West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llandre War Memorial

Llandre (formerly known as Llanfihangel Genau'r Glyn- in English St Michaels at the Mouth of the Valley), lies five miles north of Aberystwyth, on the B4353 road from Rhydypennau to Borth. The men of the village who fell during the Great War are commemorated on a brass plaque, which is within Llanfihangel Genau'r Glyn Church, which also has the names of its Parishioners who served and returned. Inside the Church is also a stained glass window, dedicated to G. E. Morgan, one of the fallen. The photograph of the memorial is courtesy of Gil Jones.

The Great War, 1914-1918

John Pugh Hughes, Private, 15803, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of Thomas and Jane Hughes, of Tanllan, Llandre. He had served in the South African Campaign of 1899-1902, and after coming home married in 1906, living with his wife, Elizabeth Hughes, at 11, Pwll Carn Terrace, Blaengarw, Glam, where the couple raised their two children. John re-enlisted at the outbreak of war, joining the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozières and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved north to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines. John was killed at Messines on 1 August 1917, whilst 58 Brigade was consolidating the line near Junction Buildings road. He was 37 years old, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

Thomas Llewellyn James, Rifleman, A/204144, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Kate James, of 28, Museum Street, London. The family was from Llandre, and had returned there at some time prior to the war. Thomas enlisted at Whitehall into the army. He was posted to France at some time after 1916, joining the 18th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, which was attached to 122 Brigade, 41st Division. The division moved to the Italian front after taking part in the Third Battle of Ypres, but was recalled to France following the German offensive of 21 March 1918. Thomas was killed in action during the divisions advance in Flanders on 14 October 1918, aged 19. He is buried in Dadizeele New British Cemetery, Belgium. Thomas does not appear to be commemorated locally.       

Sam Jones, Private, 241872, Welsh Regiment. Sam was the son of David and Jane Jones, of Glanceiro, Llandre. He enlisted at Pontypridd into the army, and was posted to France at some time after 1916, joining the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. Sam probably joined the battalion after its move from the Somme to positions south of Ypres, and would have fought at the Battle of Messines Ridge during the summer of 1917. The division then took part in the Third Battle of Ypres, and it was during the time of this great battle that Sam was wounded. He died on 10 October 1917, aged 38, and is buried in Outtersteene Communal Cemetery Extension, Bailleul, France. Sam does not appear to be commemorated locally.

J. King, South Wales Borderers. The memorial states that this man resided at Tynpark, Llandre. He cannot presently be identified, as three men of that name died with the South Wales Borderers, none of whom have any obvious ties with the area.

David Lewis, Private, 437073, Canadian Infantry. David was born on 21 June 1893, the son of Benjamin Richard and Margaret Lewis, of Golm Fryn, Llandre. He emigrated to Canada at some time after 1911, and enlisted at Edmonton on 17 April 1915 into the Canadian Infantry. In February 1916 David arrived in France, joining the 14th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Royal Montreal Regiment), which was attached to the 3rd Canadian Brigade, 1st Canadian Division. He joined the battalion in the Ypres Salient, and in June 1916 saw his first major action during the Canadians famous action at the Battle of Mount Sorrel. The Canadians moved to the Somme in September 1916, and took over the line at Mouquet Farm from the Australians. David was killed during the Battle of Thiepval Ridge, when the 14th Battalion attacked Kenora Trench, near Mouquet Farm on 26 September 1916. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, France. Although being one of four patriotic brothers from Llandre who served during the war, David's name is somehow omitted from the Llandre Memorial.

William Benjamin Lewis, Lance Corporal, T/436675, Royal Army Service Corps. William was born in 1895, the son of Benjamin Richard and Margaret Lewis, of Golm Fryn, Llandre. He had originally served with the 3rd Battalion, London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), but was transferred to the MT Company, Royal Army Service Corps, presumably after becoming wounded. William survived the wear, but died at home on 4 March 1920, aged 25. He is buried at Penygarn Calvinistic Methodist Cemetery, Tirymynach. Although he was one of four patriotic brothers from Llandre who served during the war, William's name is somehow omitted from the Llandre Memorial.

Griffith Evans Morgan, Private, 26533, South Wales Borderers. Griffith was born in 1895, the son of James Richard and Anne Morgan, of Brynbwl Farm. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the army, and was posted to the 5th Battalion, South Wales Borderers at some time after 1916, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. In 1916 the Division the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozieres and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved North to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, and fought on the Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. In 1918 the Division was caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where it suffered terrible casualties, before being withdrawn to Messines to rebuild, however it was again caught up in heavy fighting, suffering terrible casualties before being moved to the Aisne to rest and rebuild again. Unfortunately the Germans launched a fresh offensive on the Aisne soon after, and Griffith was killed in action there on 7 June 1918. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Soissons Memorial, France and on a stained glass window within the Church.

Edwin Thomas Richards, Private, 31548, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Edwin was the son of John Edwin and Mary Richards, of Bronberllan, Llandre. He worked as a mason at Ystrad Rhondda prior to the war, and enlisted at Tonypandy on 1 September 1914 into the Dragoons. Edwin was posted to the 2nd Reserve Cavalry Regiment, and on 15 June 1915 was transferred to the 3rd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, before joining the 8th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 28 August at Gallipoli, where it was attached to 40 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division. Edwin joined the battalion in time to suffer its terrible ordeal as winter hit the Gallipoli Peninsula. On 15 October 1915 he was admitted at the 41st Field Ambulance suffering from dysentery, and was taken by Hospital Ship to Cairo. Edwin died of dysentery at the Citadel Hospital, Cairo on 4 November 1915. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

Constance Fane Roberts, Civilian, Army Remount Service. Constance was the daughter of Frederick Richard Roberts and Blanche Juliet Hope Roberts, of Brongenau, Llandre. Constance had been a nurse at Aberystwyth Red Cross Hospital early in the war, before working for the Army Remount Service at her mother's native Chester. She had fallen in love with an officer, Captain Brereton Ockleston Rigby, at the Remount Depot, and the couple had arranged to be married. On 9 October 1917, Constance and her fiancée were travelling in a motor car when it crashed into a tree which had fallen across the road near Chester, and Constance was killed instantly. She was 24 years old and was buried in Llandre. A brother, Frederick Rowland Roberts, served with the Canadian Infantry during the war.

Edward Williams, Private, M2/156574, Royal Army Service Corps. Edward was the son of William and Catherine Williams, of Tanybryn, Llanfihangel Geneur Glyn. He worked as a Chauffeur at Llandre prior to the war, and enlisted at Aberystwyth into the Army Service Corps. Edward became a Driver with the MT Company, Army Service Corps, and was on home service in Kent when he took ill with pneumonia. Edward died at Canterbury Military Hospital on 8 November 1918. He was 23 years old, and was brought home for burial at Llanfihangel Geneur Glyn (St. Michael) Churchyard Extension. Edward does not seem to be commemorated locally.

Robert Albert Joseph Wynne, Driver, 46184, Royal Field Artillery. Robert was born at Portsmouth, the son of David and Hannah Elizabeth Wynne. His parents were originally from Nantyglyn, Denbigh, but just after 1911 had moved to Poplar Cottage, Llanbadarn. Robert enlisted there into the Royal Field Artillery, and was posted to the 5th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the Lahore Division, which was attached to the Indian Corps. Robert joined the battery in France on 20 July 1915, where it was attached to the Lahore Division. When the Division left France, the brigade joined the Canadian Corps, serving with the Canadians on the Somme in the summer of 1916. By the summer of 1918 the battery had been attached to the Fourth Army, and took part in the great 100 days offensive which was to win the war. Robert was killed during the final stages of the war, on 2 November 1918. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Highland Cemetery, Le Cateau, France.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Robert Stanley Fukes, Corporal, 1475101, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Robert was the son of William and Mary Ann Fukes, of London. He married Lucy May Hand on 8 June 1933, and the couple lived at Fronfraith, near Llandre. Robert served with the Royal Air Force during the war. He died at Aberystwyth Hospital on 4 August 1944, aged 32, and is buried in Chester (Blacon) Cemetery, Cheshire. He does not appear to be commemorated locally.

 

Evan Lewis, MM, Civilian. Evan was the son of Benjamin and Margaret Lewis, of Colenfryn, Llandre. He had been awarded the Military Medal during the Great War, and afterwards moved with his wife Gwladys Lewis to 63, Park Road North, Acton, Middlesex. Evan was killed at home during an air raid on 19 May 1943. He was 51 years old. Evan does not seem to be commemorated at Llandre.

 

Richard Owen, Civilian. Richard was the son of William and Eliza J. Owen, of Penywern Farm, Llandre. He lived with his wife Elizabeth Owen at 11, Ashmere Grove, Lambeth prior to the war. Richard was badly wounded during an air raid on 30 September 1940, and died that same day at King's College Hospital, aged 57. Richard does not seem to be commemorated at Llandre.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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