West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llanon War Memorial

Llanon (Llannon) lies on the A487 coastal road between Aberaeron and Aberystwyth, about five miles from Aberaeron. The name of the village is derived from its association with Non, the mother of Saint David, who tradition says lived in Llanon as a child. Many of the men from the village who died in both World Wars are commemorated on the memorials inside Llansantffraed Church, but as these memorials only commemorated the church members, in 1995, the local community council erected memorials inside Llanon Memorial Hall, which include several people not commemorated at Llansantffraed. The photographs of the memorials have been kindly provided by Mrs Irene Phillips.

 

The Great War, 1914-1918

David Davies, Private, 21306, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. David was the son of Martha Davies, of Morfa Uchaf, Llanon, and was the brother of Isaac Thomas Davies, of 3, Edward Terrace, Abertridwr. He enlisted at Llandudno at the outbreak of war into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and was posted to the 13th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which became attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 2 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. After two days of heavy hand to hand fighting within the wood, the Germans withdrew, and the battered Welshmen moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal, where it remained until launching its attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. The 15th Welsh remained in the line, and also took part in the Battle of Langemarck, before the entire Division was moved to positions near Armentieres over the winter. After the Germans launched their offensive on the Somme on 21 March 1918, the Division was moved back to the Somme, and took up positions north of Albert, around Aveluy Wood. David was wounded soon after, during operations to secure the Bouzincourt Ridge. He died of his wounds on 24 April 1918, aged 31, and is buried at Doullens Communal Cemetery Extension No. 1, France. Another brother, George, was taken prisoner in 1918, and returned safely to Llanon after the war.

Gwilym Mansel Pritchard Davies, Rifleman, A/204035, London Regiment. Gwilym was the only son of Thomas Rhys Davies and Mag Hopkins Davies, of The Tonn, Llanon. The family later moved to Bryn Derwen, Llangadock. Gwilym was educated at Bristol and Aberystwyth Universities, and served for a time as a Certificated teacher. He enlisted at Neath into the 12th Battalion (The Rangers), the London Regiment, which moved to France in December, 1914. On 8 February 1915 they joined 84 Brigade, 28th Division, and fought at Second Ypres. On 12 February 1916 they moved to become part of 168 Brigade, 56th Division, and fought at Gommecourt, and the Somme Battles of 1916. The Division followed the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line in March, 1917 before fighting at the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive. They then fought at Third Ypres and Cambrai, and on 31 January 1918 transferred to 175 Brigade, 58th Division and met the German Spring Offensive in the St. Quentin sector. The Division remained in the area, fighting during the Battles of Villers-Brettoneux and Amiens, when the German offensive was halted. Gwilym was wounded around this period, and Died of Wounds on 24 August 1918, aged 29. He is remembered on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France.

Isaac Evans Davies, Third Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Isaac was the son of John Elias Davies and Elizabeth Ann Davies (nee Evans), of Glanmorfa, Llanon. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Cliftondale, a Bristol registered cargo steamer. On 25 December 1917, Cliftondale was on route from Cardiff for Algiers, with a cargo of coal, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-35. Isaac was 21 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

John William Davies, Lance Corporal, 25471, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of John and Mary Morgan, of Cledan View, Llanon. He enlisted at Tonypandy into the 17th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was a bantam battalion, entitled, the 1st Glamorgans, and was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France during the first week of  June 1916, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. John was badly wounded at Bourlon Wood, and died on 25 November 1917, aged 21. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Daniel Edwin Edwards, Private, 16149, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Daniel was the son of Daniel and Mary Edwards, of Llwynon, Llanon. He enlisted at Abertridwr into the 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion landed in France on 27 September 1915 attached to 76 Brigade, joining the 3rd Division near Ypres. The battalion saw its first action in 1916 at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. The division then moved south to the Somme, and fought there at the Battle of Albert, and the Battle of Bazentin, where they captured Longueval. They then took part in the Battle of Delville Wood, where the 10th RWF gained two Victoria Crosses. Daniel was killed in action at Delville Wood on 20 July 1916, aged 25. He is buried in Delville Wood Cemetery, Longueval, France.

Nathaniel Edwards, Private, 782, Rhodesia Regiment. Nathaniel was the son of Daniel and Elizabeth Edwards, of Llwynon, Llanon. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Rhodesia Regiment. The regiment was formed in November 1914, and was sent to British East Africa, to take part in the campaign against German held territories. Nathaniel was possibly a former British soldier, who had settled in Rhodesia after the Boer War, and would have been a valued member of the regiment. He died in Tanzania on 5 February 1917, aged 38, and is buried in Morogoro Cemetery, Tanzania.

 

David James Evans, First Mate, Mercantile Marine. David was the son of Evan Evans and Anne Evans, of Llanon, and the husband of Jane Evans (nee Davies), of Omia House, Llanon. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Ballater, a Liverpool registered Merchant steamship. On 22 September 1917, she was on route from Bilbao to Middleborough with a cargo of Iron Ore, when she was torpedoed and sunk about seven miles off Devon by the German submarine UB-40, with the loss of 19 lives. David was 30 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Isaac David Evans, Driver, T4/145741, Royal Army Service Corps. Isaac was the son of Thomas and Anne Evans, of Bryn Ywen, Nebo, Llanon. He had worked at Ammanford prior to the war, but travelled to Aberystwyth to enlist on 17 November 1915 into the Army Service Corps. He was posted to the Middle East with the 39th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, which was attached to the 13th (Western) Division. The division was in Egypt after being evacuated from Gallipoli, and Isaac joined his new unit in time to take part in the offensive into Mesopotamia, and the attempt to relieve the besieged town of Kut. He died of dysentery on 24 April 1916, aged 25, and is buried in Amara War Cemetery, Iraq.

 

Jenkin Evans, Boatswain and Lamps, Mercantile Marine. Jenkin was the son of David and Anne Evans, of Priory House, Llanon. He served as Bosun aboard the S.S. Constantia, a London registered cargo steamer. On 8 May 1918 Constatia was en route from Newcastle to Rouen with a cargo of coal when she was torpedoed by the German submarine UB-21 and sank off South Cheek, Robin Hood’s Bay, with the loss of three lives. Jenkin was 48 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. I have recently been kindly informed by Sue Rees that Jenkin is buried in Llansantffraed Churchyard, and recent research has discovered that his body was brought ashore at Whitby, and sent home for burial by his family.

John David Evans, Private, 13859, Somerset Light Infantry. John was born at Llanon. He was the husband of Sarah Lizzie Evans, and the couple resided at Treorchy prior to the war. John was an army reservist. He rejoined the colours at the outbreak of war, and re-attested at Pentre into the 1st Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, which was in France attached to 11 Brigade, 4th Division. John joined the battalion at Ypres on 27 December 1914 as a reinforcement after the First Battle of Ypres. In 1915 the Division fought at the Second Battle of Ypres, and it was here that John was wounded. He died of his wounds on 27 April 1915, aged 28, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. As far as is known, John is not commemorated anywhere locally.

Charles Gutteridge, Private, Welsh Regiment. Charles lived at Rhydtorth Farm, and served with the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He is shown on the memorial as having been killed in France on 15 March 1915, aged 17. Only two men of the Welsh Regiment died that day, neither of which is Charles. His name does not in fact appear on the Welsh regiment casualty roll, so his actual fate is for now somewhat of a mystery.            

Walter Raymond Hicks, Private, 49758, Royal Fusiliers. Walter was the son of Ernest Walter and Mary Jane Hicks, of Albany House, Llanon. He resided at Highbury prior to the war, and enlisted at St Paul's Churchyard, London into the Royal Fusiliers. At some time in 1916, Walter was posted to the 8th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, which was attached to 36 Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division. By June 1916 the Division was in position at the Somme, and attacked Ovillers on 2 July. They fought at Pozieres and Le Transloy before being moved to the Arras area during October 1916, where they fought in the March 1917 Battle of Arras, taking part in the First Battle of the Scarpe, and the Battle of Arleux. Walter was in hospital at Étaples by the time of the Battle of Arras, and died there on 11 April 1917, aged 19. He is buried at Étaples Military Cemetery, France.

Daniel Harold Jenkins, Guardsman, 1427, Welsh Guards. Daniel was the son of David and Elizabeth Jenkins, of Millet Park, Llanon. He enlisted at Cardiff into the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards. The Regiment was raised by Royal Warrant of 26 February 1915, at White City, before landing at Le Havre on 18 August 1915, becoming attached to 3rd Guards Brigade, Guards Division. The Division saw its first major action during the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915, remaining in the area during the coming months, where they also fought in the subsequent Action of Hohenzollern Redoubt. In July 1916 the Division moved to the Somme, where they fought at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, and then at the Battle of Morval, capturing Lesboeufs Village. They remained here for the winter, and in March 1917 followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line. Later that year they moved north to Ypres, where they fought at the Battle of Pilkem Ridge, and then at the Battle of the Menin Road, Battle of Poelcapelle and the First Battle of Passchendaele. November saw them move south again, where they took part in the Battle of Cambrai. They remained in the area over the final winter of the war, and were stationed near Gouzeaucourt when the German Spring Offensive hit the area on 21 March 1918, at the Battle of St Quentin. Daniel was killed on the Somme on 27 May 1918. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Bienvillers Military Cemetery, France.

David Lewis Jenkins, Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. David was the son of Captain David Jenkins, and of Anne Jenkins, of Eukrateia, Llanon. He worked for the L and P Bank prior to being commissioned into the 5th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, but instead of joining them in Palestine, was posted to France on 14 May 1917, joining the 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 76 Brigade, 3rd Division. In May 1917 the Division was at Arras, and fought at the First and Second Battles of the Scarpe, and at the Battle of Arleux and the Third Battle of the Scarpe, where they captured Roeux. Again they moved, this time back to Ypres, where they fought in the Third Battle of Ypres, at the Battle of the Menin Road and the Battle of Polygon Wood. David was killed in action during the initial assault against the wood, on 26 September 1917. He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Jenkin David Jones, Private, 8485, 16th Queen's Lancers. Jenkin was born at Llanon in 1892, the son of Richard and Elizabeth Jones. The family had moved to 66, Thomas Street, Abertridwr by 1897, where Richard had gained work as a miner. Jenkin followed his father into the mines, but after the outbreak of war enlisted at Abertridwr into the 16th Queen’s Lancers. Jenkin joined the regiment in France at some time in 1916, where it was attached to the 3rd Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division. The Regiment didn’t take part in any major actions in 1916, but in 1917 took part in the Battle of Arras. Jenkin was killed at Arras on 11 April 1917, aged 24. He is buried in Tilloy British Cemetery, Tilloy-Les-Mofflaines, France. Jenkin does not appear to be commemorated locally.

Thomas Jones, First Mate, Mercantile Marine. Thomas was the son of the late David and Elizabeth Jones, of Llanon, and the husband of Mary Elizabeth Jones, of Gwalia House, Llanon. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Landonia, a London registered cargo steamer. On 21 April 1918, she was 27 miles off Strumble Head, in St Georges Channel, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-91, whilst on route from Bilboa for Glasgow with a cargo of pig iron. Thomas was among 21 men who died in the sinking that day. He was 48 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Stephen Lewis Morgan, Private, 63698, Royal Fusiliers. Stephen was the son of William and Mary Morgan, of Peris Terrace, Llanon. He resided in London prior to the war, and enlisted there into the 2nd Battalion, London Regiment. Stephen was posted to France early in 1916, and transferred to the 20th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (3rd Public Schools), which was attached to 19 Brigade, 33rd Division. He saw his first major action at the Battle of the Somme that year, and was killed during the Battle of the Ancre on 7 November 1916. Stephen was 36 years old, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Evan Edward Jones Morris, Sapper, 216899, Royal Engineers. Evan was the son of Catherine Morris, of Felinmore, Llanon. He served with the 158th Army Troops Company, Royal Engineers. Evan served in Italy, probably after moving there in 1917. He survived the war, but died in hospital at Cremona on 26 November 1918. Evan was 21 years old, and is buried at Cremona Town Cemetery, Italy.

John Alfred Evan Norton, Private, 458, 5th Royal Irish Lancers. John was born at Hemel Hempstead in 1883. He was the grandson of Mary Jones, of Peris Terrace, Llanon. John lived at Bethnel Green prior to the war, and enlisted at Croydon into the 5th Royal Irish Lancers. John landed in France with the regiment on 15 August 1914. The 5th Lancers formed part of the 3rd Cavalry Brigade, and took part in the Rearguard Action of Solesmes, near Mons, and the subsequent retreat to the Marne. The Lancers then took part in the Battle of the Aisne, before the BEF was moved to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines and the First Battle of Ypres. After wintering in Flanders the Lancers at The Battle of Neuve Chapelle in March 1915 and then in the Second Battle of Ypres. John was killed in action during the Battle of Bellewaarde Ridge, on 24 May 1915, He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

John Thornton, Private, 22493, Welsh Regiment. John was born in Rangoon in 1897. He was educated at Stockport, and had worked at Penlan, Llanon prior to enlisting at Aberystwyth into the Welsh Regiment in November 1914. John was posted to France on 17 February 1915, joining the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was in trenches at Neuve Chapelle attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. Over the coming weeks the division prepared for a planned offensive, the Battle of Aubers Ridge, which was launched on 9 May. The 2nd Welsh suffered heavy casualties during the attack, and John saw his first major action. He survived, but was killed there on 27 May 1915, during the later battle of Festubert. John was 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg L'Avoue, France.

World War Two, 1939-1945

Alan Longland Brigden, Warrant Officer, 565708, Royal Air Force. Alan was the son of Walter Longland Brigden and Patricia Brigden. He married Barbara Frances Cope at Chichester in 1939, and the couple moved to Llanon. Alan served with 172 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a Coastal Command unit, equipped with the Vickers Wellington. The aircraft were fitted with radar to enable them to hunt U-Boats. Alan was killed when his Wellington was lost on a mission on 8 September 1943. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Alan is not commemorated locally.

 

John Merfyn Davies, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1255308, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of John Evans Davies and Ellen Davies, of Ardgrange, Llanddeiniol. He served with 100 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the obsolete Vickers Vildebeest. The Squadron took part in the defence of Singapore in December 1941, but most of its personnel were captured by the Japanese after the surrender of the garrison. John was interred at Batoe-Doeah-Ambon, Dutch East Indies, and died there on 25 July 1944, aged 24. He is buried at Ambon War Cemetery, Indonesia. The photograph is courtesy of Tony Beck.

Simon Davies, Sailor, Merchant Navy. Simon was the son of Owen and Ann Davies, of Sunny Villa, Llanon. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Empire Amethyst, a Middlesbrough registered Steam Tanker, which had been built in 1941. On 13 April 1942, she was on route from New Orleans for Freetown carrying a cargo of 12,000 tons of oil, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-1564, blew up and sank with the loss of all her crew. Simon was 24 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Thomas Morgan Evans, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Thomas was the son of Morgan and Mary Evans, of Glanperis, Llanon. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Castlemoor, a London registered cargo steamer. On 16 February 1940, Castlemoor left Halifax, Nova Scotia, for the Tees. She was last seen by the SS Merchant Royal on 25 February 1940, and she was assumed to have been lost by enemy action. Thomas was 35 years old, and is commemorated alongside his fellow crewmen on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

William John George, Private, 3961466, Welch Regiment. William was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen George. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Welch Regiment. William married Anne Jane Williams, of Llanon, in 1942, before sailing to join his battalion in the Far East. During January 1945 the 2nd Welch were in action in Burma, crossing the Irrawaddy on the night of 28 January. The battalion saw heavy fighting over the coming fortnight, being continually under fire from the Japanese. William was killed in the Burmese jungle on 10 February 1945, aged 33. He is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar. William does not appear to be commemorated locally.

William Ewart Herbert, Master, Merchant Navy. William was the son of Evan and Jane Herbert, of 28, Alban Square, Aberaeron. He married Margaret Mary Richards, of Gwynlys, Llanon, in 1923. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Stangarth, a London registered cargo steamer. On the evening of 16 March 1942 Stangarth was on her maiden voyage, heading for Bombay with a mixed cargo of war material, when she was hit by one torpedo from the German submarine U-504, exploded and sank northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico. William was amongst 46 men lost in the sinking that day. He was 47 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Lewis Ivor Jenkins, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. Lewis was the son of John Daniel and Anne Elizabeth Jenkins, of Millet Park, Llanon. He married Annie Freada Evans, of Pennant, Llanon, in 1931. He served with the Royal Naval Reserve at H.M.S. Lucifer, the Royal Naval base at Swansea. Lewis died in Swansea on 8 December 1940, aged 41, and is buried in Pennant Calvinistic Methodist Chapelyard. Annie died in 1966.

Tom Ellis Jenkins, Second Officer, Merchant Navy. Tom was the son of Captain Rees Jenkins and Mary Anne Jenkins, of Glennydd, Llanon. He was a Master Mariner in the Merchant Navy, and served aboard the SS Empire Blanda, a London registered cargo steamer. On 18 February 1941, she was on route from Baltimore via Halifax for Grangemouth, carrying a cargo of steel, scrap and explosives, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-69 and sunk with the loss of 40 lives. Tom was 37 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Francis Ieuan Jones, Cadet, Merchant Navy. Francis was born on 19 February 1921, the son of James and Sarah Jones, of Fron Villa, Llanon. He was a cadet with the Merchant Navy, and served aboard the MV Erodona, a London Registered oil tanker. On 15 March 1941, Erodona was in Convoy crossing the Atlantic when she was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-110. The ship managed to limp back to port, but Francis was among 36 men killed during the explosion of the torpedo that day. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Ceredig Jones, Sergeant, 1386043, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of John and Ellen Jones, of Parc, Nebo, Llanon. He served as an Observer with 158 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a bomber squadron, equipped with the Halifax Mk II. John was the observer aboard Halifax DT795 which left RAF Lissett on the night of 3 April 1943, bound for Essen. After crossing the Dutch coast, the Halifax was attacked and shot down by Unterofficer E. Heinzelmann, and crashed near Apeldoornskanaal Wapenveld, near Heerde. Three of the crew are buried at Amersfoort, while John, who was 31 years old, and three other crew have no grave. John is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. (Photo courtesy of Robin Hill).

Christopher David Lewis, Master, Merchant Navy. Christopher was the son of Owen and Sarah Peers Lewis, and the husband of Belva Margaret Williams Lewis, of The Mount, Llanon. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Stanburn, a London registered cargo steamer. On 29 January 1940, Stanburn was off Flamborough Head, Scarborough when she was bombed and sunk by German aircraft. There were also reports of machine gun fire on the survivors in the ships lifeboats. All but three of her crew were killed in the attack that day. The bodies of four of the crew were washed ashore some time afterwards, one of which was identified as that of Christopher. He was 40 years old, and is buried at Llansantffraid (St. Bridget) Churchyard. His nephew, David, went down with the ship.

 

David Merville Lewis, Ordinary Seaman, Merchant Navy. David was the son of Evan Lewis, and of S. M. Lewis, of Henffordd Fach, Nebo, Llanon. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Stanburn, a London registered cargo steamer, which was commanded by his uncle, Christopher. On 29 January 1940, Stanburn was off Flamborough Head, Scarborough when she was bombed and sunk by German aircraft. There were also reports of machine gun fire on the survivors in the ships lifeboats. All but three of her crew were killed in the attack that day. David was 20 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His uncle Christopher’s, body was recovered.

Elizabeth Lee Lewis, Civilian. Elizabeth was the daughter of Evan and Margaret Lewis, of Allthoyd Farm, Llanon. Elizabeth and her two sisters kept the Whitehall Inn until 1928, when they moved 80, Nestles Avenue, Hayes, London. Elizabeth worked at the H.M.V. Gramophone Factory, which had been converted into a factory which helped create the first airborne radar sets. She was killed when an air raid shelter in the factory was directly hit by a V1 flying bomb on 7 July 1944, killing 37 people. Elizabeth was 52 years old, and is buried in Rhiwbwys Chapel Cemetery. She is also commemorated on a memorial to the victims in Cherry Lane Cemetery, London.

 

Ivor Caradoc Lewis, Private, 5507363, Hampshire Regiment. Ivor was born on 23 May 1913, the son of Henry and Mary Lewis, of Brynamlwg, Llanon. He served with the 2/4th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment, which had sailed for North Africa in 1942 to take part in Operation Torch, as part of the 46th Division. On 9 September 1943 the division landed at Salerno, and took part in the drive through Italy. Ivor was killed in Italy on 22 November 1944, aged 31, and is buried at Cesena War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Evan Iorwerth Rosser Morgan, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of David Thomas Morgan and Margaretta Jane Morgan, of Dauntless, Llanon. He married Gladys Lilian Gutteridge, of Poplar, London in 1934. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV San Emiliano, a London registered motor tanker. On 9 August 1942, she was 450 miles west of Trinidad, carrying a cargo of Aviation spirit, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-155, with the loss of 39 lives. Evan was 39 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

William James Morgan, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. William was the son of William and Mary Morgan, of Peris Terrace, Llanon. He was a Master Mariner, and served aboard the S.S. Canford Chine, a Swansea registered cargo steamer. The ship had been part of Convoy OG-52 until 8 February 1941, but had been struggling to keep up, and was never seen again. She was in fact sunk by the German submarine U-52 two days later, and went down with all hands. William is officially recorded as having died on 8 February 1941, aged 52, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David Elwyn Owen, Sergeant (Air Bomber), 534934, Royal Air Force. David was the son of Lewis and Margaret Jane Owen, of Cledan, Llanon. He served with 90 Squadron, Royal Air Force, as an Air Bomber. The squadron was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Short Stirling. On the night of 27 August 1943 David took off from RAF Wratting Common aboard a Halifax Mk III, Serial EF439, which was part of a force sent to bomb a target in Nuremberg. For reasons unknown, on the following morning, 28 August 1943, the Halifax crashed at Hesselnberg, killing six of the crew. One man survived and was taken prisoner, while David and the rest of the crew were buried in Herzogenaurach. All six men have been subsequently re-interred in Durnbach War Cemetery, Germany. David was 25 years old, and is also commemorated on a family memorial at Goginan.

 

Evan William Sweeney, Baker, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of Robert and Anne Jane Sweeney, of Greenfield, Llanon. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Empire Endurance, a Middlesborough registered cargo steamer, which had been captured from the Germans at Norway in 1940. On 20 April 1941 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-73, southeast of Rockall, Scotland, with the loss of 66 lives. Evan was 27 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Evan William Sweeney, Baker, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of Robert and Anne Jane Sweeney, of Greenfield, Llanon. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Empire Endurance, a Middlesborough registered cargo steamer, which had been captured from the Germans at Norway in 1940. On 20 April 1941 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-73, southeast of Rockall, Scotland, with the loss of 66 lives. Evan was 27 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Daniel Vincent Thomas, Civilian. John was the son of Captain and Mrs Thomas, of Glenville, Llanon. He was badly wounded during an air raid on London around the end of January 1941, and died at St James Hospital, Battersea aged 24. John was buried at Llansantffraed Churchyard on 5 February 1941. He is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

John Lewis Williams, Sailor, Merchant Navy. John was the son of John and Catherine Williams, of Llanrhystud (late of Troedrhis, Llanon). He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. San Emiliano, a London registered tanker. On 29 April 1942 San Emiliano sailed from Swansea for Curucao. She loaded up with high octane fuel before beginning the return voyage via Freetown. On 9 August 1942 San Emiliano was struck by two torpedoes which had been fired by the German submarine U-155 and exploded with the loss of 40 of her crew of 48. John was 25 years old when he was killed in the explosion that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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