West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llangrannog War Memorial

Llangrannog is situated on the coast, seven miles south of New Quay, in the Hawen Valley. It is an ancient settlement, with the earliest part of the village and the Church, dedicated to St. Caranog, lying in the upper segment of the valley. The village became a thriving port in the earliest 19th Century, but is now more widely known as a popular tourist destination. The men of the village who fell during the Great War are commemorated on a marble plaque at St. Caranog's Church, whilst the men who fell during the Second World War are commemorated on a separate marble plaque. The Pulpit is dedicated to E.D.O. Jones, of Tregregin Farm. There is also another memorial, which used to be at Bancyfelin Chapel, which was moved into the Church when the Chapel was sold in 1995, in the form of a scroll which commemorates its members who served during the war. These men are also commemorated on this page.

 

The Great War, 1914-1918

Karl D. Anderson, Mercantile Marine. Karl was from Christiana, Norway, and served aboard the SS Nor of Bergen. The ship was torpedoed by the German submarine UB-65 on 14 December 1917, whilst on route from Caen to Glasgow in ballast. Two men died during the sinking, and the survivors landed at Llangrannog in a lifeboat. Karl had sadly died in the boat the following day, and is buried at Llangrannog, where a memorial was erected to him by the inhabitants of the village.

Reginald Charles Hope Bewes, Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps. Reginald was born on 28 July 1890 at Cheltenham, the son of Reginald Anstis Bewes and Alice Anne Elizabeth Bewes (nee Hope), of 6, Lansdown Terrace, Cheltenham. He was educated at Clifton College and Sandhurst, prior to being commissioned into the Liverpool Regiment on 11 September 1913, obtaining his Pilot’s Licence, No. 523 on 17 June 1913. Reginald was attached from the Liverpool Regiment to the Royal Flying Corps on 5 August 1914 and joined 7 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps in France. On 23 May 1915, Reginald was flying an R.E.5. near Armentieres, when a shell burst near it. The wing buckled, and the aircraft fell to earth, killing Reginald and his Observer, Lieutenant F. H. Hyland. Both are buried at Vieux-Berquin Communal Cemetery, France.

David Jones Davies, Boatswain (Bosun), Mercantile Marine. David was the son of Daniel and Margaret Davies, and the husband of Elizabeth Davies (nee Davies), of Cranog Hall, Llangrannog. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Greavesash, a Newcastle registered merchant steamer. On 26 February 1918, she was 10 miles off Cape Barfleur, France, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine UB-74 and sunk, whilst on route from Le Havre for Barry Roads. David was 44 years old when he drowned that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

John Elias Davies, Second Officer, 72341, Mercantile Marine. John was the son of John and Mariah Davies, of Llainshed, Llangrannog, and the husband of Bessie Clarissa Davies, of Glenover, West Wellow, Romsey, Hants. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS South Western. On 17 March 1918, South Western was on voyage from Southampton to Saint Malo, when she was sunk by the German submarine UB-59, nine miles off St. Catherine's Point. John was 29 years old when he drowned that day. His body was washed ashore, and so John is buried at Étretat Churchyard Extension, France.

 

John Thomas Davies, Able Seaman, Mercantile Marine. John was the son of David and Anne Davies, of Cefn Ceiliog, Llangrannog. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Commonwealth. On 19 February 1918, she was on route from Algeria for Middlesbrough, with a cargo of iron ore, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UC-71, five miles off Flamborough Head. John was one of fourteen men who died during the sinking, and was aged 20. His body was recovered, and John is buried at Llangrannog (Capel-Y-Wig) Congregational Chapelyard.

 

Evan Owen Evans, Able Seaman, 825383, Mercantile Marine Reserve. Evan was the son of Daniel and Elizabeth Evans, of Frondeiniol, Llangrannog. He served with the Mercantile Marine Reserve, and was based at HMS Victory, the Royal Naval Barracks at Portsmouth. Evan died at Haslar Royal Naval Hospital on 12 September 1918, aged 18, and is buried at Llangrannog (St. Caranog) Churchyard.

Timothy Idwal Hope Evans, Captain, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Timothy was born at Llangrannog on 6 February 1889, the son of the Reverend John Hope Evans and Jeannette Elizabeth Hope-Evans, and had lived there until after 1911, when his parents moved to Siloa Villa, Mardy. He was educated at St. Andrew's College, Dundee, prior to joining the 13th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers in November 1914. He was commissioned on 20 March 1915, and was posted to the 19th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France during the first week of  June 1916, and moved to the front near Loos. By now Timothy had been promoted to Captain. Late in 1916, the Division moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division was one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. Timothy was killed in action at Bourlon Wood on 23 November 1917. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France. Timothy is not commemorated at Llangrannog.

David George Griffith, MC, Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. David was the son of George and Jane Griffiths, of Llangrannog. The family had moved to Baker's Farm, Ticehurst, Sussex during the war, but David had enlisted into the Royal Navy by around 1908. After completing 8 years at sea, David was commissioned into the Royal Artillery, and was posted to France, where he joined the 84th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 18th (Eastern) Division. David was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry during the German Spring Offensive of 21 March 1918. The citation was published in the London Gazette of 23 April 1918, and read; ' For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in charge of the battery while it was firing the final protective barrage. When the enemy shelled the position, exploding some ammunition and setting the camouflage of the gun-pit on fire he superintended the extinguishing of the fire and so saved the gun and ammunition. He did excellent work on several other occasions.' David was wounded during this action, and returned home, dying as a result of injuries suffered during the war, on 17 December 1918, aged 28. David is buried at Llangrannog (St. David) Churchyard. The Memorial Hall Memorial shows him as serving with the Royal Navy, but he had been in the army for a year when he died. David is not commemorated on the Llangrannog Memorial.

William Henry Webley Hope, CMG, Lieutenant-Colonel. Royal Garrison Artillery. William was the son of Rear Admiral Charles Webley Hope and Ellen Evelyn Elizabeth Hope. He married Florence Mary Hill in 1900, and the couple resided at 114, Sexham Gardens, South Kensington. William served throughout the Great War on Home Service, with the Royal Garrison Artillery. He died on 13 May 1919, aged 48, and is buried at Enfield (Hertfield Road) Cemetery, Middlesex. William is not commemorated on the Llangrannog Memorial, but is named on the Bancyfelin Memorial. Photograph courtesy of Geoffrey Gillon.

David Hughes Jones, Master, Mercantile Marine. David resided at Bodawen, Llangrannog. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Greldon. On 8 October 1917, Greldon was torpedoed off Ireland by the German submarine U-96, and sank with the loss of 28 lives, including David, who is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Evan Deiniol Owen Jones, Private, 49593, Lincolnshire Regiment. Evan was the son of Evan and Margaret Jones, of Trecregin Farm, Llangrannog. He enlisted at Knighton, Powys, into the Army Service Corps, and was posted to France late in 1917, joining the 4th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. The battalion was attached to 177 Brigade, 59th (2nd North Midland) Division, which landed in France in February 1917. The Division took part in the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917, and moved to Ypres later that year. Here, they fought at the Battle of the Menin Road and the Battle of Polygon Wood, during the Third Battle of Ypres. In November the Division moved south, and took part in the Battle of Cambrai. It was still in the area by March 1918 when the Germans launched their Offensive on the Somme, and the Division was caught up in the desperate fighting at the Battle of St Quentin, and the First Battle of Bapaume. The Division was then moved to Flanders to rebuild, but a fresh German Offensive was launched here during April 1918. Evan was killed in action in Flanders on 15 April 1918. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.

Evan Thomas Lewis, Private, 18422, South Wales Borderers. Evan was born at Rhydlewis, the son of Thomas and Anne Lewis. The family later resided at Brynsiriol, Prengwyn, Llandyssul. Evan enlisted at Aberystwyth into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to the 5th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It remained on the Somme that year, and in 1917 Division moved north to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, then the Third Battle of Ypres. In 1918 they were caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where they suffered terrible casualties, and fought at the Battle of Bapaume. They moved to Ypres, but were caught up in the German attack at Messines, and at Bailleul, and Kemmel. After suffering terribly again, they moved south to the quieter French sector to rebuild, but were caught up in the German offensive on the Aisne. Evan was killed in action here on 30 May 1918. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Marfaux British Cemetery, France.

William Morgan Lewis, First Mate, Mercantile Marine. William was the son of David and Betsy Lewis, of Waun Villa, Rhydlewis. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Snowdon, a London registered steamer. On 19 May 1918, Snowdon was on voyage from Cardiff to Milos with a cargo of coal, when she was sunk by the German submarine U-63, 84 miles off Malta, with the loss of two lives, both men of Llangrannog. William was 28 years old when he drowned that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Charles Herbert Ralph Montague, Gunner, 3125, Royal Field Artillery. Charles, known as Ralph, was born at Cannock in 1898, the son of Cyril Montague. The family had moved to Bryndewi, Llangrannog just prior to the war. Ralph enlisted at Carmarthen into the Royal Artillery, and was posted to France with the 73rd Battery, 5th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. The Battery moved to Ypres in the summer of 1917, where it supported the infantry offensive on Passchendaele Ridge. Ralph was killed in action at Ypres on 14 October 1917, and is buried at Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium. His brother Stanley also fell.

Stanley Montague, Private, 12365, Cavalry. Stanley was born at King's Heath, Birmingham in 1885, the son of Cyril Montague. The family had moved to Bryndewi, Llangrannog, just prior to the war, but had lived in West Wales since the turn of the century. Stanley enlisted into the Cavalry at Carmarthen in 1902, and had served with the 9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers in South Africa, prior to being discharged to the army reserve in 1910. Stanley rejoined the colours at the outbreak of war, and landed to France on 9 February 1915, rejoining the 9th Lancers. The regiment had fought at Mons, and the subsequent retreat to the Marne, where the German drive on Paris was halted. They moved to Ypres with the BEF, and fought their last action as Cavalry during the war at the First Battle of Ypres. The 9th Lancers remained in the salient over the winter, and Stanley joined up with them at Ypres. Stanley was killed in action at the Second Battle of Ypres, on 24 May 1915. He is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. His brother Charles also fell.

William Oliver, Private, 14079, Essex Regiment. William was from Stratford, Essex, and resided at Nantybach, Llangrannog prior to the war. He enlisted at Haverfordwest into the army, and was posted to the 9th Battalion, Essex Regiment, which was attached to 35 Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division. The Division landed at Boulogne on 31 May 1915, and took over the line at Ploegsteert Wood, and William joined the battalion here in August 1915. They then moved south and fought in the Battle of Loos, and the subsequent actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, and remained there until March 1916. By June they were in position at the Somme, and attacked Ovillers on 2 July. They fought at Pozieres and Le Transloy before being moved to the Arras area during October, 1916, where they fought in the March 1917 Battle of Arras, taking part in the First Battle of the Scarpe, and the Battle of Arleux. William was killed at Arleux on 3 May 1917, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

John Owen, First Mate, Mercantile Marine. John was born at Capel y Wig, Llangrannog, the son of Owen and Elizabeth Owen. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Ellen Owen (nee Williams), at Tan-Y-Castell, Cross Inn, Llandyssul. John served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Llongwen, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 18 July 1916, Llongwen was on voyage from Naples to Barry, when she was sunk by the German submarine U-39, 90 miles off Algiers, with the loss of 14 lives. John was 36 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

John Lewis Owen, Master, Mercantile Marine. John was the son of Thomas and Sarah Owen, of Wynebhwnt, Rhydlewis. He served with the Mercantile Marine as Master of the SS Snowdon, a London registered steamer. On 19 May 1918, Snowdon was on voyage from Cardiff to Milos with a cargo of coal, when she was sunk by the German submarine U-63, 84 miles off Malta, with the loss of two lives, both men of Llangrannog. John was 29 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

William James Royden, Private, 355114, King's Liverpool Regiment. William was the son of John and Elizabeth Royden, of Liverpool. He married Mary Ann Davies, of Newcastle Emlyn in 1919, after having been discharged from the army. Little else is known of William, but he died on 9 November 1920, aged 42, and is buried in Llangrannog (Capel-Y-Wig) Congregational Chapelyard. William does not appear to be commemorated locally.

 

Daniel Thomas, Second Mate, Mercantile Marine. Daniel was the son of John and Mary Jane Thomas (nee Roberts), of Arforfaur, Llangrannog. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Don Arturo, a London registered steamer. On 17 June 1917, Don Arturo was on route from Algiers for the Tees when she was torpedoed by German submarine UC-62, and sunk 90 miles off the Scilly Isles. Daniel was 26 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

John Elias Thomas, Private, 39726, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. John was born in Bolton, the son of Henry and Margaret Thomas. After his father’s death, the family moved back to Margaret’s native Llangrannog, and lived at Avondale. John enlisted into the Loyla North Lancashire Regiment on 29 February 1916, and was posted to France on 6 July 1918, joining the 13th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was on the Somme attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. John was killed in action during the divisions assault on Thiepval Ridge and Pozieres on 23 August 1918, aged 25. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France. John does not appear to be commemorated locally.

World War Two, 1939-1945

Robert Cecil Edwards, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Robert was the son of Edgar Cecil and Bertha Susannah Edwards, of Llangranog. He served with the Royal Navy at H.M.S. Saker II, which was the Royal Naval office at Washington DC. Robert died on active service on 28 November 1942, aged 24, and is commemorated on the Lee-on-Solent Memorial, Hampshire. Robert does not seem to be commemorated at Llangrannog.

 

Stephen James Evans, Guardsman, 2616689, Grenadier Guards. Stephen was the son of David John and Edith Evans, of Llangrannog. Little is currently known of him, but he died at home on 16 November 1946, aged 24, and is buried in Aberporth (St. Cynwyl) Churchyard. Stephen does not seem to be commemorated locally.

Daniel Owen Jones, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. Daniel resided at Clifton Hill, Llangrannog. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Justitia, a London registered steamer. On 22 November 1940, Justitia was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine, with the loss of 13 lives. Daniel was 58 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David Albert Vivian Jones, Steward, Merchant Navy. David was the son of Daniel and Nancy Jones, of Bodafon, Llangrannog. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Menin Ridge, a London registered cargo steamer. On 24 October 1939, Menin Ridge was en route from Djidjelli for Port Talbot with a cargo of iron ore, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-37, with the loss of 20 lives. David was 36 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He does not appear to be commemorated locally.

Evan Thomas Jones, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of John and Sarah Jones, of Llangranog. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the cargo steamer S.S. Boston. On 25 September 1942 Boston was in convoy from New Brunswick to Londonderry when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-216, with the loss of 63 of her crew of 65. Evan was 20 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Evan does not seem to be commemorated at Llangrannog.

 

Gwilym Teifi Jones, Sergeant, 1709001, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gwilym was the son of Henry and Mary Jones of Glanpwillafon, Cardigan. He resided at Lochtyn, Llangrannog prior to the war, and served with the Royal Air Force as a Flight Engineer, with 419 (Royal Canadian Air Force) Squadron, RAF. On 16 May 1944, Gwilym was Flight Engineer aboard Avro Lancaster KB701, which took off from Middleton St. George on a night bombing exercise. The aircraft crashed into high ground, killing all of her crew. Gwilym was 21 years old, and is buried at Glynarthen Congregational Chapelyard.

John Owen Jones, Master, Merchant Navy. John was born at Llangrannog on 12 August 1902, the son of Captain John Jones, Merchant Navy and Jane Jones. He was the husband of Muriel Stephen Jones, of Gwalior, Synod Inn. John joined the Merchant Navy on 31 March 1919 and by the outbreak of war was Master of the Falmouth registered steamer, SS Pendeen. He died of sickness at Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 16 December 1939. He was 37 years old, and is buried at Cementario Brittanico, Buenos Aires. John does not appear to be commemorated locally

James Thomas, Carpenter, Merchant Navy. James was the son of John and Anne Thomas, of Pengwern, Flintshire. Prior to the war he resided with his wife, Elizabeth Thomas, at Swn-y-Don, Llangrannog. James served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV British Vigilance, a London registered tanker. On 3 January 1943, she was on route from Curacao via Trinidad to Gibraltar in Convoy TM-1, with a cargo of petroleum, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-514, and abandoned with the loss of 27 lives. The stricken ship drifted for three weeks before being sunk by the German submarine U-105. James was 52 years old when he died on 3 January 1943, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Website News

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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