West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Henfynw War Memorial

Henfynyw is a small village just off the main coastal road between Cardigan and Aberaeron, about two miles south of Aberaeron. The Parish Church is thought to have been the birthplace of Saint David, and is dedicated to him. Within the Church is the Parish War Memorial, which commemorates the men of the parish who fell during both world wars. I do not presently have a photograph of this memorial, only a transcript of the names, so if anyone would like to send a photo in, it would be appreciated.

The Great War, 1914-1918

Albert Gordon Davies, MC, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Albert was born at Aberaeron in 1889, the son of John and Elizabeth Alban Davies, of Tanyfron Villa. He was commissioned into the 7th Battalion (Merioneth & Montgomery), Royal Welsh Fusiliers during 1916, but was subsequently attached to another battalion in France. Albert was probably wounded at Messines in 1917, during an action which led to him being awarded the Military Cross. His citation, which was published in the London Gazette of 25 August 1917, read; For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack in complete darkness, he pushed through our own barrage to the enemy line in order to restore the direction which his platoon had lost, afterwards leading them to their objective. He displayed magnificent gallantry throughout. Sadly Albert died of his wounds at Bailleul on 1 August 1917, aged 27. He is buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

Evan Evans, Private, 13513, Royal Fusiliers. Evan was born in 1894, the son of John and Ellen Evans, of The Rope and Anchor, Aberaeron. He enlisted at Cardigan into the army, and was posted to the 25th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. The battalion was raised in London by the Legion of Frontiersmen on 12 February 1915, and on 10 April embarked at Plymouth for East Africa, arriving at Mombasa on 4 May. It took part in fighting against the German Forces which occupied much of East Africa. Evan was wounded in Tanzania late in December 1916, and was hospitalised. He died of his wounds there on 6 January 1917, and is buried at Dar Es Salaam (Upanga Road) Cemetery, Tanzania. His brother, Thomas Morris Evans, also fell.

 

John Morgan Evans, Sergeant (Signaller), 562, South African Rifles. John was the son of John and Catherine Evans, of 1, Alban Square, Aberaeron. He probably lived in South Africa prior to the outbreak of war, as he served with the 2nd Battalion, South African Rifles. John died of fever during the campaign in German occupied East Africa on 6 June 1916. He was 34 years old, and is buried at Iringa Cemetery, Tanzania.

Thomas Morris Evans, Private, 52053, Cheshire Regiment. Thomas was born in 1897, the son of John and Ellen Evans, of The Rope and Anchor, Aberaeron. He lived in London prior to the war, and enlisted into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 1 April 1916. He was transferred to the 13th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment on 4 September 1916, which was attached to 74 Brigade, 25th Division. The Division had been in France since 26 September 1915, and were posted to the Vimy area, where they defended Vimy Ridge against a German attack in May 1916. They then moved to the Warloy area and attacked on 3 July near Thiepval, remaining on the Somme over the coming months. Thomas joined the battalion here, but within weeks of arriving in France he was killed in action on 21 October 1916. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. His brother Evan also fell.

James Jones, Private, 33269, Lancashire Fusiliers. James was born at Henfynyw. He enlisted at London into the Middlesex Regiment, and was transferred to the 18th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, which was attached to 104 Brigade, 35th Division. The Division moved to France in late January and early February 1916. It saw its first major action during the Battle of the Somme, at the Battle of Albert. James was killed in action on the Somme on 30 July 1916. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

John Harold Jones, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. John was born in 1889, the son of Benjamin C. Jones, and Mary Jones, of 16, Alban Square, Aberaeron. He was commissioned into the 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was in France attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division. John probably joined the battalion after the Somme Battles of 1916. In March 1917 they followed up the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and took part in Flanking Operations Round Bullecourt. The 7th were moved into a scene of incredible ferocity at Bullecourt, a strongly fortified village on the Hindenburg Line, and alongside the Australians played a major role in penetrating the village defences. Later in the year the Division moved to Ypres, and fought at the Battle of the Polygon Wood. They then took part in the Battle of Broodseinde, the Battle of Poelcapelle and the Second Battle of Passchendaele, suffering terrible losses during Third Ypres, especially in the fighting for Polygon Wood. John was killed at Polygon Wood on 1 October 1917. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Joseph Sydney Jones, Corporal, 546053, Royal Army Medical Corps. Joseph was the son of Jonathan B. Jones and Anne Jones, of Garth, Aberaeron. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Winifred Alice Jones, at 346, High Street, Lewisham, London. Joseph enlisted in London into the 2nd London Sanitary Company, Royal Army Medical Corps, and was attached to their 29th Sanitary Section. He served in Egypt during the war, and became ill there due to the terrible conditions. Joseph survived the war, but died of sickness in Kent on 5 April 1919, aged 33. He is buried at Lewisham (Ladywell) Cemetery, London. His brother, William Edgar Jones, died in France on 24 October 1918.

Owen John Jones, Private, 51595, Cheshire Regiment. Owen was the son of David and Mary Jones, of 9, Regent Street, Aberaeron. He was a sailor prior to the war, and enlisted at Cardiff on 27 February 1917 into the Cheshire Yeomanry, and was posted to France on 11 October 1917 to the 13th Cheshire Regiment. A week later Owen was posted to the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment. The battalion had been in France since August 1914 attached to 15 Brigade, 5th Division, and had fought in every major battle thereafter. Owen saw his first major action at the Battle of Polygon Wood, then in the later Battles of Broodseinde and Poelcappelle in September. Owen was killed at Ypres on 23 October 1917. He was just 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

The Reverend William Edgar Jones, Chaplain 4th Class, Army Chaplains' Department. William was the son of Jonathan B. Jones and Anne Jones, of Garth, Aberaeron. He served as a Chaplain with the Royal Army Chaplain’s Department, and had served in Salonika from 15 July 1917. Early in 1918, William was posted to the 9th Battalion, Yorkshire Regiment, which was attached to 74 Brigade, 25th Division. The Division had been in France since September 1915, and had fought at Loos. In 1916 it took part in the Somme Offensive, and in 1917 saw action at Third Ypres. The Division took part in heavy fighting during the German Spring Offensives of March and April 1918. After suffering heavy casualties, it was moved to the Aisne, where it saw further heavy fighting during the German offensive of 27 May. The core of the Division returned to England to rebuild, and returned to the front in September 1918, moving at first to St Riquier near Abbeville. Late in the month, it entrained for Fourth Army, coming under XIII Corps, and took part in the advance across Picardy, fighting at the Battle of Beaurevoir. They then fought during the remainder of the great offensive, at the Battle of Cambrai, the Pursuit to the Selle, the Battle of the Selle, and the Battle of the Sambre. William was wounded during the Battle of the Selle, and was evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station at Roisel, where he died of his wounds on 24 October 1918. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Roisel Communal Cemetery Extension, France. His brother, Joseph Sydney Jones, also fell.

David Lewis, Sapper, 182869, Royal Engineers. David was the son of John and Mary Lewis, of Green Garden, Ciliau-Aeron. He enlisted at Mountain Ash into the Royal Engineers, and was posted to the 19th Division Signals, Royal Engineers, which was attached to the 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boisselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozières and the Ancre in 1916. David died on the Somme on 30 December 1916, aged 26, and is buried at Hem British Cemetery, Somme, France.

Daniel Edwin Morgans, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. Daniel was born in 1899, the son of Edward and Margaret Morgans, of 16, Market Street, Aberaeron, and served with the Mercantile Marine. He drowned at sea on 23 January 1918, but is not commemorated by the CWGC, so nothing further is yet known.

Henry Loyn Pugh, Second Lieutenant, South Wales Borderers. Henry was born in 1888, the son of Thomas and Mary Pugh, of 7, Alban Square, Aberaeron. Educated at Llandovery prior to the war, Henry became a Councillor, and also a Scoutmaster at Aberaeron prior to his enlistment in the Inns of Court Regiment. He was commissioned into the 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers in October 1915. Henry was then attached to the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division, and he arrived in France on 29 August 1916. The Division was on the Somme, and in early September 1916, were in support of the Gloucester's and Welsh Regiment in the fighting for High Wood. Henry was wounded on 9 September 1916, and evacuated to 36 Casualty Clearing Station at Heilly. Sadly he died of his wounds on 11 September 1916. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L'Abbe, France.

World War Two, 1939-1945

Evan David Jenkins, Bombardier, 1489169, Royal Artillery. Evan was the son of Thomas and Jessie Jenkins, of Blaenlluest, Henfynw. He had moved to Clacton-on-Sea, Essex by the 1930's, and married Alice Maud Pickess on 26 December 1931. Evan enlisted into the army, and joined 48 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment sailed for the Far East on the day that Japan declared war, and stopped at Freetown and Durban before being diverted to Batavia, Java, due to the siege of Singapore. Evan was killed in Malaya on 6 December 1942, aged 36, and is buried in Labuan War Cemetery, Malaya. Evan does not appear to be commemorated anywhere locally. The photograph of his grave is courtesy of Tony Beck.

Gwilym Aeron Jones, Cook Steward, Merchant Navy. Gwilym was the son of William and Martha Jones, of Ffos-Y-Ffin, and the husband of Margaret Eleanor Jones, of Henfynyw. He was serving with the Merchant Navy at the outbreak of war, aboard the SS Stanholme, a London registered steamer. On 25 December 1939, Stanholme was sailing between Cardiff and Barry when she was torpedoed by a German submarine, and sank with the loss of 13 lives. Gwilym was 29 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Thomas William Lloyd, Trooper, 14497632, Royal Armoured Corps. Thomas was the son of John and Ann Lloyd, of 8, Water Street, Aberaeron. He served with the Royal Armoured Corps. Nothing further is yet known of Thomas’s service, but he died at Swansea on 25 January 1944, aged just 18. Thomas is buried at Henfynyw (St. David) Churchyard, Ceredigion.

Website News

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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