West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Milford Haven WW2 Memorial

Milford Haven is reportedly the finest natural deep water harbour in the country. The town of Milford Haven is still a busy fishing port, and is an important centre for oil and gas processing. The men of Milford who fell during both World Wars are commemorated on the Milford Haven War Memorial, which is located at Hamilton Terrace. Due to the sheer number of men from Milford who fell during both wars, I have split the details onto two pages, for WW1 and WW2. As well as the men named on the memorial, I have also taken the liberty to add men who were born or resided at Milford but are not commemorated there. To download a PDF sheet of this page with photographs inserted, please follow this link: Milford Haven WW2 War Memorial.

 

Milford Haven War Memorial, World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Anthony Clerke Adams, Pilot Officer (Pilot), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Anthony was the son of William Frederic Clerke Adams and Frances Adams, of Hakin, Milford Haven. He served as a Pilot with 21 Squadron, RAFVR, which was a bomber squadron, which converted from Blenheims to Mosquitos in 1943. The squadron was famous for carrying out precision bombing attacks, most notably on the Gestapo Headquarters in Denmark, and a carried out strategic bombing on railway lines and roads leading up to the Normandy invasion. In February 1945 the Squadron moved to France, and soon after Anthony was killed when he was shot down over Germany on 27 February 1945. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Hanover War Cemetery, Germany, alongside his Co-Pilot.

 

George Coleman Allen, Ordinary Seaman, D/JX399421, Royal Navy. George served with the Royal Navy, and died on 4 May 1945, aged 41. Little else is known of him, but he is buried at Cobh (St. Patrick's) Catholic Cemetery, Ireland. (This may not be the correct man, but no-one else matches the details).

 

George Patrick Allen, Chief Engineman, LT/X 363ET, Royal Naval Reserve. George was born at Milford on 16 March 1906. He served aboard HM Trawler Laertes, a Shakespearean class trawler, which had been launched in October 1940. She was completed as an anti submarine vessel in 1941 and joined the 1st M/S-A/S Group at Freetown as a convoy escort. George was killed when Laertes was torpedoed by U-201 off Freetown on 25 July 1942, aged 36. He is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Thomas George Andrew, Chief Engineman, LT/X 5991ES, Royal Naval Reserve. Thomas was the son of William Frederick and Mary Andrew, of Cardiff. He married Elizabeth Alice McCanch, of Milford Haven in 1933. He served in the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Waterfly. She was requisitioned in September 1939 and converted for minesweeping, based at Kirkwall for sweeping in Scapa Flow. In 1941 she transferred to Dover, to 46th M/S Group, and Thomas died aboard her when she was sunk by air attack off Dungenness, English Channel, on 17 September 1942. Thomas was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Alfred Walter Barrett Apter, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Alfred was the son of George and Alice Gertrude Apter. He served aboard MV Meridian, a Panama registered vessel, which had been seized from the Germans by the U.S. Army. Alfred drowned when Meridian was torpedoed and sunk by U-561 on 26 November 1941. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Thomas George Edward Apter, Able Seaman, D/SSX 26860, Royal Navy. Thomas was the son of George and Alice Gertrude Apter, of Milford Haven, and served aboard the destroyer HMS Fearless. Thomas was killed when Fearless was bombed and sank in the Mediterranean on 23 July 1941. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Dimmock William Barker, Able Seaman, D/JX 175659, Royal Navy. Dimmock was born in Milford Haven in 1917, the son of William Barker and Betsy Barker (nee Dove). His parents later moved to New Clee, Grimsby, Lincolnshire. He served aboard H.M.M.L.B. 5. This was a Landing Barge, which was used as a light support vessel during seaborne landings. Dimmock died on 7 August 1942, aged 25 and is buried at Dover (St. James') Cemetery.

 

Leonard Hubert Barnard, Serjeant, 837988, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Leonard was the son of William Frederick and Florence Barnard of Milford, and the husband of Margaret Barnard, of Neyland. He served with the 4th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Battalion had spent most of the war on home service, but landed in Normandy at the end of June 1944 as part of the reinforcing troops. During the coming weeks, the Welsh Division fought several actions during the break-out of the Normandy Beachhead, and Leonard was killed here on 19 July 1944. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Banneville-La-Campagne War Cemetery, France.

 

Leonard Herbert Bean, Second Hand, LT/JX 215858, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Leonard was the son of John James Bean and Agnes Bean, of Great Yarmouth. He married Olwen Maud Limbrick of Milford Haven in 1938. He served aboard HM Trawler Cobbers, and drowned when she was sunk by German bombers off Lowestoft on 3 March 1941. Leonard was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Albert James Beckett, Boom Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. Albert was born at Lowestoft on 25 October 1891, the son of James and Sarah Beckett. He lived with his wife Margaret Elizabeth Beckett at Milford Haven. He served aboard HM Boom Defence Vessel Chorley. Albert was drowned when Chorley foundered off Start Point on 25 April 1942. He was 50 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

 

Harry R. Ivor Bennett, Boatswain (Bosun), Fishing Fleet. Harry was the son of Harry Bennett and Eliza Bennett (nee Griffiths), of 9, Albion Street, Milford. He served aboard the Fishing Trawler Respondo, which was registered in West Hartlepool, but based at Milford. Harry was drowned when she was lost off Milford Haven on 11 September 1940. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Frederick George Blockwell, Lieutenant Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. Frederick was the son of William and Rhoda Blockwell, of Milford Haven. He was based in Norfolk with the Royal Naval Reserve, and married Evelyn Soanes, of Gorleston, Norfolk in 1940. He served aboard HM Trawler Tervani, which was requisitioned in October 1939 as an auxiliary patrol vessel. In 1941 she converted to a minesweeper. Frederick was killed when Tervani was sunk by the Italian Submarine Acciaio off Algiers on 7 February 1943. He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Arthur George Brown, Sapper, 14271135, Royal Engineers. Arthur was the son of Arthur and Elizabeth Brown, of Lowestoft. He married Phyllis Jane Hughes of Hakin, Milford Haven in 1927. He had served with the Royal Engineers during the war, and died on 17 December 1945, aged 42. Arthur is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. Arthur is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

William James Buck, Master at Arms, D/M 10529, Royal Navy. William was the husband of Matilda Lavinia Buck, of Milford Haven. He had served with the Royal Navy through both world wars, but died on 10 December 1946, while still in the service. He was 61 years old, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. William is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Robert Burder, Private, 3957370, the Dorsetshire Regiment. Robert was the son of James and Elizabeth Burder, of Lower Merrion Street, Pembroke. He married Hortensia Rancis Williams at Milford in 1937. Robert and served with the Welch Regiment, before being transferred to the 1st Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment. The battalion had served on Malta for much of the war, and had been brought back to Britain to take part in D-Day, landing on 6 June 1944 attached to the 50th (Northumbrian) Division. Over the coming weeks, the Dorsets took part in heavy fighting during the break-out from the beachhead, and it was during this fighting that Robert was killed on 30 July 1944. He was 34 years old, and is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, France.

 

Charles Henry Chelley, Driver, T/127692, Royal Army Service Corps. Charles was the son of Charles Henry and Ellen Ann Chelley, of Swansea. He married Hetty Arnold, of Swansea in 1936 and the couple moved to Milford Haven. Charles followed in his father's footsteps, and enlisted into the Royal Army Service Corps, and was in France with the B.E.F. when the Germans launched their Blitzkrieg on 10 May 1940. Charles was with the element of the B.E.F. which withdrew to Boulogne in the coming days, and he was killed there on 20 May 1940, aged 30. Charles is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France. He is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

William Roy Cherrington, Seaman, LT/X. 21521A, Royal Naval Reserve. William was the son of William Cherrington and Dora Cherrington (nee Davies), of Hakin, Milford Haven. He served in the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Botanic. William was killed at Dover on 15 September 1940, aged just 19, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. Botanic was later sunk by German aircraft in the North Sea on 18 February 1942.

 

Vivian Clarke, Paymaster Lieutenant-Commander, Royal Naval Reserve. Vivian was the son of William Henry and Lucy Maud Clarke, of Cardiff. He was a long serving officer with the Royal Navy, and married Elsa Dora Deckert, of Whitchurch in 1937. He served aboard HMS Peewit, which was an RNAS station near Angus in Scotland. Vivian was killed in a road accident on 16 March 1944, aged 32, and is buried at Cardiff (Cathays) Cemetery.

 

Ernest Warald Newlands Codd, Able Seaman, D/SSX 18007, Royal Navy. Ernest was the son of Ernest and Mary L. Codd of Bunkers Hill, Milford. He married Olwen Lilian Rose Ledner, of Milford Haven in 1938. Ernest served aboard the destroyer HMS Ardent. Ernest was killed when Ardent was sunk while escorting the aircraft carrier Illustrious back from Norway, while gallantly attempting a torpedo attack on the mighty German Battleship Scharnhorst on 8 June 1940. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

William Alfred Coe, Second Hand, Fishing Fleet. William was the son of Ben and Alice Coe, of Yarmouth. He married Ruby E. Ball, of Milford Haven in 1931. William served aboard the Steam Trawler Aberdeen, a Lowestoft registered trawler. William drowned when she was sunk by enemy aircraft in Cardigan Bay on 12 March 1941. He was 34 years old, and is buried at Grangegorman Military Cemetery, Ireland.

 

Albert Bertie Cross, Private, 4388538, Green Howards (Yorkshire Regiment). Albert was the son of Albert Bertie and Lilian Beatrice Cross, of Milford Haven. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Green Howards, which was attached to the Indian Army, for operations in the Far East. Albert died in India on 8 July 1940, aged 25, and is buried at Delhi War Cemetery, India. Albert is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Colin Davies, Corporal, 4209021, the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Colin was the son of William William George and Eliza Jane Davies, of Robert Street, Milford Haven. He married Barbara Yvonne Humphries, of Pope Hill, Haverfordwest in 1939. He served with the 7th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, part of the 53rd (Welsh) Division. Colin landed with the Division on Normandy at the end of June 1944, and fought through the break-out from the beachhead and through the drive into Belgium and Holland. He survived the Battle of the Bulge, but was killed during the advance into the Reichswald, Germany on 13 February 1945. Colin was 27 years old, and is buried at Rheinberg War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Edward Thomas William Davies, Fusilier, 14761466, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Edward was the son of William George and Gladys Mabel Davies, of Milford Haven, and served with the 4th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, part of the 53rd (Welsh) Division. Edward landed with the Division on Normandy at the end of June 1944, and fought through the break-out from the beachhead and through the drive into Belgium and Holland. He survived the Battle of the Bulge, but was killed during the advance into the Reichswald, Germany on 16 February 1945. He was just 18 years old, and is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery.

 

Harold Davies, Able Seaman, D/SSX 28076, Royal Navy. Harold was the son of John Henry and Eliza Davies, of Milford Haven. He served aboard H.M. Submarine Tetrarch. She was assigned to the Mediterranean late in 1940, and over the coming months sank several enemy merchant ships. Tetrach sailed from Malta on 26 October 1941 for a refit in Britain, but failed to arrive in Gibraltar by 2 November, and was declared overdue. She is presumed as having been lost in an Italian minefield off Capo Granditola, Sicily, Italy around 25 October 1941, although the date given by the CWGC is 2 November 1941. Harold was 21 years old when he was lost in Tetrarch, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon. He is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Thomas Henry Albert Davies, Leading Aircraftman, 974475, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of Albert and Beatrice Davies, of Milford Haven, and the husband of Edith Laura May Davies, of Hakin, Milford Haven. He served with the Royal Air Force, but little is presently known of his service. Thomas died in Pembrokeshire on 25 July 1943, aged 32, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. His widow Edith married Cecil Hawkins of Milford after the war and died in 1984. Thomas is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Thomas J. L. Davies, Private, 3971521, the Welch Regiment. The records of the Army Roll of Honour confirm that Thomas Davies was killed on 2 December 1942 while serving with the Welch Regiment. For some reason he is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Oddly though, on the same day, another local man of the same name was killed, and it turns out that it was the same man. Please see his entry below:

 

Thomas James Levi Davies, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Thomas was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Levi Davies, of Mathry. He was a Territorial soldier, serving with the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment, but also served with the Merchant Navy aboard S.S. Amarylis. She was a Panamanian Cargo Steamer of 4,328 tons built in 1918. On 2 December 1942, when on route from Aden for Durban she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-181, and sunk with the loss of 29 of her crew of 37. Thomas was among the dead. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Frederick James Dawes, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. Frederick was from 5, Wellington Road, Hakin, Milford Haven. He was Skipper of Trawler M85 Ely, and was drowned when she sank after colliding with H.M. Canadian Corvette Trillium on 14 January 1945. Frederick was 45 years old. Frederick is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, but is reportedly buried at Lowestoft cemetery, so his body must have been recovered from the sea.

 

John Edwin Devonald, Engineman, LT/KX 99905, Royal Naval Patrol Service. John was the son of Edwin Devonald and Martha Devonald (nee Griffiths), of Hayston Hall Cottage Johnston. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard H.M. Drifter Reed. She was a requisitioned minesweeper in 1939. On 7 November 1940 she was on patrol in the Thames Estuary when she struck a mine and sank. John was 25 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk. His brother William also fell. John is commemorated at Haverfordwest but his brother is not, and neither are commemorated at Milford.

 

William Allan Devonald, Engineman, LT/X 6063ES, Royal Naval Reserve (Patrol Service). William was the son of Edwin Devonald and Martha Devonald (nee Griffiths), of Hayston Hall Cottage Johnston. He married Gwendoline May Griffiths of Hakin in 1937. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard H.M. Trawler Gairsay. On 3 August 1944 Gairsay was on patrol off Normandy, when she was hit by a German explosive motor boat, and sunk with the loss of 29 lives. William was 27 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk. William not yet been found on any local memorial although his brother John Edwin Devonald, who also fell, is commemorated at Haverfordwest.

 

Arthur Ernest Richard Dow, Private, 14731002, Welch Regiment. Arthur was the son of Kezia Dow, of Hakin, Milford Haven, and served with the 2nd Battalion, Welch Regiment. The Battalion served with the 14th Army in Burma, against the Japanese, and it was in Burma that Arthur was killed on 20 May 1945. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Rangoon War Cemetery, Myanmar.

 

George Joseph Durkin, Ordinary Telegraphist, D/JX 578987, Royal Navy. George was the son of John Joseph Durkin and May Durkin (nee Robson), of Milford Haven. He served aboard the frigate HMS Nith. During June 1944 Nith was attached to the Naval force supporting the D-Day landings, and continued at work off the Normandy beaches throughout the month. On 24 June 1944 a German remote guided German JU88, which had been loaded with explosives, (coded Mistel) struck the side of Nith and exploded, killing nine men and wounding almost 30 others. George was one of the dead. He was aged just 17, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Edward Vernon Dyble, Deck Hand, Fishing Fleet. Edward was born in Yarmouth, the son of Edward James Dyble and Iris Elsie Dyble. The family later resided at Hakin, Milford Haven. He worked as a Deck Hand aboard the Fishing Vessel Charmouth, a Milford Haven trawler. On 14 November 1946 Charmouth was trawling off Cork, when she picked up a German sea mine in her nets. The mine exploded, sinking the doomed trawler. Edward was 19 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Edward is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Arthur Dyson, Mate, Fishing Fleet. Arthur was the son of William and Martha Dyson, of Crickmail Cottage, Bosherston. He worked as a fisherman at Milford prior to the war and married Frances Maria Mathias Smith in 1919, and the couple lived at Milford. Arthur served aboard SS Dandara, a Milford registered trawler. On 12 February 1941 Dandara was at sea when it was attacked by a German aircraft. Arthur fended off the attack using the ships Lewis Gun, but was hit by machine-gun fire and killed. He was 40 years old and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. His widow received a posthumous gallantry certificate from the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill: "By the King's orders the name of Arthur Dyson, steam trawler 'Dandara', was published in the London Gazette as commended for bravery in the fishing fleet. I am charged to record His Majesty's high appreciation for the services rendered."

 

Thomas Herd Eden, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Thomas was born on 11 February 1920, the son of John William Eden and Rosina Eden (nee Bevans), of Milford Haven. He served aboard MV Rio Bravo, a London registered vessel. Thomas was lost at sea through the torpedoing of his ship at Ostend Roads on 2 November 1944. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Gordon James Edwards, DFC, Pilot Officer, 177700, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gordon was the son of Bertram and Mary Jane Edwards, of Milford Haven. He served as Pilot with 405 Squadron, RAFVR. The Squadron was designated a Canadian Squadron, and was equipped with the Lancaster heavy bomber from mid 1943 onwards, when it was also selected to be a Pathfinder Squadron, one of the elite Squadrons of the RAF. Gordon had earned himself the Distinguished Flying Cross, which was listed in the London Gazette of 28 July 1944, although there is no citation to say why he was awarded it. He was killed when his Lancaster, serial PB527, crashed in the North Sea on 16 September 1944 during a bombing raid to Kiel. All of the crew perished. Gordon was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Out of the crew, one man is buried in Sønderho, one in Esbjerg and five have no known grave.

 

Stanley John Edwards, Fireman, Fishing Fleet. Stanley served aboard Trawler M85 Ely, and lived at 47, Robert Street, Milford Haven. He drowned when she collided with HM Corvette Trillium on 14 January 1945, and was 30 years old. Stanley is not commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial.

 

Ivor Ronald Evans, Able Seaman, D/J 114032, Royal Navy. Ivor was the son of George Henry and Elizabeth Ann Evans, of Milford Haven, and served aboard the destroyer HMS Matabele. On 17 January 1942 Matabele was forming part of the destroyer screen on Convoy PQ-8, from Iceland to Murmansk, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarineU-454. Ivor was aged 33 when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Sydney Eynon, Fireman, Fishing Fleet. Sydney lived at 82 Marble Hall Road, Milford. He served as a Fireman aboard the Hartlepool registered Fishing Vessel Respondo. She was lost with all hands off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland on 10 September 1940, presumably due to a German aircraft attack. Sydney was 45 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.   

 

Stanley Arthur Frederick Farmer, Sergeant (Pilot), 1337505, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Stanley was the son of Reginald Herman Farmer and Beatrice Alice Farmer (nee Mathias), of Hakin, Milford Haven. Stanley served as a Pilot with the Royal Air Force, and was posted to No 2 Flying Instructors School in Scotland. He was killed when flying aboard Miles Master II, Serial DL415 which crashed into a hill near Nathro Lodge, Craigendowie, Angusshire on 18 March 1943. Stanley was 20 years old and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

James John Vincent Fenech, Boy, Merchant Navy. James served as Boy aboard SS Sheafmead, a Newcastle-on-Tyne registered vessel. James drowned when Sheafmead was torpedoed without warning by U-37 on 27 May 1940. James was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Dennis Joseph Fitzpatrick, MM, Serjeant, 401023, Royal Armoured Corps. Dennis was born on 4 March 1906 at Weymouth, and enlisted into the Cavalry of the Line on 31 January 1927. After postings with the King's Dragoon Guards, 5th Irish Dragoon Guards, and the 15/19th Hussars, he was finally posted to the 11th Hussars in March 1938. He served with the regiment in Palestine from July to September 1938, for which service his General Service Medal was sent to his mother in October 1945. He continued his service with the 11th Hussars at the outbreak of war. Dennis fought through the North African, Italian and Western Europe Campaigns, and gained the Military Medal for gallantry in North Africa. The citation for his award read; ‘On April 7th, Sgt. Fitzpatrick was in charge of a mortar section mounted in a White Scout Car under command of an Armoured Car Troop Leader. Near Djedida he heard German voices and realised that the troop had been ambushed by a strong force hidden in the olive groves. He quickly warned the Troop Leader and almost at once the troop came under heavy fire from two 88mm guns only 400 yards away and many machine guns. The Troop Leader's car was knocked out and Sgt. Fitzpatrick, finding it impossible to turn round, ordered his men to dismount just before his own car was knocked out. For the next hour he led his men, encouraging them and crawling through the cornfields under intense fire and later pursued by infantry. Eventually he got them into safety and under cover of darkness the whole section returned to our lines. By his quick action and fine leadership he saved the lives of his men. Sgt. Fitzpatrick has served in the Western Desert since the outbreak of hostilities and at all times he has shown complete disregard for his personal safety. I recommend that he be awarded the Military Medal.’ Dennis then landed with the Regiment in Normandy on D-Day, and fought up though Northern France. through Belgium and into Holland. Dennis was taken captive on September 8, 1944, along with three other 2 troop members between St Nicholas and Kemseke, Holland, during a meeting with a German Mk IV Special Tank, but escaped from his captors, and returned to Britain. He returned to Germany in August 1945, but sadly on 8 September 1945, Dennis was fatally injured in a traffic accident only weeks after returning back to the regiment after escaping captivity. He was 39 years old, and is buried at Berlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery, Germany. His medals and battledress tunic were sold at auction in 2003.

 

Peter Flanagan, Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner), 903094, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Peter was born in Hendon in 1920, the son of John Charles and Winifred May Flanagan. His parents were from Milford, and had returned to west Wales by 1922. Peter served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 49 Squadron, RAFVR. The Squadron had been used for minelaying, but in May 1940 began raids on Germany. At 16.00 on the afternoon of 16 October 1940, orders were received detailing 12 aircraft for bombing, the main target being the submarine pens at Bordeaux. Take-off began at 19.00 at 5 minute intervals until all 12 aeroplanes were airborne. Four crews managed to complete successful sorties, despite some considerable resistance, but Peter was to lose his life on the return leg of the mission, when, desperately short of fuel, Hampden P2143, commanded by Flying Officer Charles Pitman, crashed near Andover due to a shortage of fuel, and all of the crew were sadly killed. Peter was amongst the dead that morning, on 17 October 1940. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Hubberston (St. David) Churchyard.

 

James Henry Forrest, Second Engineer Officer, Fishing Fleet. James was the husband of Martha Elizabeth Forrest, of 80 Marble Hall Road, Milford Haven. He was the Second Engineering Officer aboard the Fishing Vessel Craigewan, a Milford Haven registered Trawler. James was one of the ten crew of Craigewan who died when she was lost at sea on 12 October 1945. He was 60 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. James is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Ronald George Foster, Seaman, LT/X 21614A, Royal Naval Reserve. Ronald was the son of John Foster and Elizabeth Jane Foster (nee Whiley), of Milford Haven. He served in the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler St. Achilleus. She had been requisitioned in August 1939 and converted for anti-submarine duties, and joined the 12th A/S Group at Grimsby, and in 1940 the 11th A/S Group at Harwich. After the German invasion of France, the BEF retreated to Dunkirk, where the Royal Navy evacuated the battered remnants of the British Army in Operation Dynamo. Ronald was killed here when St. Achilleus struck a mine off Dunkirk on 1 June 1940. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

John Robert Freeman, Third Hand, Fishing Fleet. John was the son of Robert Freeman and Mary Jane Freeman (nee Llewellin), of Milford Haven. He served aboard the Fishing Trawler John Baptish, a Milford registered trawler. John was drowned on 10 September 1940 when John Baptish was lost with all hands. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

George Richard Gale, Chief Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. George was the son of James George and Margaret Ellen Gale, of Milford Haven. He married Elizabeth Ann Thomas of Hakin in 1918. He had served on minesweepers during WW1 and during WW2 served aboard HM Trawler Topaze, which had been purchased into the Royal Navy in November 1935 for anti-submarine duties, based at Portland. She took part in Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of the BEF from Dunkirk, in 1941. George was killed when she sunk after a collision with the battleship HMS Rodney off the Clyde on 20 April 1941. He was 45 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Percy Edwin Gammer, Engineman, LT/X. 595, Royal Naval Reserve. Percy was the son of Phillip and Helen Gammer, of Milford Haven. He married Edith Winifred Picton of Milford Haven in 1924. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard the minesweeping trawler HMS Eday. Percy died on 30 May 1944, aged 40, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. His brother-in-law David Picton also lost his life during the war.

 

Geoffrey Garrett, Corporal, 2136922, Royal Engineers. Geoffrey was the son of Richard Garrett and Annie Garrett (nee Rose), of Ael-y-Bryn, Hakin, Milford Haven. He served with the Royal Engineers in Mesopotamia. Little else is known of him, but he died in Mesopotamia on 14 August 1942 aged 29, and is buried at Basra War Cemetery, Iraq. He was a qualified architect.

 

Albert Edward Gillard, Able Seaman, C/SR.67717, Royal Navy. Albert was the son of John Henry Gillard and Mary Gillard (nee Theaker). He served aboard the boom defence vessel, HMS Barsound. He died in Scotland on 1 December 1941, aged 23, and is buried at Sandwick Cemetery, Ross and Cromarty.

 

Archibald Glenton, Corporal, 7887997, Royal Armoured Corps. Archibald was the son of Joseph Glenton and Adelaide Glenton (nee Hutchison), of Milford Haven. He served with the 1st Royal Tank Regiment. Archibald landed on Normandy on 7 June 1944, and fought until his death on 26 September 1944, during the drive through Holland. Archibald was 24 years old, and is buried at Valkenswaard War Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

William George Goddard, Battery Quartermaster Serjeant, 1424537, Royal Artillery. William was the son of William George and Margaret Goddard. He married Edith Rose Jenkins of Barley Moor, Milford Haven in 1931. He served with 5 Searchlight Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was based at Singapore, and formed part of the defensive screen around the colony. When Singapore surrendered to the Japanese on 15 February 1942, William became one of thousands of Allied servicemen taken into captivity. He was sent to Thailand in October 1942. William died at Tha Sao Work Camp of dysentery on 30 June 1943, and was buried in Tha Sao No. 1 (St. George's) Cemetery. His grave was relocated to Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, Thailand after the war. Edith died at Milford in 1967. William is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Robert Cyril Goldspink, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. Robert was born on 24 August 1889, the son of Cyril and Ellen Goldspink, of 1 The Hollies, London Road, South Lowestoft. He had served with the Royal Navy during the Great War, and by the outbreak of WW2 lived at 45, Robert Street, Milford and was Skipper of the Trawler Loch Awe. Robert was drowned along with his crew when Loch Awe went missing after leaving Milford on 28 February 1943. He was 54 years old. As Loch Awe is not regarded as a war loss, is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

 

William Clifford John Gough, Second Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. William was the son of James Henry Gough and Sarah Gough (nee Nicholas), of 35 Dewsland Street, Milford Haven. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Parracombe, a London registered cargo steamer. On 2 May 1941, Parracombe was on passage for Leith from Malta when she struck a mine and sunk, nine miles off Cape Bon. William was 40 years old when he died in the sinking, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. William is not commemorated on the Milford Memorial, but is named on his parents grave at Milford.

 

Wilfred Ambrose Griffiths, Sergeant (Pilot), 1316333, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Wilfred was the son of Martha Jane Griffiths (nee Lewis), and the stepson of John Peel, of Hakin, Milford Haven. He served as Pilot with 102 Squadron, RAFVR, which was a Coastal Command Squadron, equipped with the Halifax, and were based at RAF Pocklington from August 1942 onwards. Wilfred was killed whilst his Halifax DT747 was shot down at Hjertingvej, Esbjerg, Denmark on 21 April 1943. He was 20 years old, and is buried alongside his crewmen at Esbjerg (Fourfelt) Cemetery, Denmark.

 

Charles William Gwilliam, Chief Engineer, Fishing Fleet. Charles was born on 6 January 1894, the son of Richard Gwilliam and Martha Gwilliam (nee Absalom), of St. Ishmaels. He married Edith Julia Edwards of Milford Haven in 1918. He was Chief Engineer aboard the Fishing Vessel Craigewan, a Milford Haven registered Trawler. Charles was one of the ten crew of Craigewan who died when she was lost at sea on 12 October 1945. He was 50 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Charles is not named on the Milford Memorial. His nephew John Gwilliam was also lost at sea.

 

John Gwilliam, Chief Engineer, Fishing Fleet. John was born in St. Ishmaels in 1906. He married Mabel Emma Wigg of Milford Haven in 1935. He was Chief Engineer aboard the Trawler Loch Awe, and was 37 years old when she was lost with all hands after leaving Milford on 28 February 1943. John is commemorated on a family gravestone at Milford Haven Cemetery, but as Loch Awe is not regarded as a war loss, is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. His uncle Charles William Gwilliam was also lost at sea.

 

William John Gwilliam, Engineman, LT/KX 99971, Royal Naval Patrol Service. William was the son of Thomas and Alice Gwilliam, of St. Ishmaels. He married Beatrice Elizabeth Lewis of Milford Haven in 1933. He served aboard HM Trawler Tervani. She had been requisitioned in October 1939 as an auxiliary patrol vessel, and in 1941 was converted to a minesweeper. William was killed when she was sunk by the Italian Submarine Acciaio off Algiers on 7 February 1943. He was 35 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Wilfred George Hall, Lance Bombardier, 1796106, Royal Artillery. Wilfred was the son of George Thomas Hall and Emily Hennah (nee Hall). He served with 37 Coast Observer Detachment, Royal Artillery, which was stationed at Singapore. He was captured during the surrender of Singapore during February 1942, and survived two years in captivity before dying on 12 September 1944. Wilfred was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial.

 

James Derrick Harness, Civilian. James was born in the Summer of 1923, the son of Percy Harness and Violet Harness (nee Jones), of Hakin, Milford Haven. Percy was a civilian, and while awaiting his call up papers to join the RAF, was serving on a harbour service launch in Milford. On 10 August 1942, James was at work at Milford Docks, when a Royal Naval rating, who was cleaning a Vickers Machine-Gun, accidentally fired the gun whilst loaded. The bullet struck James, mortally wounding him and he died later that day. James was just 19 years old when he died, and is buried in Milford Haven Cemetery. He is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Many thanks to Paul Humphries for identifying James.

 

Frederick Harris, Sergeant, 563782, Royal Air Force. Frederick was the son of William Henry Harris and Emma Harris (nee Cornish) of Milford, and was the husband of Nesta Harris, of Pembroke Dock. He was a pre-war regular in the RAF, and flew with 228 Squadron, alongside another Milford man, Edward Setterfield. The Squadron was equipped with the obsolete Fairey Battle, and fought during the fall of France in 1940. Frederick must have been transferred to the Middle East, as he was killed on 1 November 1940 at the age of 26, and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

William Harteveld, Second Hand, Fishing Fleet. William was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Harteveld, Dutch emigrants who had moved to Milford Haven. He married Mary Selina Jenkins of Milford in 1915. He was a Fisherman, serving aboard the Fishing Vessel Respondo. The West Hartlepool registered Respondo was lost with all hands while fishing off the Irish Coast on 10 September 1940. William was 65 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Frank Reginald Hastings, Lance Corporal, PLY/X 100676, Royal Marines. Frank was the son of Frank Hastings and Jessie Hastings (nee James), of Milford Haven. He served with No.40 Royal Marine Commando. The Commando’s baptism of fire was at Dieppe on 19 August 1942. After suffering severe losses, the survivors were evacuated, and 40 Commando was rebuilt before being sent to the Mediterranean. It was sent to Sicily in July 1943 and a little later in September it saw action at Pizzio. Later that year the Commando was in action Termoli in October, and in 1944 was embroiled at Anzio. Frank was killed in Italy on 18 January 1944. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Minturno War Cemetery, Italy. His uncle, William Ronald Hastings died as a result of the Great War and another uncle George Robert Hastings was lost at sea during WW2.

 

George Robert Hastings, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. George was born on 9 January 1888, the son of Robert and Anne Marie Hastings, of Milford. He married Elizabeth Green of Milford Haven in 1912. He was Skipper of the Fishing Vessel Craigewan, a Milford Haven registered Trawler. George was one of the ten crew of Craigewan who died when she was lost at sea on 12 October 1945. George was 57 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He is not named on the Milford Memorial. His brother William Ronald Hastings died as a result of his service during WW1 and his nephew Frank died during WW2.

 

Ernest William Hawkings, Second Hand, LT/X. 10253B, Royal Naval Reserve. Ernest was born on 23 September 1911, the son of Francis Moxey Hawkings and Lilian Grace Hawkings, of Milford Haven. He married Gladys Rosina Maud Jenkins of Hakin in 1934. He served in the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HMS Oku. Ernest died on active service at Chatham on 3 July 1943, aged 31, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. His brother Francis was lost at sea during WW2.

 

Francis Ernest Hawkins, BEM, Fisherman, Fishing Fleet. Francis was the son of Francis Moxey Hawkings and Lilian Grace Hawkings, of Milford Haven, and lived at 87, Shakespeare Avenue, Milford Haven. He had been awarded the British Empire Medal early in the war, for his courage in action against enemy aircraft while aboard Trawler P & Y in 1941. He was drowned while serving aboard the Trawler M85 Ely, which sunk after colliding with HM Canadian Corvette Trillium on 14 January 1945. Francis was 35 years old. He is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission because the loss of M85 Ely was not seen as being war related. His brother Ernest also fell during WW2.

 

Michael Joseph Hennessy, Leading Seaman, LT/JX. 224445, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Michael was the son of James and Ellen Hennessy, of New Cross, Ireland. He married Annie Elizabeth Hicks of Milford Haven whilst working there as a fisherman. He served aboard HM Motor Minesweeper 38. She had been attacked and sunk on 18 August 1942 in the English Channel. Michael survived the sinking and was on leave in Swansea when he was killed in an air raid on 16 February 1943. He was 35 years old and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

John Hext, Deck Hand, Fishing Fleet. John was from Brixham, Devon. He lived at Milford prior to the war and served aboard Fishing Trawler Bass Rock, an Aberdeen registered trawler, which was based at Milford. He drowned when she was bombed and sunk by German aircraft off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland on 24 September 1940. John was 53 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Robert Benjamin High, Leading Aircraftman, 967883, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Robert was the son of Reginald Robert High and Myrtle High (nee Blockwell), of Milford Haven. He trained as a Pilot with No 2 Flying Training School at RAF Brize Norton. On 20 September 1940 Robert was carrying out a blind flying exercise in Oxford P9039 when it collided with Avro Anson N9821 of No 6 Flying Training School, and crashed in a field North of Great Barington. The occupants of both aircraft were all killed. Robert was 21 years old when he died that day and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. He is not commemorated on the Milford memorial, but at Steynton. His uncle, William Percy High also fell.

 

William Percy High, Chief Petty Officer, C/J 29145, Royal Navy. William was the son of Robert Haydon High and Emma High, of Gorleston, Norfolk. He had served during the Great War with the Nofolk Regiment before moving to Milford some years prior to WW2. He married Daisy Victoria Gilbert of Milford Haven in 1934. He joined the Royal Navy, and served aboard the minesweeper HMS Niger. William died on 6 July 1942 after Niger struck a mine off Iceland. He was 45 years old, and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent. His nephew Robert Benjamin High also fell.

 

Stanley Charles David Hill, Leading Stoker, R/KX 102256, Royal Navy. Stanley was the son of George Stanley Garnish and Eunice Lilian Hill (nee Garnish), of Precelly Place, Milford Haven. He had served with the Royal Navy in the Far East and during the Normandy landings before being posted to HMS Cochrane, the Naval Base at Rosyth. Stanley died on 3 September 1946, aged 28, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. Stanley is not named on the Milford memorial. His mother Eunice had lost her father Charles during the Great War.

 

Edward Hogg, Cook, Fishing Fleet. Edward was born on 17 April 1893, the son of John and Emma Hogg, of Great Yarmouth. He had served during WW1 with the Royal Naval Reserve, and lived at 35, Cromwell Road, Milford Haven. Edward then worked as a Cook aboard the Fishing Vessel Loch Awe. He was 50 years old when she was lost with all hands after leaving Milford on 24 February 1943. The crew of Loch Awe are not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Harry Albert Holder, Seaman, LT/JX 222282, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Harry was the son of Henry Howe Holder and Agnes Gwendoline Holder (nee Thomas), of Milford Haven. He served aboard HM Yacht Viva II. She had been hired in September 1939 as an anti-submarine vessel. Harry was killed when she was sunk by air attack off the north coast of Cornwall on 8 May 1941. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Ernest Horn, Leading Telegraphist, D/J 106419, Royal Navy. Ernest was the son of Alfred George and Sarah Ann Horn, of Milford Haven. He served aboard the V-class destroyer HMS Venetia, which had been in service since 1916. Ernest lost his life when Venetia was mined and sunk about 12 nautical miles north-east of Margate, Kent on 23 May 1940. He was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Edward Oscar Horwood, Private, 6140307, East Surrey Regiment. Edward was the son of Oscar and Mary Clementina Horwood, of London. He married Gwendoline Mary Holder of Milford Haven in 1936. He served with the 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment, which was in Malaya when the Japanese launched their offensive in December 1941. Edward was killed during the retreat through Malaya on 5 February 1942, aged 28. He is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore. Edward is not named on the Milford Memorial. His widow Gwendoline married Ryszard Trzeciok in 1956, and died in 1975.

 

William Edward Houghton, Boatswain, Fishing Fleet. William was born on 11 August 1902, the son of William and Margaret Houghton, of 74 Waterloo Road, Milford. He was the husband of L. G. Houghton, of Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire. He was boatswain aboard the Fishing Vessel Craigewan, a Milford Haven registered Trawler. William was one of the ten crew of Craigewan who died when she was lost at sea on 12 October 1945. He was 42 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. William is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Stanley George Hughes, Serjeant, 1669099, Royal Artillery. Stanley was the son of William and Sarah Hughes, of Steynton. He married Gwendoline Petera Sheppard Maddick of Milford Haven in 1927. He served with the Royal Artillery, and died on 13 June 1941 aged 37. Stanley is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. His widow Gwendoline died in 1997.

 

Charles Wilfred Humphries, Cook, Fishing Fleet. Charles was the husband of Scyllia Elizabeth Humphries (nee Perrett), of 17 Albion Street, Milford. He was the cook aboard the Fishing Vessel Craigewan, a Milford Haven registered Trawler. Charles was one of the ten crew of Craigewan who died when she was lost at sea on 12 October 1945. He was 37 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Charles is not named on the Milford Memorial. His widow Scyllia died in 1979.

 

George James Hyatt, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. George was the son of James and Susan Hyatt, of the Pier Hotel, Milford. He served aboard MV San Demetrio, a London registered tanker. She had been made famous during 1940, after an attack on her by the German Battleship Admiral Scheer had left her ablaze, forcing the crew to take to their lifeboats. On the following morning, one of her lifeboats returned to her, and half of the crew re-boarded the tanker, put out the fires and repaired the damaged steering system. She was then repaired and put back in service, but was sunk by a torpedo from U-404 on 17 March 1942. George was killed in the sinking. He was 37 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Thomas Howard Ireland, Second Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. Thomas was the husband of Gwendoline Ireland (nee Howells0, of Milford Haven. He appears to have served with the Royal Field Artillery during the Great War, before joining the Merchant Navy. He then served aboard SS Tabaristan, a London registered cargo vessel. On 29 May 1941 she was sailing unescorted on a voyage from Basrah via Capetown to Britain with a cargo of 3,950 tons of groundnuts, 2,200 tons of pig-iron, 560 tons of manganese ore and 140 tons of general cargo. At 23.50 hours the German submarine U-38 fired a spread of two torpedoes, both of which hit Tabaristan. She sank within four minutes, southwest of Freetown. Twenty one crew members were lost, while the master, 35 crew members and three gunners were picked up by HMS Bengali and the British armed trawler HMS Turcoman, and landed at Freetown. Thomas was sadly one of the men killed aboard Tabiristan. He was 40 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Charles Rowland James, Gunner, 864057, Royal Artillery. Charles was the son of Alice Maud James, of Pill, Milford Haven, and served with 218 Coast Battery, Royal Artillery. The battery served in the North African campaign. Charles was killed in North Africa on 10 June 1943. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

William Richard James, Serjeant, 847074, Royal Artillery. William was the son of George Evan James and Ethel May James, of Hakin, and served with 8 Coast Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment was stationed as part of the Hong Kong Garrison, and William was present in the desperate fighting for the city during December 1941. William was one of many prisoners captured when the British garrison surrendered to the Japanese on Christmas Day 1941. He survived four years of captivity, but died on 10 September 1945, at the age of 25, after being released from captivity. William is commemorated on the Sai Wan Memorial, Hong Kong.

 

Fred Jeffries, Fireman, Fishing Fleet. Fred was the son of Ethel Jeffries, of 53, Priory Road, Milford Haven. He lived at Shakespeare Avenue, Milford, and served aboard the Fishing Trawler Loch Awe. On 24 February 1943 Loch Awe left Milford for a fishing trip. Concern mounted at Milford, as she failed to return by her appointed date, and was never heard of again. Fred was 38 years old, and was one of ten men aboard Loch Awe, but as her fate is unknown, the crew aren't commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Howard Clifford Jenkins, Guardsman, 2735429, Welsh Guards. Howard was the son of James Howard Jenkins and Georgina Hetta Jenkins (nee Bisgrove), of Hakin, Milford Haven. He served with the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards. The Battalion fought during the fall of France in 1940, and after withdrawal spent the next four years in Britain, before taking part in the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944. Howard was killed during the fighting around Caen on 11 August 1944. He was 27 years old, and is buried at St. Charles De Percy War Cemetery, France.

 

Reginald John Mantell Jenkyn, Chief Engine Room Artificer, D/MX 54353, Royal Navy. Reginald was the son of Richard Jenkyn and Phoebe Sarah Jenkyn of Milford. He married Alice Thora Laugharne of 145, Charles Street, Milford in 1937. Reginald served with the Royal Navy aboard the cruiser HMS Penelope. She saw action during the evacuation of Allied troops from Crete in 1942, and at Malta later that year, and supported the allied invasions of North Africa and Italy. Reginald died when she was sunk in the Bay of Naples by U-410 on 18 February 1944. He was aged 33, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Marjorie Decima Job, Sister, 208530, Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service. Marjorie was the daughter of Mabel Job, of 57, Waterloo Road, Hakin. She lived at Raincliffe, The Rath, Milford Haven prior to the war. Marjorie served as a nurse with Queen Alexandria's Imperial Military Nursing Service during the war, and was based at the military hospital at Johannesburg. She died there on 21 September 1945, aged 37, and is buried in Johannesburg (West Park) Cemetery, South Africa. Marjorie is not commemorated on the Milford memorial.

 

Arthur Robert Jones, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1404449, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Arthur was the son of John and Jessie Jones. He married Martha Elizabeth Codd of Hakin, Milford Haven in 1937. He served during the war with the Royal Air Force, and died on 21 December 1947 as a result of illness brought upon by his service. He was 38 years old, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. Arthur is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Hugh Victor Reuben Jones, Chief Engineman, LT/203EV, Royal Naval Reserve. Hugh was the son of Hugh Morris Jones and Augusta Minnie Jones, of Milford Haven. He married Martha Evelyn Hart of Milford Haven in 1922. He served in the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Fleming. She had been hired for minesweeping duties in August 1939. Hugh was killed aboard her when she was sunk by an air attack in the Thames Estuary on 24 July 1940. He was 43 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

William Robert Jones, Deck Hand, Fishing Fleet. William was the son of Robert and Elenor Jones. He married Florence Doreen Irvin of Hakin, Milford Haven in the summer of 1945. He served as a deck hand aboard the Fishing Vessel Charmouth, which was based at Milford. William was killed when Charmouth pulled up a German sea mine in her nets while fishing off Cork on 14 November 1946, which exploded, sinking the trawler. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. William is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Rupert Joy, Seaman, LT/X 7899C, Royal Naval Reserve. Rupert was born on 9 September 1904, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Joy, of Milford Haven. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Fort Royal. She had been hired for minesweeping duties in August 1939, and later purchased by the Admiralty. Rupert was reportedly serving aboard the Steam Trawler Robert Bowen when she was sunk by an air attack off Aberdeen on 9 February 1940. He was 35 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Martin Kennedy, Trimmer, Fishing Fleet. Martin lived at of 21 Gwilli Road, Hakin. He served aboard the Milford registered Fishing Trawler Westfield. Martin was drowned when Westfield was lost, presumed sunk by enemy aircraft, on 6 July 1941. He was 52 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Cornelius Jabez King, Mate, Fishing Fleet. Cornelius was born on 31 December 1878, the son of Jabez and Martha King, of Gorleston, Suffolk. He lived with his wife Mary Anne Veale Bonney King, at 51, Dewsland Street, Milford Haven prior to the war. Cornelius served aboard the Steam Trawler Bianca, a Hull registered trawler. He drowned when Bianca was lost in the Irish Sea on 20 March 1941, possibly as a result of a mine explosion. Cornelius was 62 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His brother Jabez also died aboard Bianca.

 

Cornelius Walter King, Petty Officer, P/JX 139263, Royal Navy. Cornelius was the son of Albert Walter King and Elizabeth King (nee Shurvin), of Milford. He married Mary Joan Witts of Hakin at the beginning of 1940. Cornelius served aboard HMS Cairo. He was killed by a shell fragment when HMS Cairo was attacked and badly damaged during the evacuation of Norway on 28 May 1940. Cornelius was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial. His two uncles, Cornelius and Jabez King also fell.

 

Jabez George King, DSC, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. Jabez was born on 23 September 1882, the son of Jabez King, and of Martha King, of Gorleston-On-Sea. He lived with his wife Alice King, at 9, Starbuck Road, Milford Haven prior to the war. He was Skipper of the Steam Trawler Bianca, which had been registered at Hull, and was based at Milford, where she had been converted into a minesweeper. Jabez had won the Distinguished Service Cross for his work at sea during the Great War, which was gazetted on 14 July 1916. The award was for; ‘The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty have received with much satisfaction from the officers in charge of the Auxiliary Patrol areas at home and abroad reports on the services performed by the officers and men serving under their orders during the period 1st January, 1915, to 31st January, 1916. These reports show that the officers and men serving in Armed Yachts, Trawlers and Drifters of the Auxiliary Patrol during the period in question have carried out their duties under extremely arduous and hazardous conditions of weather and exposure to enemy attack and mines with marked zeal, gallantry and success.’ Sadly he survived the Great War, and was drowned when Bianca sank in the Irish Sea on 20 March 1941, possibly after a mine explosion. Jabez was 59 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His brother Cornelius also died in the loss of Bianca.

 

Thomas William King, Rifleman, 841864, the Royal Ulster Rifles. Thomas was the son of Henry Dickson King and Hilda King, of Milford. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Ulster Rifles. The battalion was part of the 3rd Division and landed on the Normandy beaches on 6 June 1944. Thomas was killed during the Battle of Normandy, on 9 July 1944. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Banneville-La-Campagne War Cemetery, France.

 

William Charles Langdon, Sergeant (Wireless Operator), 751603, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Charles Langdon and Sarah Langdon (nee Picton), of Milford Haven. He married Mary Elizabeth Hackett of Milford Haven in 1935. He served with 48 Squadron, RAFVR. Just before the outbreak of war the squadron began to fly anti-submarine patrols off the Channel coast, operating from a number of different stations, equipped with the Avro Anson. It took part in the air operations over Dunkirk, helping to keep the German E-boats away from the potentially vulnerable flotilla of ships off the beaches. William was killed in active service whilst on flying operations against the enemy around Liverpool on 1 January 1941, aged 25. He is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

Ernest Ledner, Fisherman. Ernest was the husband of Alice Maud Ledner, of Milford Haven. He served aboard the Fishing Trawler Loch Awe. On 24 February 1943 Loch Awe left Milford for a fishing trip. Concern mounted at Milford, as she failed to return by her appointed date, and was never heard of again. Ernest was one of ten men aboard Loch Awe, but as her fate is unknown, the crew aren't commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Arthur Abel Leggett, Lieutenant Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. Arthur was the son of Thomas and Charlotte Leggett, of Milford. He married Hilda May Knight of Hakin in 1926. Arthur served aboard HMS Lucifer, the Royal Naval base at Swansea. He died at Weston-Super-Mare on 7 March 1943, aged 38, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. His nephew Joseph Leggett also fell.

 

Joseph Thomas Leggett, Seaman, LT/JX 195758, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Joseph was the son of William Thomas Leggett and Edith Rosina Louise Leggett (nee Huddlestone), of Hakin. He served aboard HM Trawler St. Apollo. She had been purchased into the Royal Navy in February 1940, and converted for anti-submarine duties, joining the 3rd Escort Group based at Greenock, employed on Atlantic convoy escort. Joseph died when she was sunk in a collision with the destroyer HMS Sardonyx off the Hebrides on 22 November 1941. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial. His uncle Arthur Leggett also fell.

 

Arthur Lewis, Leading Seaman, LT/X 19275A, Royal Naval Reserve. Arthur was the son of Arthur and Sarah Lewis, of Milford Haven. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Marsoma. She had been hired for minesweeping duties in August 1939. Arthur was killed when she was sunk by a mine off Cromarty on 4 August 1940. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Vernon Charles Lewis, DFM, Flight Sergeant (Flight Engineer), 570550, Royal Air Force. Vernon was the son of Hubert William ‘Stokey’ Lewis, VC, and Edith Evelyn Lewis (nee Etherington), of Milford Haven. He was a brave man like his father and had served as a pre-war regular with the Royal Air Force. He had gained the Distinguished Flying Medal on 23 August 1943 while serving with 83 Squadron, RAF. Sadly though, Vernon was killed the following day. The Squadron was equipped with the Lancaster Bomber, and Vernon was killed when his Lancaster, Serial ED984, was shot down during a raid over Germany on 24 August 1943 killing six of its crew. Vernon was 22 years old, and is buried at Berlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery, Germany.

 

William John Lewis, Driver, 3914700, Royal Army Service Corps. Very little is known of William, but he served in North Africa with the Royal Army Service Corps, and died in Tunisia on 30 June 1943. William is buried at Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

Kenneth B. Lincoln, Ordinary Seaman, Merchant Navy. Kenneth was the son of Robert Percy Lincoln and Dorothy May Lincoln (nee Mills), of 31, Shakespeare Avenue, Milford. He had been a trawler-man before joining the Merchant Navy, and served aboard MV Narragansett, a London registered tanker, run by British Petroleum. On the morning of 25 March 1942, the unescorted Narragansett was hit in the stern by a torpedo from the German submarine U 105, and exploded and sunk about 400 miles east of Hampton Roads, Virginia, going down with all hands. Kenneth was 18 years old and is commemorated alongside his shipmates on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Sidney James Lloyd, Seaman, LT/JX 200851, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Sidney was from Milford. He married Minnie John, of Hakin, Milford Haven, in 1936. He served aboard the anti submarine vessel HM Trawler Lord Plender. He died at Yarmouth due to enemy action on 27 October 1941, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

Edgar Pincombe Locke, Fourth Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Edgar was the son of Archibald Robert and Sarah Ann Locke (nee Mackeen), of Hakin, Milford Haven. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Ocean Courage, a Liverpool registered liberty ship, and had been part of the crew which brought the ship over to England from its shipyard in America in 1942. On 15 January 1943, Ocean Courage was sailing from Pepel to Britain with a cargo of iron ore, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U 182, with the loss of 46 lives. Edgar was 25 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Lionel Edward Lowman, Trooper, 7943830, Royal Armoured Corps. Lionel was the son of Henry Lowman and Laura Lowman (nee Tatchell), of Milford. He served with the 147th Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps which converted from the 10th Battalion, The Hampshire Regiment. The regiment was equipped with the Churchill tank, and landed in Normandy as part of XXX Corps in June 1944. Lionel took part in the advance through Northern France into Belgium and Holland, and saw action during Operation Market Garden, when XXX Corps advanced towards the Rhine Crossings at Arnhem. Lionel died after the end of the war in Europe, on 12 June 1945, aged 34, and is buried at Hamburg Cemetery, Germany.

 

John Frederick Lyons, Corporal, 3909039, South Wales Borderers. John was the son of Rose Lyons (nee James), of Hakin, Milford Haven. He married Gladys May Clewer at Leominster in 1940. He served with the 7th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, and died in Cardigan on 15 February 1941. John was 21 years old, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

James Spratt Mackenzie, Leading Seaman, P/JX20956A, Royal Naval Reserve. James was the son of John Mackenzie and Mary Mackenzie (nee Cook), of Campbeltown, Scotland. He had married Minnie Eileen Davies of Milford Haven at some time early in the war. He served with the Royal Naval Reserve aboard the Hunt Class destroyer H.M.S. Easton. She had a busy war after since being commissioned in December 1942, and had been despatched to the Mediterranean. Easton supported the Allied landings at Sicily in 1943, before after having to return to Gibraltar after sustaining severe damage after ramming the German submarine U548 on 23 August 1943. In September 1944 she returned to service in the Mediterranean, and was deployed to support landings on the Aegean Islands. James was probably wounded during this time, and died on 8 October 1944, aged 26. He is buried at Khayat Beach War Cemetery, Israel. James is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Charles Edward Mansell, Serjeant, 8730677, the King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Charles was the son of Edward John Mansell and Beatrice Mansell (nee Griffiths), of Milford. He married Mary A. Cakley of Shrewsbury, Shropshire in 1939. He served with the 5th Battalion, King's Shropshire Light Infantry, which was raised in 1939, and trained at various places in Shropshire and remained on Home Defence duties for most of the war. Charles was probably attached to the 2nd KSLI, as they were the only battalion of the Regiment to serve in the Far East, and he died on 14 June 1942 aged 25. Charles is buried at Delhi War Cemetery, India.

 

Ernest Trevor Martin, Fusilier, 14205147, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Ernest was the son of Thomas Percy Martin and Emily Ellen Martin (nee Burder), of Milford Haven. He served with the 6th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The Battalion was part of the 53rd (Welsh) Division, and spent most of the war on home service. It landed on Normandy at the end of June 1944, and after fighting in the break-out from Normandy, took part in the drive into Belgium and Holland, into Germany, where it saw considerable action fighting around the Reichswald Forest. Ernest was killed here on 29 March 1945 aged just 22, and is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

John Percival Mathias, Captain, 177652, Parachute Regiment. John was the son of Thomas Henry Mathias and Maggie Mathias (nee Williams), of Milford Haven. He married Gladys Emma Edwards at Cardiff in 1937 and the couple moved to Milford Haven. He originally served with the 10th Battalion, The Royal Welch Fusiliers, which was converted to the 6th Battalion, The Parachute Regiment. John took fought with the battalion in North Africa, and took part in the landings at Sicily, and was killed on 10 September 1943 during the invasion of mainland Italy, when HMS Abdiel was bombed and sank in Taranto Harbour. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Cassino Memorial, Italy.

 

James Donald McKay, Chief Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. James was born on 19 December 1894, the son of James and Margaret McKay, of 51, St Annes Road, Hakin, Milford Haven. He married Ellen Laugharne of Priory Hill, Milford in 1922. James had served for many years with the Royal Naval Reserve, after seeing action during the Great War. During World War Two he served aboard HM Trawler Lord Stamp. She had been hired for anti-submarine duties in August 1939. James was killed when she was sunk by a mine in the Channel on 14 October 1940. He was 45 years old and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

William James McLean, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. William was born at Brixham on 9 March 1885, the son of James and Emma McLean. The family had moved to Milford by 1911. He married Matilda Gladys Davies of Milford Haven. He had served with the Royal Naval Reserve during the Great War and had been mentioned in despatches. During World War Two served aboard the Fishing Trawler John Baptish, of Milford. William was drowned when John Baptish was lost, presumed mined, on 7 September 1940. He was 55 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Samuel Garfield Memery, Seaman, LT/X 19673A, Royal Naval Reserve. Samuel was born on 11 August 1917, the son of William Samuel Memery and Gertrude Catherine Mary Memery (nee Watkins), of Hakin. He served aboard HM Trawler Pyrope. She had been requisitioned in August 1939 and converted to a minesweeper, joining the 2nd Minesweeping Group at Sheerness. Samuel was killed when she was sunk by an air attack in the Thames Estuary on 12 August 1940. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Thomas Moore, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. Thomas was the husband of Maud Mary Moore, of Hakin, Milford Haven, and served aboard the Fishing Trawler Lord Haldane, a Lowestoft registered trawler. Thomas drowned when Lord Haldane was lost due to enemy action with all hands in the Bristol Channel on 12 November 1940. He was 53 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Ernest Ralph Morgan, Chief Stoker, D/K 62331, Royal Navy. Ernest was the son of Clara Morgan, of Hay on Wye, Brecon. He had married Gwendoline Richards, of Barry Dock, Glamorgan in 1933 and the couple lived at Milford for several years prior to the war. Ernest served aboard the cruiser HMS Galatea. He was killed when Galatea was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-557 off Alexandria, Egypt on 15 December 1941. He was aged 36, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. Gwendoline later moved back to Barry Docks.

 

Howell Charles Morris, Lieutenant, 222124, Royal Artillery. Howell was the son of Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Edmund Morris and Phoebe Anne Morris (nee James), of Milford Haven, and served with the Royal Artillery. He volunteered early in the war for service with the newly formed Army Commando, and after passing his training at Achnacarry, was posted to No. 9 Commando. 9 Commando were sent to North Africa, to take part in Operation Torch, the Allied Landings on North Africa. They were then sent back to Britain, before moving back to the Mediterranean, and took part in the invasion of Italy. Howell was killed during the Italian campaign on 2 April 1945. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Ravenna War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Patrick Edward Musson, Petty Officer Stoker, D/K 62417, Royal Navy. Patrick was the son of Henry and Rose Anne Vicary Musson. He married Maisie Hardcastle Foster of Milford Haven in 1933. Patrick served with the Royal Navy aboard the frigate HMS Mourne. He was killed when Mourne was torpedoed by German submarine U-767 whilst patrolling off the Lizard in the English Channel on 15 June 1944. He was 38 years old and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Albert Leslie Neale, MC, Lieutenant, 163564, Royal Artillery. Albert was born at Milford on 28 January 1896, the son of Albert Ezra and Lilian Gostelow Neale. He was commissioned into the Lincolnshire Regiment during the Great War, training as a pilot before becoming an artillery observer with the Royal Flying Corps. He was awarded the Military Cross for this work, the citation of which was published in the London Gazette of 25 May 1917, and read: For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on many occasions. He carried out two successful contact patrols, flying for a considerable period very low and on our barrage, rendering very complete reports on each occasion. He rendered particularly good service in observing for siege batteries. He later commanded 60 Squadron, RFC, and remained with 31 Squadron, RAF after the war. During World War Two he rejoined the army, and was posted to the H.Q. of the 3rd Anti Aircraft Brigade, Royal Artillery. Albert died on active service in London on 3 May 1941, aged 45, and is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey. He does not appear to be commemorated in Pembrokeshire.

 

William Neslen, Seaman, LT/JX 224876, Royal Naval Patrol Service. William was the son of Robert and Edith Gertrude Neslen, of Norfolk. He married Emma Caroline Quantrill of Grimsby in 1932, and the couple moved to Hakin in 1939. William served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard HM Drifter Reed. On 7 November 1940, Reed was on duty in the Thames estuary, when she struck a German mine, blew up and sank with the loss of 12 lives. William was 27 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk. He is not named on the Milford Memorial. His widow Emma married Frank Hannaford at Milford in 1942, and died at Hakin in 1980 aged 66.

 

Leslie Llewellyn Nicholas, Flight Sergeant (Navigator), 1652501, Royal Air Force. Leslie was the son of William Nicholas and Letitia Nicholas (nee Davies) of Milford. He married Phyllis Mary Kelly Neyland in 1944. Leslie served with 21 Squadron, Royal Air Force, a light bomber squadron. The Squadron was formed at RAF Bodney equipped with the Blenheim. After a few months the squadron re-equipped with the Lockheed Ventura. It was the first RAF squadron to use the Ventura and was not operational until 6 December when it attacked the Philips works at Eindhoven. The aircraft was not suitable though, and were replaced in 1943 with the Mosquito. The squadron turned to night raids on continental Europe, it also carried precision daylight raids including a notable attack on Gestapo headquarters in Norway. During the invasion of Normandy, the Squadron was flying night intruder attacks against German targets, and moved to RAF Gutersloh in December 1944. Leslie was killed soon after, when he was shot down while acting as Navigator to Pilot Officer A. C. Adams in Mosquito NS990, on 27 February 1945. The aeroplane came down at around 22.00 near Bollersen, Niedersachsen, and Leslie and his pilot were buried in the Gemeindefriedhof at Bergen, before being re-interred to Hanover War Cemetery. Leslie was 22 years old.

 

Ernest Frederick Olney, Mate, Fishing Fleet. Ernest was born in Ireland in 1909. He married Ida Magdalene Reynolds, of 17, Dartmouth Street, Milford Haven in 1942. Ernest served as Mate aboard the Fishing Vessel Charmouth, which was based at Milford Haven. Charmouth had survived several close escapes during the war, but on 14 November 1946 its luck ran out, when it struck a forgotten German mine, blew up and sank. Ernest was 37 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Ernest is not commemorated at Milford.

 

Thomas Richard Owston, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. Thomas was the son of Ambrose Owston and Minnie Owston (nee James), of Milford Haven. He married Norah Maloney of Milford Haven in 1924. He was Skipper of the Fishing Trawler Respondo, a West Hartlepool registered trawler. Thomas drowned when Respondo was lost with all hands off the Old Head of Kinsale on 10 September 1940. He was 36 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Peter Edward Pettit, Fusilier, 14435777, the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Peter was the son of Joseph and Virtue Pettit, of Milford Haven. He served with the 4th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. Peter landed in Normandy with the Division at the end of June 1944, and took part in the subsequent fighting in the break-out from the Beachhead. He was killed on 14 August 1944 aged just 18, and is buried at Banneville-La-Campagne War Cemetery, France. His brother William also died just two months later.

 

William James Pettit, Corporal, 4204894, Royal Welch Fusiliers. William was the eldest son of Joseph Samuel Pettit and Virtue Pettit, of Milford Haven. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The Battalion fought in the Far East, against the Japanese in India and Burma. William died in Burma, just two months after his younger brother Peter, on 25 October 1944. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar. His brother Peter also fell.

 

David Henry Picton, Mate, Fishing Fleet. David was born on 3 December 1893, the son of David Henry and Annie Jane Picton, of Hakin. He married Alice May Braddick on 19 June 1918, and the couple had six children, living at Prioryville, Milford. David was a fisherman, and worked as mate aboard the Fishing Trawler Loch Awe. On 24 February 1943, Loch Awe left Milford to go fishing in the Atlantic. She was declared as overdue three weeks later, presumed to have been lost with all hands at some time after 28 February 1943. None of the crew of Loch Awe are commemorated by the CWGC. His son, John Henry Picton, and his brother in law Percy Gammer, also fell during the war.

 

John Henry Picton, Second Hand, LT/X 21109A, Royal Naval Reserve. John was the son of David Henry and Alice Picton of Milford. He married Dorothy Louise Soady of Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire whilst stationed there in 1941. He served aboard HM Motor Minesweeper 101, which had been built by Wagstaff & Hatfield, Port Greville, Nova Scotia. John was killed when she was sunk by a mine off Salonika, Greece on 29 November 1944. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial. His father, David Henry Picton, also fell.

 

Huys Pieter, Deck Hand, Fishing Fleet. Huys was a Belgian evacuee who lived at 38, Cromwell Road, Milford, and worked as a Deck Hand aboard the Steam Trawler Respondo. He was drowned when Respondo was lost, presumable after German air attack, off the Old Head of Kinsale on 10 September 1940. Huys was 32 years old and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Huys is not commemorated at Milford.

 

Clifford Vivian Potter, Gunner, 858027, Royal Artillery. Clifford was the son of Walter Bartholomew Potter and Ethel Potter, of Milford Haven. He married Winifred McCauch at Milford in 1940. Clifford served with 370 Coast Battery, Royal Artillery, which was stationed at Hilpsford battery at Barrow, Cumbria, under Western Command. On 26 November 1942 Clifford was among a large number of servicemen and women who had boarded the requisitioned passenger liner SS Ceramic at Liverpool. The ship set sail that night, bound for Australia via South Africa. Clifford was among a large number of troops who had been despatched to St. Helena. On the night of 6/7 December 1942, Ceramic was torpedoed by the German submarine U-515, about 420 miles north-west of the Azores. Most of the passengers and crew managed to get into the ships li9feboats, but a rough swell caused many of them to capsize, and of the 657 people on board, only one man survived. Clifford was 32 years old when he died, and is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey.

 

John Foster Powell, Aircraftman 1st Class, 654215, Royal Air Force. John was the son of John Edward Powell and Gertrude Powell (nee Golding), of Milford Haven, and served with the RAF Malayan Command. Little is known of him, but he died on 26 November 1944 aged 22, and is buried at Labuan War Cemetery, Malaysia.

 

Sidney James Powell, Pilot Officer (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner), 130526, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Sidney was the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Powell of Milford Haven. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, and was commissioned as a Pilot Officer on 3 October 1942. Sidney was posted to No. 29 Operational Training Unit, based at RAF North Luffenham. On 26 January 1943 he was taking part in a training flight aboard Vickers Wellington III, Serial BJ779, when it crashed near Wyton, killing all of the crew. Sidney was 21 years old, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

Albert Ernest Price, Petty Officer Airman, FAA/FX. 79387, Royal Navy. Albert was born on 23 October 1919, the youngest son of Herbert Sidney and Margaret Price of Glebelands, Milford Haven. He served with 700 Squadron, Fleet Air Army aboard HMS Dorsetshire. Dorsetshire was a County Class Heavy Cruiser, and was heavily armed, including in her arsenal two Supermarine Walrus aeroplanes, one of which was crewed by Albert. Dorsetshire had been sent to South America at the outbreak of war, to aid in the sinking of the Graf Spee, but arrived after she had been scuttled. She then served in the Atlantic, before moving to the Indian Ocean. In 1942, the Dorsetshire was assigned to the Eastern Fleet in the Indian Ocean. In the Imperial Japanese Navy's Indian Ocean raid on 5 April 1942, the Dorsetshire and her sister ship Cornwall were attacked by Japanese Navy dive-bombers, which sank both ships. Albert died in the sinking of Dorsetshire that day. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on Lee-On-Solent Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Margaret Zena Mary Price, Private, W/82980, Auxiliary Territorial Service. Margaret was the daughter of Arthur James Oliver and Florence E. Oliver 9nee McKay), of Milford Haven. She married Lieutenant Albert B. Price at Shrewsbury in 1942. Margaret died in Shrewsbury on 3 February 1944, aged 23, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

William Thomas Prior, Fusilier, 4196946, Royal Welch Fusiliers. William was born on 7 December 1918, the son of Thomas and Rosamund Alice Prior, of Milford Haven. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. The battalion was stationed in India at the outbreak of war, and it was here that William died on 1 May 1940. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Delhi War Cemetery, India.

 

Arthur Edward Pritchard, Second Hand, Fishing Fleet. Arthur was the son of Edith Ester Pritchard, and the husband of N. S. Pritchard, of Brixham, Devon. He served aboard the Fishing Trawler John Baptish, a Milford registered trawler, and drowned when she was lost on 10 September 1940. Arthur was 44 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Luigi Rabaiotti, Driver, T/143012, Royal Army Service Corps. Luigi was the son of Giovanni and Maria Rabaiotti of Bardi, Italy, and the Nephew of Giuseppe Rabaiotti, of Milford Haven. He served with the 656 Ambulance Division Troops Company, RASC. Luigi had seen service at Dunkirk with the BEF in 1940, and after being evacuated took part in the North African and Italy campaigns. He died in Italy during a car accident on 2 January 1946. Luigi was 26 years old, and is buried in the Rabaiotti Family Vault at Bardi Communal Cemetery, Italy. Many thanks to Bob Kettle for the details and the photo.

 

Wilfred Harold John Reed, Private, 3908455, the South Wales Borderers. Wilfred was the son of Wilfrid Harold John and Elizabeth Reed of Milford, and the husband of Kathleen Reed, of Londonderry, Northern Ireland. He served as a regular, with the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The Battalion was sent to Norway to counter the German invasion in 1940, and saw some terrible fighting, in conditions alien to the British troops. Wilfred was killed in Norway on 2 May 1940, aged 24, and is buried at Ballangen New Cemetery, Norway.

 

William Frederick Reid, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. William was the husband of Alice Anne Reid, of Hakin, Milford Haven. He was the skipper of the Fishing Vessel Charmouth, which was based at Milford Haven. Charmouth had survived several close escapes during the war, but on 14 November 1946 its luck ran out, when it struck a forgotten German mine, blew up and sank. William was 49 years old when he was killed in the explosion, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. William is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Edward Reynolds, Junior Engineering Officer, Merchant Navy. Edward was the son of William Francis Reynolds and Winifred Jane Reynolds (nee Baddiley), of 7, George Street, Milford Haven. He served in the Merchant Navy aboard SS Cadillac, a Newcastle-On-Tyne registered oil tanker. On 1 March 1941, Cadillac was en route from Aruba for Avonmouth, carrying a cargo of fuel oil, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine U-552. Edward was among 35 men lost with the ship. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Leonard Norman Reynolds, Sergeant, 1313246, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Leonard was born at Totnes, Devon, the son of William Reynolds and Mary Elizabeth Reynolds (nee Nicholls). The family later moved to Milford Haven. Leonard served with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. He was posted to No 10 Operational Training Unit, which was based at RAF Abingdon. On the night of 25 June 1942 Leonard took off from Abingdon as one of the crew of Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Mk V, Serial P4944, which was part of a force sent to bomb Bremen. The aircraft crashed in Germany on the following morning of 26 June 1942, killing all of the crew. Leonard was 19 years old when he died that morning, and is commemorated alongside two of his former crew-members on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Two other men are buried in Hamburg Cemetery.

 

Francis Victor Richards, Seaman, LT/JX 242672, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Francis was the son of Frank Richards and Kate Richards (nee Thomas), of Milford Haven. He served aboard HM Trawler Horatio. She had been built for minesweeping and anti-submarine duties, and launched in August 1940. Francis was killed when Horatio was sunk by an Italian Motor Torpedo Boat in the western Mediterranean on 7 January 1943. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Thomas Alfred George Roach, Fusilier, 3977237, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Cecilia Roach, of Milford. He married Norah Ivy Wigg of Hakin in 1937. He served with the 6th Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, part of the 38th (Irish) Infantry Brigade. The 6th Battalion fought in the Tunisian Campaign in North Africa and the 2nd Battalion took part in the landings on Sicily and then Italy, where some units of the 2nd Battalion took part in the fighting at Monte Cassino. Thomas was killed in Italy on 18 January 1944. He was 34 years old, and is buried at Orvieto War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Leslie Frank Roberts, Canteen Assistant, Navy Army and Air Force Institute. Leslie was the son of Nonus and Eileen Georgina Roberts, of Milford Haven. He worked for the NAAFI as a canteen assistant aboard the aircraft carrier H.M.S. Hermes. She had been the world's first purpose built aircraft carrier, being built towards the end of WW1. She was recalled from the reserve when WW2 broke out, and after several months with the Home Fleet sailed for the Indian Ocean. Hermes was sunk by Japanese dive bombers off Trincomalee on 9 April 1942. Leslie was killed in the sinking that day. He was 33 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon. Leslie is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Malcolm Russel Jenkyn Roberts, Second Officer, Merchant Navy. Malcolm was the son of Mark Roberts and Elizabeth A. Roberts (nee Jenkins), of Milford Haven. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. Trevarrack, a St. Ives registered cargo steamer. On 8 June 1941, Trevarrack was on route for Montreal from the Clyde when she was torpedoed and sank by the German submarine U-101. Malcolm was 29 years old when he died in the sinking, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Robert Eric Robinson, Bombardier, 794036, Royal Artillery. Robert was the son of William and Margaret Robinson. He married Hilda Sylvia King of 76, Marble Hall Road, Milford in 1935. The couple later moved to Wellington, Somerset. Robert served with 7 Coast Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was part of the Singapore Garrison. He was captured after the surrender of Singapore and sent to Thailand with 'F' Force in April 1943. Robert died at Kami Songkurai Camp on 18 November 1943, aged 31, and was originally buried in Kami Songkurai cemetery. His grave was later reinterred at Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery, Myanmar. Robert is not commemorated on the Milford Memorial.

 

Frank Joseph Rowland, Leading Seaman, LT/X 21432A, Royal Naval Reserve. Frank was the son of Frank Cecil Rowland and Laura Ellen Rowland (nee Shurvin), of Milford. He married Gwendoline Mary Walters of Milford Haven in 1941. Frank served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HMS Van Meerlant. She was an ex Royal Dutch Navy minelayer that had been taken over by the Royal Navy in March 1941, and was in use as an Anti Aircraft convoy leader. Frank died when she struck a mine in the Thames Estuary near the Girdler Light Vessel on 4 June 1941. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

John A. Salmon, Third Hand, Fishing Fleet. John was the husband of Cecilia Salmon (nee Goldspink), of Robert Street, Milford Haven. He served aboard the Milford Steam Trawler Loch Awe, and was drowned when she sank sometime after leaving Milford on 24 February 1943. He is not commemorated by the CWGC because Loch Awe is not regarded as a war loss. His widow Cecilia also lost her father, Cyril Robert Goldspink in the loss of Loch Awe.

 

William Sanderson, Boatswain (Bosun), Fishing Fleet. William lived at Greville Road, Milford, and was Bosun of the Fishing Trawler Loch Awe. He was drowned when Loch Awe went missing at sometime after leaving Milford on 28 February 1943. He is not commemorated by the CWGC because Loch Awe is not regarded as a war loss.

 

Percival James Mark Sandford, Chief Engineer, Fishing Fleet. Percival was born in Lowestoft on 30 September 1894. He was a Royal Naval Reservist from Norfolk who had been based in Milford during the Great War. He married Elizabeth Hannah Ayers in 1920. The couple moved to Milford Haven at some time, where Percival was Chief Engineer aboard the Fishing Trawler Westfield, a Milford trawler. Percival drowned when Westfield was lost on 6 July 1941. He was 46 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His widow Elizabeth died at Milford in 1957, aged 63.

 

William Reid Sandy, Third Hand, Fishing Fleet. William was born in Peterhead, Aberdeen on 11 June 1891, the son of Robert and Lily Sandy. He was based at Milford with the Royal Naval Reserve during the Great War and married Agnes Maud Curtis there in 1919, but Agnes sadly died in 1921. He remained single for many years, and married Sophia Annie Thomas of Milford Haven in 1943. William served aboard the Fishing Vessel Craigewan, a Milford Haven registered Trawler. William was one of the ten crew of Craigewan who died when she was lost at sea on 12 October 1945. William was 54 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. William is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Oliver Tucker Burman Sayers, DSM, Second Hand, LT/X 302SA, Royal Naval Reserve. Oliver was born in Milford on 1 February 1911, the son of Thomas Sayers and Alice May Sayers (nee Holder). He served with the Royal Naval Reserve aboard HM Trawler Force, which had been hired for minesweeping duties in February 1940. He had been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal on 3 September 1940, for skill and enterprise in Minesweeping operations off the Coasts of Holland, Belgium and France, but was killed when Trawler Force was sunk by an air attack off the Norfolk Coast on 27 June 1941. He was 30 years old and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Henry Edward Alfred Scard, Pilot Officer, 103043, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Henry was the son of Henry Scard and Mary Scard (nee Davies) of Milford. He married Marguerite L. Griffiths of Llandaff, Cardiff in 1940. Henry was an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects prior to the war, and served with 37 Squadron, RAFVR, equipped with the Vickers Wellington. In November 1940 the squadron was transferred to Egypt, via Malta, from where it carried out a number of sorties. Once in Egypt the squadron took part in the campaign in the western desert, supporting the Eighth Army against Rommel and the Afrika Korps. It also took part in the suppression of the Iraqi revolt and sent a detachment to Greece in March 1941. Henry was killed in the Middle East on 10 May 1942, aged 29. He is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Libya.

 

Eric Scrafton, Second Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. Eric was born in Manchester in 1913, the son of Christopher and Annie Scrafton. He married Eileen McNeilance at Salford in 1940, while on leave from the Merchant Navy. Eileen then moved to Hakin, Milford Haven. Eric served with the Merchant Navy, aboard the S.S. Rosenborg, a Port of Spain, Trinidad registered cargo steamer. On 8 June 1942, she was on route from Reyjavik for Swansea via Belfast, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-386 and sunk with the loss of 28 lives. Eric was 29 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

George Alfred Thomas Scriven, Third Hand, Fishing Fleet. George was the son of George Scriven, and of Victoria May Scriven (nee Davies), of Hakin, Milford Haven. He worked as third hand aboard the Fishing Vessel Charmouth, which was based at Milford Haven. George was killed when Charmouth pulled up a German sea mine in her nets, which exploded and sunk Charmouth on 14 November 1946. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. George is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Edward Albert Scrivens, Third Hand, Fishing Fleet. Edward was the son of William and Rosina Scrivens, of Norfolk. He married Hadassah Anna Sophia Abbott of 103, Robert Street, Milford Haven in 1938. He served aboard the Fishing Trawler Respondo, a Hartlepool registered trawler, and drowned when she was lost on 11 September 1940. Edward was 35 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Edward Louis Setterfield, Sergeant, 543241, Royal Air Force. Edward was born on 25 October 1919, the son of George Henry Setterfield and Eleanor Maria Setterfield (nee Brown), of Milford Haven. He served as a pre-war regular with 228 Squadron, Royal Air Forcde. The Squadron originally flew the obsolete Fairey Battle, and had been evacuated from France during the German Blitzkrieg of 1940. Edward was killed on 1 November 1940 while flying as part of the crew of Sunderland N9020, when it was attacked off Sicily by two Italian fighters, and came down with the loss of all her crew. Edwards' body was not recovered, and he is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Libya. His cousin William also fell.

 

William Richard Setterfield, Chief Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. William was the husband of Winifred Setterfield, of Milford Haven. He had served with the Royal Navy during the Great War, and during World War Two served aboard HM Trawler Roche Bonne. She had been requisitioned in February 1940 and converted to a minesweeper. William was killed when she was sunk in an air attack off the Lizard on 7 April 1941, after being machine-gunned by German aircraft. He was 44 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial. His cousin Edward also fell.

 

Albert Edward Simmonds, Able Seaman, D/JX 157997, Royal Navy. Albert was the son of Albert John Simmonds and Mabel Simmonds (nee Payne), of Milford Haven. He married Lilian Derham in 1940. He served aboard the Town-class cruiser HMS Gloucester. On 22 May 1941 HMS Gloucester was part of a task force which was scouting for German transport ships in the Kithera Channel, with the task of preventing German reinforcements from reaching Crete. She was attacked and sunk by a flight of Stuka dive-bombers that day, with the loss of 722 men. Albert was 19 years old when he died in the sinking that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Alfred Skewis, Skipper, Fishing Fleet. Alfred was born at Trimley St Mary, Suffolk on 13 September 1890, the son of Daniel and Sarah Skewis. His mother was from Milford and by the turn of the century the family had returned there. Alfred married Edith Alice Hughes in 1913 and the couple resided at 13, Dartmouth Gardens, Milford Haven. He had served with the Royal Naval Reserve on minesweepers during the Great War, and was Skipper of the Steam Trawler Bass Rock, an Aberdeen registered trawler. Alfred was killed when Bass Rock was attacked by German aircraft and sunk on 24 September 1940. He was 50 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Charles Henry Smith, Chief Engineer, Fishing Fleet. Charles was the son of John and Amy Smith, of Hakin, and the husband of Ivy Maud Smith of Milford Haven. He was the chief engineer aboard the Fishing Vessel Grenada, which was registered at Hull. On 3 October 1945 she was fishing off the Old Head of Kinsale when she struck a German sea mine and sunk, with the loss of all bar one of her crew. Charles was 36 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Richard Smith, Seaman, LT/JX 400443, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Richard was the son of Percy Sydney and Alice Maud Smith, of Hakin, and served aboard HM Trawler Cap D'Antifer. She was an ex Belgian trawler, converted by the French Navy to a minesweeper, and was seized at Southampton in July 1940 and converted to an auxiliary patrol vessel. In 1941 she was converted back to a minesweeper and based on the Humber, and in 1943 joined 19th M/S Group at Grimsby. Richard was killed when she was torpedoed by an E-boat off the Humber on 13 February 1944. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

James Snelling, Able Seaman, D/SSX 17740, Royal Navy. James was the son of James Snelling and Kate Snelling (nee James), of Milford Haven. He had joined the Royal Navy in 1936 and served aboard the battleship HMS Valiant. He drowned after falling overboard from Valiant on 16 February 1940, aged 22, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. His brother Thomas and their cousin Frank Hastings also fell.

 

Thomas Henry Snelling, Seaman, LT/JX 219627, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Thomas was the son of James Snelling and Kate Snelling (nee James), of Milford Haven. He served at HMS Hannibal, the Royal Naval Base at Algiers. He died in North Africa on 20 June 1943, aged just 19, and is buried at La Reunion War Cemetery, Algeria. His brother James and their cousin Frank Hastings also fell.

 

David George Spindler, Third Hand, Fishing Fleet. David was born on 27 March 1898, the son of David and Ellen Spindler. He married Ethel Ruth Howlett in 1923, and the family moved to 35, Shakespeare Avenue, Milford at the outbreak of war. David was a former Royal Naval Reservist and served aboard the Steam Trawler Exeter. On 29 March 1941 Exeter was on route to fishing grounds off the south coast of Ireland when she was attacked and sunk by German aircraft five miles off Ballycotton, with the loss of all her crew. David was 43 years old and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Ethel moved the family back to Lowestoft after the war and died in 1981, aged 79. David is not commemorated on the Milford memorial.

 

Eric Stanley, Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. Eric was the son of Henry and Sarah Stanley of 39, Flinton Street, Hull. He married Mona Gertrude Summers of Hakin, Milford Haven in 1943. He died in Fulham on 23 February 1944, aged 33, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. Eric is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Lawrence Stewart, Sergeant (Pilot), 748297, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Lawrence was the son of Lawrence Leonard Stewart and Maud Stewart (nee Best), of Hull. He married Margot Elizabeth Baker of Milford Haven in 1939. He served as a pilot with 82 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a light bomber unit, equipped with the Bristol Blenheim, and was used to attack enemy shipping in the North Sea. Lawrence was killed when his Blenheim was shot down on 12 March 1941. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany. Lawrence is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Ladner Summers, Second Hand, LT/JX. 241895, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Ladner was the son of William and Clara Summers, of Milford Haven. He married Elizabeth Myfanwy John of Goodwick in 1943. Ladner served aboard HM Yacht Tyrant. He was one of two men killed when Tyrant was attacked by German bombers on 23 February 1944. He was 28 years old and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

Bernard Spencer Taylor, Ordinary Seaman, LT/JX 228027, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Bernard was the son of Herbert Taylor and Mabel Taylor (nee Lawrence), of Milford Haven, and served aboard HM Trawler Silicia. He died at Grimsby on 18 February 1941, aged 17, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery. Silicia was later lost when she struck a mine in the Humber on 8 May 1941.

 

Charles Henry Taylor, Seaman, LT/X 21666A, Royal Naval Reserve (Patrol Service). Charles was the son of Charles Henry Taylor and Olive Taylor (nee Field), of Steynton. He served with the Royal Naval Reserve. He was posted to the Royal Naval Patrol Service, and served aboard H.M. Trawler Pyrope, which had been converted by the Admiralty for use in anti submarine operations. Charles lost his life when Pyrope was lost on 12 August 1940 in the Thames estuary due to German air attack. He was 19 years old and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

William Henry Taylor, Able Seaman, P/JX 167937, Royal Navy. William was the son of Thomas Henry Taylor and Martha Taylor (nee Morgan), of Milford Haven. He served aboard the sloop HMS Egret. Egret had the dubious honour of being the first ship ever to be sunk by a guided missile when she was destroyed by a Henschel glider bomb on 27 August 1943. William was among the 194 crewmen of Egret killed. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, England.

 

Albert Frederick Thomas, Gunner, 1796242, Royal Artillery. Albert was the son of Richard Thomas and Phoebe Matilda Thomas (nee Fryatt), of Milford Haven. He served with 89 Battery, 35 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. The Battery served in the Dutch East Indies, and saw hard fighting during the Japanese invasion. Albert was taken prisoner by the Japanese sometime in March 1942, and died on 14 May 1942, aged just 20. He is buried at Jakarta War Cemetery, Indonesia.

 

Charles William Thomas, Fusilier, 4196674, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Charles was the son of Richard Charles and Margaret Ellen Thomas, of Milford Haven, and served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Charles served with the battalion in Burma, fighting against the Japanese, and died there on 5 May 1944. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

 

Edwin Stanley Thomas, Boatswain (Bosun), Fishing Fleet. Edwin lived at 10, Greville Road, Milford Haven, and was Bosun aboard the Hull registered Steam Trawler Bianca. Edwin was drowned when Bianca sank in the Irish Sea on 20 March 1941, probably due to a mine explosion. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Frank Ronald Thomas, Ordinary Seaman, C/JX. 167938, Royal Navy. Frank served aboard HMS Royal Arthur, the training base at Skegness. He died ashore on 30 November 1939 aged just 20, and is buried at Milford Haven Cemetery.

 

 

George Henry Thomas, Seaman, LT/6939C, Royal Naval Reserve. George was the son of Jack and Elizabeth Thomas, of Milford Haven, and the husband of Annie Elizabeth Thomas, of Milford Haven. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service, aboard HM Trawler Benvolio, which had been hired for minesweeping duties in September 1939. George was killed when Benvolio was sunk after hitting a mine off the Humber on 23 February 1940. He was 35 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Herbert Paxton Thomas, Telegraphist, D/WRX 1264, Royal Naval Volunteer (Wireless) Reserve. Herbert was the son of Charles Paxton Thomas and Laura Thomas (nee Bryan) of Milford. He married Esther Gwyneth Reynolds of Dale in 1941. He served aboard the frigate HMS Gould. Herbert died when Gould was torpedoed and sunk south-west of Ireland by the German submarine U-358 on 1 March 1944. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

William Henry Thomas, Leading Seaman, LT/JX 265225, Royal Naval Patrol Service. William was the son of Richard and E. Phoebe Matilda Thomas, of Milford Haven, and the husband of Edith Ellen Thomas, of Milford Haven. He served aboard HM Trawler Flotta. William died when Flotta was lost on 6 November 1941. He was aged 34, and is buried at Wick Cemetery, Caithness-Shire.

 

William Henry Thomas, Fusilier, 4196954, the Royal Welch Fusiliers. William was the son of John Henry and Ann Thomas of Milford, and the husband of Dorothy Catherine Thomas, of Neyland. He served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers in Burma and India, and died there on 25 February 1943. William is buried at Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar.

 

Robert Eric Thompson, Petty Officer, D/JX 152250, Royal Navy. Robert was the son of Robert Thompson and Emily Robina Thompson (nee Wolfe) of Milford. He married Phyllis Joan Medland of Paignton, Devon in 1942. He served at HMS Assegai, a shore based in South Africa. Robert was one of a number of men posted from Assegai aboard the SS Khedive Ismail, a turbine steamship which had been converted for use as a troop carrier. On 5 February 1944 she left Mombasa for Colombo, carrying 1,324 passengers, including troops and nurses. On the afternoon of 12 February 1944 she was torpedoed and sunk by the Japanese submarine I-27. The submarine dived beneath the survivors to attempt to escape a depth charge attack, but the Royal Navy destroyers that had been escorting Khedive Ismail continued the attack, sinking the I-27. During the sinking of the ship and the ensuing action, 1,220 men and 77 women were killed. Robert was 27 years old when he was killed that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

 

Arthur Tickner, Cook, Fishing Fleet. Arthur lived at 19, Dartmouth Gardens, Milford. He was the Cook aboard the Fishing Trawler Respondo, a Hartlepool registered trawler, and drowned when she was lost on 11 September 1940. Arthur was 50 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

Benjamin Robert Tobutt, Deck Hand, Fishing Fleet. Benjamin was the son of Benjamin and Alice Tobutt, of Hakin, Milford Haven. He married Alice Phillips of Milford in 1940. He served aboard the Milford registered Steam Trawler Westfield. Benjamin was drowned when Westfield went missing, presumed bombed and sunk by German aircraft off St. Govan's Head on 6 July 1941. He was 37 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Albert Henry Tucker, DSC, Lieutenant Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. Albert was the son of Albert Henry Tucker and Miriam Berry Tucker (nee James). He married Frances Mary Elizabeth Edwards of Milford Haven in 1932. He served aboard HM Motor Minesweeper 168, and was killed when she struck a mine in Genoa Harbour on 25 June 1945. Albert was 38 years old, and is buried at Staglieno Cemetery, Italy. He had been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on 29 September 1942 for bravery and skill while minesweeping. His brother Fred also fell.

 

Ernest Percy Tucker, Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. Ernest was the son of Albert and Elizabeth Tucker of 73, Mount Pleasant Road, Brixham. He had commanded HM Trawler Stonefly from mid 1942. He died at Weymouth on 10 February 1945 aged 39, and is buried at Reading (Henley Road) Cemetery.

 

Fred James Sturdee Tucker, Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. Fred was the son of Albert Henry Tucker and Miriam Berry Tucker (nee James), of Milford Haven. He married Virtue Louise Mowthorpe of Hakin in 1937. He served at HMS Stag, which was the Naval shore establishment at Port Said, Egypt, with several satellite bases in the area. Fred was posted aboard the SS Empire Endurance, and was posted as missing believed killed on 20 April 1941. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial. His brother Albert also fell.

 

Ernest Charles Underwood, Engineman, LT/X 5919ES, Royal Naval Reserve. Ernest was born at Neyland on 19 July 1907, the son of Benjamin and Annie Underwood. He served aboard HM Trawler Fleming, which had been hired for minesweeping duties in August 1939. He was killed when Fleming was sunk by an air attack in the Thames Estuary on 24 July 1940. He was 33 years old and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

William Lewis Union, Second Hand, LT/JX217803, Royal Naval Patrol Service. William was the son of James John Union and Margaret Ellen Union of Milford. He married Gwendoline Maud Thomas of Pill, Pembrokeshire in 1929. He served aboard HM Trawler Abronia. William died during an air raid on 7 September 1940 aged 33, and is buried at East London Cemetery, Plaistow.

 

Rupert Greville Vanner, Master, Merchant Navy. Rupert was the son of John Hughes Vanner and Fanny Elizabeth Vanner, of Hamilton Terrace, Milford. He married Enid Hughes of Milford in 1933. He was Master of SS Bradfyne, a Bideford registered vessel. Bradfyne had sailed from Montreal with a cargo of grain for Belfast and joined up with the 33 ship Convoy SC-11 which sailed from Sydney, Cape Breton on 9 November 1940. On 22 November Bradfyne was torpedoed by U-100 in the Atlantic South-East of Rockall and sank. Rupert and 37 of his crew were lost, and four were rescued by the Norwegian ship Norske King and landed at Belfast. Rupert was 37 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Thomas George John Warlow, Stoker, LT/KX 109957, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Thomas was the son of Thomas Warlow and Alice Warlow (nee Evans), of Milford. He married Sarah Ellen Thomas of Tier's Cross in 1937. He served aboard HM Trawler Almond, which was a Tree class admiralty trawler, taken into service May 1940 as a minesweeper. Thomas died when Almond was sunk by a mine off Falmouth on 2 February 1941. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Stanley George Watkins, Deck Hand, Fishing Fleet. Stanley was the son of Thomas Bertie Lloyd Watkins and Florence Martha Watkins (nee Jones), of Milford Haven. He served aboard the Milford registered Steam Trawler Westfield, and was drowned when Westfield went missing on 6 July 1941, probably as a result of a German aircraft attack.  Stanley was 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

William John Trevor Watkins, Third Hand, Fishing Fleet. William was the son of William John Watkins, and of Margaret Anne Watkins (nee James), of 7, Brooke Avenue, Milford Haven. He served aboard the Steam Trawler Bianca, a Hull registered trawler. William drowned when Bianca was lost in the Irish Sea on 20 March 1941, possibly after a mine explosion. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Robert George Watt, Seaman, LT/JX 400154, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Robert was born at Milford on 6 July 1923, the son of Robert Watt and Victoria Maud Watt (nee Roch). His parents later lived at Grange Town, Cardiff, while Robert enlisted into the Royal Navy. He served aboard H.M. Motor Launch 3. Robert died whilst H.M.M.L. 3 was based in Durban, South Africa on 24 April 1943. He was 19 years old and is buried in Durban (Stellawood) Cemetery, South Africa. Robert is not commemorated on the Milford memorial, although he is commemorated on a family grave at Milford Haven cemetery.

 

William Werrett, Private, K/42348, Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps. William was born at Nantyglo on 25 April 1887, the son of George and Rachel Werrett. He married Blodwen Morgan, of Brynmawr on 6 May 1911. William had served during WW1 with the South Wales Borderers, and between the wars emigrated to Canada. Blodwen set up home at Milford Haven. William became ill while in Canada, and he died on 24 March 1942, aged 46. He is buried at Truro Cemetery, Nova Scotia, Canada. His daughter Blodwen remained in Milford with his widow, and married William Sinfield in 1946. William is not named on the Milford Memorial.

 

George Alfred Whichello, DSC, Lieutenant Skipper, Royal Naval Reserve. George was the son of George and Edie Whichello. He married Lilian Elizabeth Armstrong of Milford Haven on 28 January 1932. George served aboard HM Trawler Orfasy. He had been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on 11 June 1942 for a rescue mission whilst escorting a convoy, which was attacked by German aircraft. One ship was lost [probably SS Ratula], and a rescue was initiated by Whichello, in launching a small boat to rescue sailors from the burning ship loaded with aviation fuel which was about to explode at any time. George was killed when Orfasy was sunk after being torpedoed on 22 October 1943. He was 36 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

George Henry Whitfield, Lance Bombardier, 1082599, Royal Artillery. George was the son of Frederick Walter and Gertrude Ellen Whitfield, of Milford Haven. He served with 75 Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery. George was killed during the invasion of Italy on 14 August 1944. He was 35 years old, and is buried at Florence War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Frederick Harold Williams, Chief Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Frederick was the son of Joe and Julia Williams, and the husband of E. E. Nora Williams, of Milford Haven. He served as Chief Engineer aboard MV British Security, a London registered vessel. Frederick lost his life when she was torpedoed and set on fire by the German submarine U-556 in the Atlantic, South of Cape Farewell 20 May 1941. She later sank three days later. She was on voyage from Curacao to Bowling via Halifax, Nova Scotia with a cargo of benzene and kerosene, as part of convoy HX 126 comprising of 29 ships. Frederick was 45 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Vivian Francis Williams, Lance Serjeant, 3957411, the Welch Regiment. Vivian was the son of Benjamin Williams and Elizabeth Ann Williams (nee McCallum). He served with the 1st Battalion, Welch Regiment, as a regular soldier. At the outbreak of WW2, the 1st Welch was stationed in North Africa, at Mersa Matruh. The Battalion was then sent to Crete, where it was decimated during the German airborne assault of the island from 16 February 1941 - 31 May 1941, and the few remnants of the battalion were withdrawn to North Africa. The survivors were then caught up in Rommel’s drive through the desert, and fought a desperate rearguard action, retreating over several hundred miles of desert between 28 January 1942 and 20 May 1942. Vivian was killed during this retreat, possibly on 14 February 1942. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Libya.

 

The Korean War

 

William Albert Edwards, Gunner, 1440384, Royal Artillery. William was born at Milford on 2 November 1920, and probably served during World War Two. He was killed in the Korean War, on 5 January 1951 at the age of 30, and is commemorated on the U.N. Memorial, Pusan.

 

The Iraq War

 

Eddie Collins, Sergeant, Special Air Service. Eddie was born at Milford Haven on 12 November 1973, and had joined the 2nd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, before being posted to their elite Pathfinder Platoon. He had passed the gruelling selection test for the Special Air Service before being posted to Iraq as part of a hard arrest team. On 5 September 2007 Eddie was the troop leader of a large hard arrest team that burst into a house in Baghdad to arrest a terrorist leader, but he was shot in the head and killed. He was 33 years old. As is usual with S.A.S. operations, no more details can be found. Eddie was brought home for burial at Credenhill Military Cemetery.

Website News

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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