried at Cardigan Cemetery. Ernest is not commemorated by the CWGC. Two of his brothers also fell.

 

Gwladgwyn John Sharpe, (Jackie), Flight Sergeant, 542001, Royal Air Force. Jackie was the son of Frederick Arthur and Susan Ann Sharpe, of 1, High Street, Cardigan. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 142 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Jackie was killed when his Wellington was lost during a bombing raid on Emden on 20 January 1942. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Two of his brothers also fell.

Charles Gwyn Smith, Fourth Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Charles was born on 7 August 1920, the son of Sarah Smith, of 16, Pendre, Cardigan. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Empire Oil, a Middlesbrough registered tanker. On 11 September 1942, Empire Oil was on route from Swansea via Milford Haven to New York in ballast, with Convoy ON-127, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-659, which stopped the tanker. On 13 September 1942, the drifting, and helpless, tanker was sunk by the German submarine U-584. Charles was 22 years old when he was killed that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Reginald Arthur Squibbs, Squadron Leader, 121396, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Reginald was the son of Harold Edwin and Ada Lucella Polly Squibbs, of Cardigan, and the husband of Joan Kathleen Squibbs, of Cardigan. He served as a Pilot with 619 Squadron, Royal Air Force, a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. Early in the morning of 12 September 1944, Reginald was flying Lancaster Mk.I, Serial LM209, PG-H, when it was brought down by German night-fighters, and crashed into a wood near Darmstadt airfield. The wreckage lay undiscovered until 10 May 1947, when the authorities examined a large crater and recovered the remains of the crew. Reginald was 35 years old, and is buried alongside his crew at Durnbach War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Desmond David Patrick Thomas, Sergeant, 929865, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Desmond was the son of David William Charles and Eleanor May Stephens Thomas, of Pantgwyn, Cardiganshire. He served as a Pilot with 15 OTU, Royal Air Force, and was serving at Malta. On 12 July 1941, Desmond was aboard Wellington I.C., Serial Z8775, which crashed upon take off from Luqa. All the men aboard were killed. Desmond was 19 years old, and is buried at Malta (Capuccini) Naval Cemetery. There is a memorial chalice to Desmond inside St. Mary's Church.

Johnnie Thomas, Second Engineer Officer, Trinity House Service. Johnnie was the son of John and Elizabeth Thomas, of 7, Northgate Terrace, Cardigan. He served with the Trinity House Service aboard the lighthouse tender S.S. Argus. On 12 November 1940 Argus was in the Thames Estuary when she struck a mine and sank with the loss of all but one of her crew. Johnnie was 39 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Hettie Annie Tudor, Sister, 236473, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Hettie was the daughter of Charles Richard and Sarah Ann Tudor, of Cardigan. She served as a Nurse with Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. On 26 November 1942, Hettie was aboard the SS Ceramic, which left Liverpool in convoy ON-149. Early in the morning of 7 November 1942, Ceramic was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-515. A few minutes later two more torpedoes struck the engine room below the waterline. The Ceramic stayed afloat and three hours later U-515 hit the ship with two more torpedoes, which broke her in two and she sank immediately. Aboard Ceramic were 264 crew members, 14 gunners, 244 military and naval passengers (mostly nurses of the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service) and 133 passengers, among them 12 children. There were no survivors. Hettie is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey.

Daniel Gwilym Williams, Chief Engineer, Merchant Navy. Daniel was the Husband of Helena Mary Williams, of St. Dogmaels. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Leo Dawson, a Newcastle-on-Tyne registered cargo ship. On 29 January 1940, Leo Dawson was on route carrying iron ore from Narvik for Immingham, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-37, with the loss of all her crew. Daniel was 50 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Hugh Mostyn James Williams, Lieutenant, 222520, Royal Artillery. Hugh was from Craig-y-Nos, Cardigan. He served with 80 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. The Regiment took part in the North African campaign, and the subsequent invasion of Italy. Hugh was killed in Italy on 8 September 1944, and is buried at Gradara War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Vivian Jones Williams, Leading Aircraftman, 930087, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Vivian served in the Royal Air Force, and was based in Egypt with the Desert Air Force, which had been formed to support the 8th Army in its operations against Rommel. Vivian died on 27 March 1942, and is buried at Heliopolis War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Stanley Louvaine Wyatt, Seventh Engineer, Merchant Navy. Stanley was born on 5 October 1914, the son of Albert George Wyatt and Mary Lavinia Wyatt, of Queen's Terrace, Cardigan. His father had died as a result of his service with the 4th Welsh on 27 October 1918. Stanley enlisted into the Merchant Navy in 1933 and trained as a Marine Engineer. He first served aboard the S.S. Antonio, and during WW2 was posted aboard the S.S. Hardwicke Grange. He was reported as lost at sea on 20 October 1940, aged 26, and is not commemorated by the CWGC because his death was not due to military action. His mother Mary had lost her brother John Ernest Williams at sea during WW1.

World War Two Polish Burial

 

Jan Motylak, Korporal, Polish Forces. Jan was born in Poland in 1900 and came to Britain with the Polish Forces following the German Blitzkreig. He served with the 11th Baon, S.K. which was situated at Oulton Park Camp, near Tarporley, Cheshire. The site of the camp is now a famous motor racing circuit. Jan died at Cardigan on 15 February 1947, aged 47, and is buried in Cardigan Cemetery.

Website News

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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