West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Pembroke Dock WW2 Memorial

Pembroke Dock is the third largest town in Pembrokeshire, and is situated on the River Cleddau. The town began life as a rural estate in the Middle Ages, but was really established with the building of the Royal Dockyard in 1814. The importance, and location, of Pembroke Dock as a Dockyard grew throughout the remainder of the 19th Century, but by the beginning of the 20th Century the town was in decline. War brought about resurgence in the town, both during WW1 when the Dockyards were widely used, and during WW2, when Pembroke Dock played host to various Squadrons of the Royal Air Force, being home to the famous Sunderland flying boat. The War Memorial for the town was unveiled on 30 July 1921, and stands outside St. John’s Church. The War Memorial which commemorates the fallen of WW2 is located inside St John’s Church, and takes the form of a wooden plaque, which commemorates those who fell while serving with the armed forces, and also the civilians who fell. Oddly several of these WW2 casualties died many years after the war. It is very rare to see a memorial commemorate people in this way. To download a PDF sheet of this page with photographs inserted, please follow this link: Pembroke Dock WW2 War Memorial.

 

The Armed Forces-World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Arthur William Allan, Signalman, 2584035, Royal Corps of Signals. Arthur was the son of Percival and Elizabeth Allan, of Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. Arthur was a pre war regular in the Army, and was in France at the outbreak of war, serving with the Royal Signals. Arthur was killed during the retreat to Dunkirk on 29 May 1940. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Oostduinkerke Communal Cemetery, Belgium.

 

William Leonard Ambrose, Lieutenant (Q.M.), 51297, Essex Regiment. William was the son of William G. Ambrose and Charlotte R. Ambrose, and the husband of Iris C. M. Ambrose, of Pembroke Dock. He served as Quartermaster with the 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment. In April 1941, a coup in Iraq led to the creation of a pro-German dictatorship, and so the British sent a force into Iraq to depose this new government, and return Iraq to British rule. The next stage was the Syria-Lebanon campaign, and it was during this second stage of the offensive that William was killed on 23 June 1941. He was buried at Damascus Commonwealth War Cemetery, Syria.

 

Gerald Albert Attew, Leading Aircraftman, 1175121, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Gerald was the son of Thomas and Ethel Attew, and the husband of Lena C. Attew, of Pembroke Dock. He served during the war with the Royal Air Force, and died in Italy after the war had ended, on 28 November 1945. Gerald is buried at Naples War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Henry George Baker, Leading Aircraftman, 1404455, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Henry was the son of Henry and Rachael Baker, of Pembroke Dock, and served with the Royal Air Force. Little else is known of Henry, but he died on 14 April 1947, aged 25, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Albert Owen Besant, Bombardier, 1071117, Royal Artillery. Albert was the son of Ralph Frank Besant and Mary Anne Besant (nee Dawkins), of Pembroke Dock. He served with the Headquarters of 7 Heavy Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. The Battery was part of the Air Defence force at Malta. Albert was killed on Malta on 6 July 1942, aged 30. He is buried at Imtarfa Military Cemetery, Malta.

 

John Henry Bevans, Sergeant (Pilot), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was born at 7, Waterloo Terrace, Pembroke Dock in 1917, the son of Shipwright Inspector John Bevans, and of Emilie Jane Bevans (nee Williams). He was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School, and served as a Pilot with 106 Squadron, Royal Air Force. At the outbreak of the Second World War the squadron was flying Hampdens with No. 5 Group, and until early 1941 had a training role. It then reverted to front-line status and began regular night bombing operations against Fortress Europe. John was killed when his Hampden was shot down on one such raid, over Germany, on 30 June 1941. He was 24 years old, and is buried alongside his crew at Sage War Cemetery, Germany. His parents later moved to Acton, Middlesex.

 

Kenneth Lewis Bittle, Marine, RME/10972, Royal Marine Engineers. Kenneth was the son of William John and Minnie Maria Bittle (nee Lewis), of 49, Military Road, Pembroke Dock. Little else is known of him, but he served with the Royal Marine Engineers, and died on 10 June 1943, aged 23. Kenneth was buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Ronald Frederick Bittle, Private, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Ronald was born on 19 April 1917, the son of William John and Minnie Maria Bittle (nee Lewis), of 49, Military Road, Pembroke Dock. He had served throughout WW2 with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. He died in 1990, aged 73, so it is a mystery why he is named on the memorial.

 

Clifford George Brighty, Gunner, Royal Artillery. Clifford was born on 1 December 1918, the son of George and Stella Brighty (nee Payne). He served during WW2 with the Royal Artillery. He married Priscilla Davies after returning to Pembroke after the war, and died in 1978, aged 58. Priscilla died in 1994. It is not clear why Clifford is on the memorial.

 

Charles John Westley Brinn, Sergeant (Observer), 563306, Royal Air Force. Charles was born in Tenby in 1912, the son of John Melbourne Brinn and Rosa Brinn (nee Ormond). He served in 59 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was part of Fighter Command. The Squadron had moved to France during October 1939, equipped with Bristol Blenheim's, and undertook reconnaissance missions in conjunction with the rapidly retreating BEF during those desperate few months in 1940, when they were being pushed back by the Germans towards Dunkirk. Charles died when his Blenheim IV, Serial L9266 was shot down over France on 22 May 1940, and is buried at Fricourt Communal Cemetery alongside two of his crew members, Francis Bird and Gordon Coles. Charles is also commemorated at St. Issells Church, Saundersfoot.

 

Donald Broad, Stoker, Royal Navy, H.M.S. Exeter. This man cannot be identified, but is believed to be Donald Broad of the Royal Navy. Donald survived the sinking of Exeter during the Second Battle of the Java Sea on 1 March 1942, and was one of around 800 survivors taken prisoner by the Japanese. He survived three years in the notorious death camps, working on the Thai-Burma Railway, and was given up for dead by his family. Donald returned home in 1946 after the Japanese surrender, and in 1948 married Gertrude James at Pennar. He worked for the MOD at HM mooring and Salvage Depot Pembroke Dock on the small craft, but in 1975 was injured when he was struck by a swinging boom. Donald died early in 1977, aged 57. Many thanks to Basil Hughes for sending me the details about his late friend Donald.

 

Howard John Calnon, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. Howard was born on 18 January 1913 the son of Daniel and Margaret Calnon of 15, Military Road, Pennar. He was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He served in the Merchant Navy aboard the M.V. Empire Comet, a Greenock registered cargo vessel. On her final voyage, she had loaded a general cargo, including manganese ore, tea, groundnuts and linseed oil in Bombay for Manchester, sailing on 12 November 1941. After a stop off at Table bay the ship sailed to Halifax, Nova Scotia where she joined up with the 27 ship Liverpool bound Convoy HX-174 which sailed on 7 February 1942. It is believed around 10 February the Empire Comet became detached from the main Convoy whilst in dense fog, as she was last seen on 17 February. The ship, all 37 crew and 8 gunners, were never seen again, and she was declared a war loss on 19 February 1942. She had actually been torpedoed and sunk by U-136. Howard was 29 years old when Empire Comet was lost. He is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Colin James Campbell, Flight Sergeant (Air Gunner), 403757, Royal New Zealand Air Force. Colin was the son of Allan Campbell and of Grace Campbell (Nee Menzies), of Bannockburn, Otago, New Zealand. He served with 218 (Royal Air Force) Squadron, Royal New Zealand Air Force, and while stationed in Britain had lived with his wife Edna May Campbell at Pembroke Dock. The Squadron was a heavy bomber Squadron, equipped with the Short Stirling. Colin was killed when his Stirling, Serial BF343, was shot down near Dieppe on 12 March 1943. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Dieppe Canadian War Cemetery, Hautot-Sur-Mer, France.

 

Salvatore de Candia, Second Officer, Merchant Navy. Salvatore was the son of Francis Paul and Catherine De Candia, of Neyland. He was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He married Dorothy Ruth Davies in 1932, and the couple resided at 1, New Hill Villa, Goodwick. Salvatore served in the Merchant Navy, and at the outbreak of war served aboard the SS St. Patrick, a ferry which served on the Fishguard to Rosslare route. On 13 June 1941, she left Fishguard bound for Ireland. Upon rounding Strumble Head, she was spotted and attacked by German dive bombers, which set the ship on fire. Many of the passengers were rescued, but Salvatore was killed during the attack. He was 37 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 90 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Herbert Henry Carter, Lance Corporal, 4185856, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Herbert was the son of James Henry and Elizabeth Carter, and the husband of Constance Ivy Carter, of Pembroke Dock. He was a regular soldier, serving with the Royal Welch Fusiliers, when he died in Flintshire on 13 April 1940, aged 33. Herbert is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Charles Victor Catherall, Sergeant (Observer), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Charles was the son of Edward Allen Catherall and Margaret Ann Catherall of Pembroke. He married Margaret Phelps of Monkton in 1941. He served as an Observer with 37 Squadron, RAF. The Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Vickers Wellington. In November 1940 the squadron was transferred to Egypt, via Malta, from where it carried out a number of sorties. Once in Egypt the squadron took part in the campaign in the western desert, supporting the Eighth Army against Rommel and the Afrika Korps. It also took part in the suppression of the Iraqi revolt and sent a detachment to Greece in March 1941. Charles was killed in North Africa on 16 November 1941. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

Mervin Charles Clapton, Private, 5381460, The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Mervin was the son of Charles and Sarah Clapton, of Pembroke Dock. He married Queenie May Richards of Coleford, Gloucestershire in 1943. He served with the 2nd (Airborne) Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, which had originally been an infantry unit, which converted to become paratroopers in 1941. The new formation became part of the 1st Airlanding Brigade, and saw its first action in the Middle East in May 1943. The 2nd Ox and Bucks were then prepared for the assault on Fortress Europe, joining the 6th Airborne Division, and took part in the famous landings on the bridges over the River Orne and adjacent Canal in Normandy (subsequently known as the attack on Pegasus Bridge), on D-Day, under the command of Major John Howard. Mervin survived Pegasus Bridge, but was killed during the later fighting in Normandy, on 27 August 1944. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Fatouville-Grestain (Carbec) Graveyard, Normandy.

 

I. Cole, Rifleman, King's Royal Rifle Corps. This man cannot be identified.

Walter Evlyn Cooper, Captain, 64140, Welch Regiment. Walter was the son of James and Elizabeth Cooper, of Devonport. He married Lilian Victoria Anne Humphreys at Pembroke Dock in 1920. He served with the 1st Battalion, Welch Regiment, and was with the battalion in Crete when the Island was invaded by German paratroopers on 21 May 1941. Walter was killed in the ensuing heavy fighting, in the desperate attempt to save Crete from German occupation, on 27 May 1941. He was 45 years old, and is buried at Suda Bay War Cemetery, Crete.

 

Charles Frederick William Darbon, Lance Corporal, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Charles was born at Strood in 1914, the son of Charles and Ruth Darbon (nee Carter). His father was a CSM with the 1st SWB, and was killed at Ypres during the Great War on 31 October 1914. Charles married Married Edna V. Davies of Pembroke Dock in December 1937. He appears to have died in 1987, so his inclusion on the Pembroke Dock Memorial is a mystery.

 

Ernest Ron Darlington, Private, 6149590, The East Yorkshire Regiment. Ernest was the son of Thomas Arthur James Darlington and Lily Darlington (nee Jubb), of Pembroke Dock. He was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He served with the 2nd Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment. The battalion landed on Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1945, attached to the 3rd Division, and played a large part in the break out from Normandy. Ernest was killed in Normandy on 11 August 1944. He was 24 years old, and is buried at St. Charles de Percy War Cemetery, France.

 

Colin Lewis Davies, Sergeant, 1187719, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Colin was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He served with 227 Squadron, RAF during the war, which operated the Bristol Beaufighter, based at Malta. Whilst flying in his Beaufighter over the Mediterranean on 6 January 1943, Colin was shot down and killed. He is commemorated on Panel 8 of the Malta Memorial, Malta.

 

Daniel James Davies, Corporal, 2316786, Royal Corps of Signals. Daniel was the son of James and Anna Maria Davies of Pembroke Dock, and the husband of Elsie May Davies, of Enfield, Middlesex. He served with the 1st Armoured Division Signals, Royal Signals Corps. It landed in France as part of the BEF on 14 April 1940 and was evacuated on 16 June, having served south of the River Somme, isolated from the other British formations. For the rest of 1940 and up until 27 August 1941, the division was stationed in Britain on anti invasion duties, and later embarked for Egypt, landing on 13 November 1941. Daniel was killed at the First Battle of El Alamein on 3 July 1942. He was 38 years old, and is buried at El Alamein War Cemetery, Libya.

 

Eric Butler Davies, Serjeant, 4030951, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Eric was the son of Albert J. and Alice K. Davies of Oswestry, Shropshire. He married Rosa F. Bray, of Pembroke Dock in 1938. He served with the 2nd Battalion, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, which was attached to the 3rd Division. Eric landed at La Breche D'hermanville, on Normandy with the Battalion on D-Day, 6 June 1944. After heavy fighting, the beach was consolidated, and the following day saw several German counter-attacks. Eric was killed on D-Day plus one, 7 June 1944. He was 31 years old, and is buried at La Delivrande War Cemetery, Douvres, France.

 

Henry William Davies, Air Fitter, FAA/F 55017, Royal Navy. Henry was from Lawrenny, and was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He served as an Air Fitter with the Fleet Air Arm aboard the aircraft carrier HMS Courageous. Courageous was an old WW1 cruiser which had been converted into an aircraft carrier in 1924. She served with the Home Fleet, with 811 and 822 Squadrons aboard, equipped with the Fairey Swordfish. On 31 August 1939 she sailed to Portland and embarked the two squadrons, departing Plymouth on the evening of 3 September 1939 for an anti-submarine patrol in the Western Approaches. On the evening of 17 September 1939, she was on patrol off the coast of Ireland, when the German submarine U-29 fired three torpedoes at her, knocking out all electrical power, and she capsized and sank in 20 minutes with the loss of 519 of her crew. Henry was among the dead. He was 32 years old, and is commemorated on bay 1, panel 1 of the Lee-on-Solent Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Ronald Thomas Davies, Senior Master, Royal Navy. Ronald was the son of George Warren Davies and Mary Jane Davies, of Pembroke Dock. He was a Royal Naval regular, serving aboard the mighty battleship HMS Hood. When the mighty German battleship Bismarck sailed into the Atlantic in May 1941, Hood and the Prince of Wales were sent out to intercept her. On 24 May 1941, in a famous battle that only lasted eight minutes, an almighty explosion tore HMS Hood apart, sending her to the bottom of the sea with the loss of 1,415 of her crew of 1,418 men. Ronald was one of the dead. He was 42 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 46 of the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

F. Dean, Gunner, Royal Artillery. This man cannot be identified.

 

Thomas Arthur Dilworth, Private, 6895226, The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment). Thomas was born in London in 1914. He married Doreen May Howell whilst stationed in Pembroke Dock early in 1940, just prior to embarking for France to join the BEF. He served as a pre war regular with the 2nd Battalion, Royal East Kent Regiment. the retreat to Dunkirk, the Buffs were holding a line near Petegem, covering the BEF’s retreat to Dunkirk. Thomas was killed in action during an epic stand by his battalion on 27 May 1940. He was 26 years old, and is buried at Westoutre British Cemetery, Belgium. His widow Doreen married Ronald Couch the following year, and died at Pembroke Dock in 1997.

 

Edward Charles Donohoe, Lance-Serjeant, 827281, The King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Edward was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Donohoe of Pembroke Dock. He married Kathleen Doris Tucker of Kingsthorpe, Northampton in 1942. He served with the 2nd Battalion, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, which was attached to the 3rd Division, and landed with the battalion on the Normandy beaches on D-Day, 6 June 1944. After weeks of severe fighting in Normandy, Edward was killed on 22 July 1944. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Banneville-La-Campagne War Cemetery, France.

 

Frederick William Oliver Dunn, Corporal, 511852, Royal Air Force. Frederick was the son of William Robert Henry and Emily Jane Dunn. He married Irene Mildred Phillips of Pembroke Dock in 1933. He was killed at 4, Gwyther Street, Pembroke Dock during an air raid on 12 May 1941, alongside his Grandmother. Frederick was 29 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Geoffrey Stephen Earle, Sapper, 1868032, Royal Engineers. Geoffrey was the son of Stephen Earle, and Dora Frances Earle (nee Mould). His mother had died at sometime between the wars and his father married Ethel Thyra Blackler in 1933, before moving the family to Pembroke Dock. Geoffrey served with 17 Field Company, Royal Engineers, and was in France at the outbreak of war, as part of the BEF. Geoffrey was killed during the retreat to Dunkirk on 1 June 1940. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on Column 24 of the Dunkirk Memorial, France.

 

Norman Earnshaw, Flight Sergeant (Air Gunner), 655630, Royal Air Force. Norman does not look to be a true WW2 casualty, but he was born in 1922, the son of Albert Earnshaw and Rose Margaretta Earnshaw (Nee Gwyther). He served with 612 Squadron, Royal Air Force, and was reported missing in February 1944 after an operational flight over Germany. He returned to Britain after the war suffering from considerable wounds, and died at Pembroke in 1958, aged 35.

 

Ernest Claude Edwards, Sapper, 1873822, Royal Engineers. Ernest served as a regular soldier with the 17th Field Company, Royal Engineers, which moved to France with the BEF at the outbreak of war. He was killed during the retreat to Dunkirk on 30 May 1940, aged 21, and is buried at Veurne Communal Cemetery Extension, Belgium.

 

Albert Charles Evans, Chief Petty Officer, C/MX 60230, Royal Navy. Albert was born at Pennar in 1919, the son of Alfred and Annie Louisa Evans. The family later resided at Gillingham, Kent. Albert served with the Royal Navy aboard the Dido Class light cruiser HMS Naiad. She had seen action with the Home Fleet, before taking part in the Malta Convoys, and transferred to the Mediterranean Fleet. On 11 March 1942 Naiad was hunting an Italian Cruiser which had been reported as being damaged near Crete, when she was herself attacked, torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-565 with the loss of 82 lives. Albert was 22 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent. Albert does not appear to be commemorated locally.

 

Albert Edward Evans, Warrant Officer Class III (R.S.M.), 4180444, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Albert was the son of George and Annie Louisa Evans, of Everton, Lancashire. He married Gertrude Hitchings of Pembroke Dock in 1930. Albert served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, and was in France with the BEF at the outbreak of war. Albert was killed during the retreat to Dunkirk on 25 May 1940. He was 38 years old and is buried at St. Venant Communal Cemetery, France.

 

David Evans, Third Engineer, Fishing Fleet. David was the son of Will and Annie Evans, and the husband of Beatrice Evans, of Pembroke Dock. He served aboard the Fishing Vessel Exeter, a Lowestoft registered trawler. David was drowned when the trawler was lost at sea on 29 March 1941. He was 50 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 125 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

James Richard Evans, Fireman, Fishing Fleet. James was the son of William and Annie Evans. He served aboard the Fishing Vessel Respondo, a Hartlepool registered trawler. Respondo left Milford Haven on 11 September 1940 on a routine fishing trip, and was supposed to return a week later. However twenty days went by, and Respondo was never again seen, being declared lost at sea with all hands on 11 September 1940. It is most likely that she was attacked by German aircraft and sank. James was 43 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 128 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Stanley Lewis Evans, Corporal, 2322442, Royal Corps of Signals. Stanley was the son of Mathies and Elizabeth Evans, and the stepson of Frederick John Howells, of Pennar. He served with the Singapore Fortress Signals Company, Royal Corps of Signals. Stanley was taken prisoner when the Singapore garrison surrendered to the Japanese in December 1941, and he was taken into captivity at Changi Jail. He died in captivity on 13 February 1942, aged 23, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore. Stanley does not seem to be commemorated at Pembroke Dock.

 

William George Evans, Bombardier, 1108551, Royal Artillery. William was the son of John Maurice and Ruth Evans of Pembroke, and was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He married Selina Evans, of North Harrow, Middlesex. William served as a Bombardier with 455 Independent Light Battery, Royal Artillery. The Battery served in Burma during the war, and fought in terrible conditions. William probably became ill during July 1944, and was hospitalised in India. He died on 15 August 1944, aged 32, and is buried at Gauhati War Cemetery, India.

 

Albert Ernest Fairs, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy. Albert was born on 20 March 1891, the son of John and Elizabeth Fairs, of 86, Bush Street, Pembroke Dock. He had worked for the GWR at Whitland for several years prior to joining the Merchant Navy, and by 1940 was serving aboard the Newcastle registered tanker S.S. Cadillac. On 1 March 1941 Cadillac was en route from Aruba for Avonmouth carrying a cargo of 17,000 tons of aviation spirit when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-552, with the loss of 35 lives. Albert was 48 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Albert is not named on the Pembroke Dock memorial.

 

William Rowland John Forward, Electrical Artificer 4th Class, D/MX 49221, Royal Navy. William was the son of Frederick John Forward and Elizabeth Forward (nee Davies), of Pembroke Dock. He served aboard HMS Glorious, which had originally been built in 1915 as a Battlecruiser, but was later modified into an aircraft carrier in 1924, by removing all of her upper deck components. On 24 April 1940, Glorious and HMS Ark Royal sailed for Norway, to aid the British attempt to defend the country from German attack. She made several trips to Norway, bringing Gloster Gladiators and Hurricanes to aid in the defence of the country, but on 5 June 1940 the British began to evacuate Norway, and Glorious loaded up with aeroplanes and headed back to Scapa Flow. However on 8 June the carrier and her two escorts, the destroyers HMS Acasta and HMS Ardent, were intercepted by the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. The carrier and her escorts were sunk in two hours, roughly 280 nautical miles (510 km) west of Harstad. William was 23 years old when he died aboard HMS Glorious on 8 June 1940. He is commemorated on Panel 42 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Herbert William Fox, Lance Serjeant, 4032426, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Herbert was the son of Mark and Francis Fox, of Shrewsbury. He married Elsie Eileen Pinnegar of Pennar, Pembroke Dock in 1938. He served with the 2nd Battalion, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, which landed on the Normandy beaches on D-Day, 6 June 1944, as part of the 3rd Division. Herbert was killed during the fighting in the Reichswald on 1 March 1945. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Eli George, Lance Serjeant, 1872529, Royal Engineers. Eli was the son of Eli and Jane George of Pembroke Dock. He married Lilian Thorne of Dagenham, Essex in 1941. He served with 82 Assault Squadron, Royal Engineers, and landed on the Normandy beaches on D-Day, 6 June 1944. The task of 82 Squadron was to clear the beach of obstacles, and so Eli would have been one of the first men ashore that day. Eli was killed on D-Day, while his Squadron were clearing the way for 8th Armoured Brigade to cross the beaches. He was 26 years old, and is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, France.

 

Thomas Clifford Gibby, Third Officer, Merchant Navy. Thomas was the son of John and Sarah Gibby, of Pembroke Dock. He married Betty John of Llanddewi Velfrey. He served in the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Newton Pine, a Cardiff registered cargo steamer. On 15 October 1942, when on route from Hull for Halifax, she was torpedoed by U-410 and sunk with the loss of all her crew. Thomas was 31 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 73 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Denzil Norman Hugh Griffiths, Able Seaman, D/JX 348334, Royal Navy. Denzil was the son of Charles and Margaret Griffiths, of Pembroke Dock. He served in the Royal Navy aboard the Landing Craft H.M.L.C.S. (L) 258. Denzil was among 24 men killed when Landing Craft (L) 258 was sunk during Operation Infatuate, the landings at the Dutch Island of Walcheren, on 1 November 1944. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 86 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon. The operation claimed the lives of over 300 Royal Navy and Royal Marines personnel.

 

J. Griffiths, Private. This man cannot be identified.

 

Thomas Geoffrey Halse, Gunner, 5431913, Royal Artillery. Thomas was the son of Sidney John Halse and Edith Halse (nee Discombe), of Exeter. He married Phyllis Margaret Taylor of Pennar, Pembroke Dock in 1941. He served with 1 Battery, Heavy Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was a Coastal Defence unit. Thomas died on active service on 6 February 1942. He was 41 years old, and is buried at Scunthorpe (Brumby and Frodingham) Cemetery, Lincolnshire.

 

Charles William Hare, Second Engineer, Fishing Fleet. Charles was born on 4 April 1903, the son of Charles William Hare and Evelyn Mary Hare (nee Price). He married Edith Vera Annie Lloyd in 1938 and the couple lived at 19, Clarence Street, Pembroke Dock. Charles served as an engineer aboard the Fishing Trawler M85 (Ely). He was 41 years old when Ely was sunk after colliding with H.M. Canadian Corvette Trillium on 14 January 1945. None of the crew are commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Dennis Charles Harries, Fireman, Fishing Fleet. Dennis was the son of Thomas Harries and Ruby Francis Harries (nee Farmer), and the Grandson of Ada Honeybourne, of Pembroke Dock. He served in the Fishing Fleet aboard the Fishing Vessel Charmouth, which was based at Milford Haven. Dennis was killed when Charmouth struck a German mine in the Irish Sea on 14 November 1946. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 124 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Frederick Harris, Sergeant, 563782, Royal Air Force. Frederick was the son of William Henry and Emma Harris. He married Nesta Phillips of Pembroke Dock in 1939, and served with 228 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The squadron reformed on 15 December 1936 at RAF Pembroke Dock, and was initially equipped with a variety of aircraft including Short Singapore’s, a Supermarine Scapa, a Saro London and a Supermarine Stranraer. By the outbreak of war it had been re-equipped with the Short Sunderland, and moved to Egypt. Frederick was killed when his Sunderland was lost on 1 November 1940. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on Column 240 of the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

Thomas Herbert Hogg, Greaser, Merchant Navy. Thomas was the son of John Blakey Hogg and Evylyn Rosina Hogg (nee Walton), of South Shields. His father had served with the Royal Naval Reserve during WW1, and the family had lived at Pembroke Dock for some years. Thomas had married Mary Ellen Hogg of Middlesbrough in 1941. He served in the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Narragansett. Thomas died when Narrangansett was lost at sea on 25 March 1942. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 72 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Trevor John Hordley, Flying Officer (Pilot), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Trevor was the son of Frederick Hubert Hordley and Sarah Anne Hordley (nee Gibby), of Pembroke Dock. He was educated at Pembroke Dock County School and married Muriel M Hillyard in 1944. He served with 207 Squadron, RAF, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. On 7 July 1944, Lancaster ND567, EM-V, took off from RAF Spilsby, piloted by Trevor, bound for targets at St.Leu d'Esserent. On the morning of 8 July 1944 the Lancaster was shot down, and crashed on the edge of woods near Sérifontaine. Trevor and four other members of his crew were killed in the crash. All five men are buried in the National Cemetery, Marissel, Beauvais, France.

 

Leonard Cecil Hosken, Supply Assistant, D/MX 68535, Royal Navy. Leonard was the son of Cecil Henry and Eliza Mary Hosken, of Devonport. He married Evelyn May Bigrig at Plymouth in 1940, and Evelyn later lived at Pembroke Dock. He served in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Hecla. Hecla was a Destroyer Depot Ship launched in March 1940 and was operating in the Mediterranean during the Allied landings, when she was sunk off Casablanca on 12 November 1942 by U-515 with the loss of 279 crew, including Leonard. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 71 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Edward Charles Howard, Lieutenant, 72068, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Edward was the son of Louis and Elizabeth Jane Howard, of Plumstead, London. He married Doris Marian of 8, Argylle Street, Pembroke Dock later of Farnborough, Hampshire. Edward was commissioned into the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, and just after marrying Doris was posted to the Middle East. He died on 11 January 1942, aged 44, and is buried in Khartoum War Cemetery, Sudan. Edward is not named on the Pembroke Dock memorial.

 

Frank Clement Howells, Gunner, 1047556, Royal Artillery. Frank was the son of Eliza Howells, of 8, Kings Street, Pembroke Dock. He married Ivy Margery Derbyshire of Northampton in 1931. He served with 3 Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was attached to I Corps of the BEF in France in 1940. Frank survived the evacuation of Dunkirk, but died at Lincoln on 31 August 1940, aged 38. He is buried in Northampton (Kingthorpe) Cemetery, England. Frank is not named on the Pembroke Dock memorial.

 

Thomas George Humphreys, Trooper, 7933287, Royal Armoured Corps. Thomas was the son of William George and Elizabeth Humphreys, of 24, Clarence Street, Pembroke Dock. He married Dorothy Mary Davies of Paulsgrove, Portsmouth in 1936. He had served during the war with the Royal Armoured Corps, but died after the war, aged 35, on 11 September 1946. Thomas is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Clifford Allen Isaacs, Staff Serjeant, 7587640, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Clifford was the son of Reginald Allen Isaacs and Alice Isaacs (nee Parry), of Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He served in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and was posted to 5 Advanced Base Workshop in Cairo. Clifford died in hospital in Cairo on 14 May 1943, aged 26, and is buried at Heliopolis War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Aubrey Llewellyn James, Ordnance Artificer 1st Class, Royal Navy. Aubrey was the son of Thomas and Maud James, of 1, Gwyther Street, Pembroke Dock. He married Alice M Edwards at Pembroke Dock in 1922, and the couple lived at 8, Gwyther Street. He served in the Royal Navy aboard the destroyer HMS Gloucester. At the outbreak of war she was stationed in the Indian Ocean, but was posted to the Mediterranean in May 1940. She saw considerable action in the Mediterranean and in May 1941 formed part of a naval force acting against German military transports, which were bringing troops to Crete. On 22 May 1941, while in the Kithera Channel, about 14 miles north of Crete, she was attacked by German Stuka dive bombers and sank, with the loss of 722 men. Aubrey was one of the dead. He was 41 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 54 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

R. James, Sergeant, Royal Tank Regiment. This man cannot be identified.

 

Thomas George James, Petty Officer Steward, D/LX 20886, Royal Navy. Thomas was the son of Robert and Ellen James, of 12, King Street,  Pembroke Dock. He had served in the Royal Navy throughout the war and was on HMS Exeter during the Battle of the River Plate. After the armistice he was posted aboard the repair ship HMS Hecla. Thomas is listed as having died on 29 May 1946, aged 35. Thomas was accidentally killed when he was shot by a souvenir Luger pistol, while aboard a warship anchored off Bremerhaven. He must have been buried at sea, as he is commemorated on Panel 96 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon. His brother William Henry James had fallen earlier in the war. (Thanks to Leslie Rutledge for the information).

 

William Henry James, Leading Steward, D/LX 20290, Royal Navy. William was the son of Robert and Ellen James, of 12, King Street, Pembroke Dock. He married Flora Davies in 1929. He served in the Royal Navy, aboard the A Class destroyer, HMS Ardent. At the outbreak of WW2, Ardent carried out Escort Duties in the Channel, before joining Western Approaches Command at Liverpool. In March 1940 she moved to the North Sea, where she became an escort vessel for HMS Ark Royal, after the German invasion of Norway. On 8 June 1940, Ardent was detached from Ark Royal, and along with HMS Acasta were escorting the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious back to Scapa Flow, when the three ships were spotted by the German warships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. Ardent and Acasta laid a smokescreen to hide the trio, before launching an attack on the German ships. Despite coming under heavy fire from the more powerful German guns, Ardent bravely launched a torpedo attack. She suffered multiple hits, and capsized and sank with the loss of 10 officers and 142 men. Acasta and Glorious were also sunk. William was 32 years old when he died that day. He is commemorated on Panel 42 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon. His brother Thomas George James lost his life at sea after the end of hostilities in 1946. (Thanks to Leslie Rutledge for the information).

 

Charles Frederick Jelley, DFC, Flying Officer (Observer), 161812, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. (Pembroke). Charles was the son of Christopher James Jelley and Dorothy Ellis Jelley, of Pembroke. He was educated at Pembroke Dock County School, before joining the Royal Air Force, where he became an Observer with 635 Squadron, RAF, which was an elite Pathfinder unit.  Charles was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in the London Gazette of 15 November 1943. On 6 January 1945, Charles was serving as a mid-upper turret gunner aboard Lancaster PB-228, during a raid on Hanau, when it collided with another Lancaster above Grobaheim, Germany, and crashed with the loss of seven men. Charles was 21 years old, and is buried at Durnbach War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Albert Leonard John, Corporal, 3969337, South Staffordshire Regiment. Albert was the son of Albert Victor and Jennette John, of Pembroke Dock. He married Florence Harries Evans of Pembroke Dock in 1940. He served with the 1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, which fought in Burma against the Japanese. Albert died in Burma on 23 June 1944. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar.

 

James Kenneth John, Aircraftman 1st Class, Royal Air Force. Ken was the son of John George and Martha Anne John, of Pembroke Dock. He served during the war with the Royal Air Force, and died in Austria as part of the Army of Occupation on 19 May 1946. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Klagenfurt War Cemetery, Austria.

 

Francis Edward Johnson, Warrant Officer (Observer), 580492, Royal Air Force. Francis was the son of William Henry Johnson and Emily Gertrude Johnson (nee Corbett), of Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock School. He served with 40 Squadron, RAF, which was equipped with the Vickers Wellington, and was based in the Middle East. Francis died in Egypt on 18 March 1942. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Suez War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Aubrey Thomas Grenville Jones, Sergeant (Flight Engineer), 571686, Royal Air Force. Aubrey was born at Neyland in 1921, the son of Margaret Jones (nee Reynolds). He was educated at Pembroke Dock County School, prior to joining the Royal Air Force in 1937. Aubrey became a Flight Engineer with 460 RAAF Squadron, which flew the Avro Lancaster. On 28 April 1944, he was a member of the crew of Lancaster LL-906, which was on a mission from RAF Binbrook for Friedrichshafen, when it was intercepted and shot down by a German Night Fighter. Aubrey was among seven men killed aboard the Lancaster when it crashed in France. He was 23 years old, and is buried in a collective grave at Appenwihr Churchyard, France.

 

Hugh Jones, Flight Sergeant, 517519, Royal Air Force. Hugh was the son of Robert and Ann Jones, and the husband of Dorothy Blodwyn Jones, of Pembroke Dock. He served with 201 Squadron, RAF, which was a Coastal Command unit, equipped with the Short Sunderland. Hugh was killed when his Sunderland was lost at sea on 6 February 1942. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 75 of the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Christopher Gilbert Kelly, Lieutenant, 234840, Royal Artillery. Christopher was the son of Thomas and Margaret Kelly, of Pembroke Dock. He married Maud Charlotte Brandon of West Mersea, Essex in 1937. He served with 94 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. The Regiment served with the Guards Armoured Division, and saw action in North Africa and Italy before taking part in the Normandy invasion on D-Day, 6 June 1944. Christopher was killed on 15 August 1944 during the latter stages of the battle for Normandy. He was 31 years old, and is buried at St. Charles De Percy War Cemetery, France.

 

Thomas Albert Kennedy, Leading Aircraftman, 521902, Royal Air Force. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Dorothy Kennedy, and the husband of Ivy Joyce Kennedy (nee Lewis), of Pennar, Pembrokeshire. He served with 210 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a Coastal Command Squadron, based at RAF Oban, equipped with the Consolidated Catalina. Thomas died when his Catalina was lost at sea on 27 December 1940. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 23 of the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Ernest George Lewis, Sergeant (Air Bomber), 1585091, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Ernest was the son of William Ewart Lewis and Sadie Gwendoline Lewis (nee Silcox), of Pembroke Dock. He was sent to South Africa to Air Training School from November 1942 until July 1943 when he became a Sergeant and came home to join 626 Squadron, which was a heavy bomber squadron based at RAF Wickenby, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. On the morning of 23 June 1944, Ernest was aboard Lancaster LM102, Serial UM-Z2, which was part of a force tasked with bombing Rheims, when the Lancaster crashed in farm land near the village of Belloy, killing all the crew. Ernest was 21 years old, and is buried at Belloy Churchyard, Oise, France, alongside his fellow crew members.

 

George Frederick Lewis, Lance Bombardier, 797656, Royal Horse Artillery. George was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Lewis, and the husband of Minnie Lewis. He served with the 5th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery. In 1940 the Regiment formed part of the British Expeditionary Force to France and after Dunkirk moved to North Africa, where it joined 7th Armoured Division. George would have seen action in North Africa, before taking part in the invasion of Sicily, and then Italy in 1943. He was killed in Italy on 22 October 1943, aged 31, and is buried at Minturno War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Thomas Lineton, Private, 4032085, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Thomas was the son of Tom and Alice Lineton, of Oakengates, Shropshire. He married Alice Lilian Bishop of Pembroke Dock in 1938. He had served during the war with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, and died after the end of hostilities, on 29 December 1945. Thomas was 35 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Arthur Sidney Makin, Trooper, 841906, Royal Armoured Corps. Arthur was the son of Arthur Sidney and Selina Beatrice Makin, of Birkdale, Lancs. His father was killed in France on 30 September 1918 and his mother died in 1927, so nine year old Arthur was adopted by his aunt Ethel Rabbetts and her husband Albert Edward Rabbetts, of 21, London Road, Pembroke Dock. He had worked for the GWR at Neyland prior to the war and served with the Pembroke RGA (Territorials) before enlisting into the army. He served with the 1st Royal Tank Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps. Arthur fought in North Africa, and was killed during the First Battle of El Alamein on 3 July 1942, just weeks after Tobruk had fallen to the Afrika Korps. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on Column 23 of the Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

 

David Vincent Malpass, Sergeant, 564042, Royal Air Force. David was the son of James Power Malpass and Catherine Maud Malpass, of Pontypridd. He married Irene Constance Phelps Thomas of Pembroke Dock at Salisbury in 1939. He served as an Observer with 218 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a bomber unit, equipped with the Bristol Blenheim. On 13 July 1940 David was flying in a navigational exercise aboard Blenheim IV, Serial R3597, when it struck a tree and crashed in Bedfordshire, killing all three crew members. David was 26 years old when he died that day, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery. David does not seem to be commemorated locally.

 

Thomas Gwyn James Mathias, Lieutenant (E), Royal Navy. Thomas was from Pembroke Dock, and was the Adopted son of Thomas Lloyd Mathias R.C.N.C. and Frances Ann Mathias, of Combe Down, Bath, Somerset. He served with the Royal Navy at HMS President, a naval gunnery school. Thomas died on 23 October 1940, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Vivian Foyle Maynard, Leading Aircraftman, 570306, Royal Air Force. Vivian was the son of Frederick C. Maynard and Annie E. Maynard (nee Evans), of Pembroke Dock. He served with the Royal Air Force, and was based at Singapore. Vivian was taken prisoner when Singapore was captured by the Japanese on 15 February 1942. He remained at Singapore as a Prisoner of War until November 1943, when he was part of a party of 640 men that boarded the Japanese Transport Suez Maru, bound for Java. Suez Maru set sail from Port Amboina but while entering the Java Sea on 29 November 1943 was torpedoed by the American submarine USS Bonefish. The ship started to list as water poured into the holds drowning hundreds, many managed to escape the holds and swam away from the sinking ship, but were machine gunned in the water by a Japanese escort ship. Vivian was one of the men killed that day. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on Column 427 of the Singapore Memorial.

 

Patrick Gerald McGrath, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1081837, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Patrick was educated at Pembroke Dock School. He served as an Air Gunner with 214 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a bomber squadron, equipped with the Short Stirling. On 30 May 1942 Patrick was aboard Stirling W7534, which took off from RAF Stradishall as part of a 1,000 bomber force, destination Cologne. On the return leg of the journey, on the morning of 31 May 1942, it seems that Patrick’s Stirling collided with a Wellington near Monchengladbach, and both bombers blew up, killing all aboard. Patrick is buried alongside his fellow crewmen at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany.

 

John McKenzie, Sergeant (Flight Engineer), 573805, Royal Australian Air Force. John was the son of John Knox McKenzie and Lily Elizabeth McKenzie (nee Thomas), of 31, Laws Street, Pembroke Dock. He served with 460 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force, which was a heavy bomber squadron, equipped with the Avro Lancaster. John’s mother Lily, and his two younger brothers Alexander and Cyril were killed at their home at 31, Laws Street, Pembroke Dock during the massive Air Raid on the morning of 12 May 1941, which wrought havoc in the town. John was killed when his Lancaster, Serial JB657 hit a tree and crashed into an ammunition dump at RAF Market Stanton while returning from a bombing raid on Berlin on 16 December 1943, killing all the crew. John was 21 years old and is buried at Cambridge City Cemetery, England. It must have been a massive blow to his father John Knox, to have lost his entire family within two years.

 

Harry Meakin, Warrant Officer Class III (R.S.M.), 5722108, Dorsetshire Regiment. Harry was the son of Thomas Summers Meakin and Alice Meakin of Mortlake, Surrey. He married Gwendoline Frances Jones in 1930, and the couple later lived at Pembroke Dock. Harry served prior to the war with the 2nd Battalion, Dorsetshire, and was in France at the outbreak of war with the BEF. Harry was killed in action at Ypres during the retreat to Dunkirk on 25 May 1940. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Ypres Town Cemetery Extension, Belgium.

 

Ronald Walter Millard, Corporal, 2028735, Royal Engineers. Ronald was the son of Arthur John and Minnie Kate Millard. He married Mildred Martha Scourfield of Pennar, in 1938. He served with 102 Field Company, Royal Engineers, which was attached to the 8th Army. Ronald fought in North Africa and Sicily, but was killed during the landings at Anzio on 27 June 1944. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Beach Head War Cemetery, Anzio, Italy.

 

Albert Edward Morgan, Warrant Officer Class II (C.S.M.), 6456273, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Albert was the son of Solomon and Caroline Morgan; husband of Phyllis Morgan, of Pembroke Dock. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, and was in France at the outbreak of war, serving with the BEF. Albert was killed in action during the retreat to Dunkirk on 31 May 1940. He was 33 years old, and is buried at De Panne Communal Cemetery, De Panne, Belgium.

 

William Henry Morgan, Private, 32609, South Wales Borderers. William was the son of William Henry and Phoebe Morgan, and the husband of Laura Winifred Morgan, of Pembroke Dock. He served with the 30th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, on home service. William died on active service on 1 February 1943. He was 45 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Alfred John Morris, Gunner, 1722089, Royal Artillery. Alfred was the son of Frederick and Alice Morris, of Pembroke. He served with 3 Maritime Regiment, Royal Artillery. He served as a gunner aboard a merchant vessel, but the identity of this cannot yet be traced. Alfred was possibly lost overboard a vessel, as he is listed as Missing Presumed Killed on 17 June 1945. No ship was lost that day. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 82 of the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

Eilwyn Rees Morris, Leading Aircraftman, 536055, Royal Air Force. Eilwyn was the son of John Lewis Morris and Margaret Ann Morris (nee Evans), of Pembroke. He married Margaret Anne Kavanagh of Pembroke Dock in 1939. He served with 210 Squadron, RAF, which was a Coastal Command Squadron, equipped with the Short Sunderland. Eilwyn was killed when his Sunderland was lost at sea on 29 June 1940. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 23 of the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Ronald John Mumford, Sergeant (Pilot), 655837, Royal Air Force. Ronald was the son of Percy Sterndale Mumford and Ada Mumford, of Louth, Lincolnshire. He served as a Pilot with 15 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Equipped with Fairey Battle light bombers, the squadron flew to France in September 1939 as part of No. 71 Wing, Advanced Air Striking Force. After returning to the UK, the following year it re-equipped first with Bristol Blenheims and again with Vickers Wellingtons before becoming one of the first Short Stirling bomber squadrons. Ronald was killed on a raid on 16 September 1942, aged 26. He is commemorated on Panel 90 of the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Norman Henry Owen, Leading Aircraftman (Pilot U/T), 1101265, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Norman was the son of Gwilym Ernest and Gwendoline Owen, and was educated at Pembroke Dock County School, before the family moved to Rhyl. He was serving with the Royal Air Force at the outbreak of war, and was training as a pilot when he was killed on 10 December 1940. Norman was 26 years old, and is buried at Rhyl Church Cemetery, Wales.

 

Peter William Pask, Serjeant, 1865324, Royal Engineers. Peter was the son of George and Mary Pask, of Aylesbury. He married Ethel May Stephens of Pembroke Dock in 1935. He served with 66 Field Company, Royal Engineers. Peter was killed during the breakout from the Normandy beach-head on 14 June 1944. He was 37 years old, and is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, France.

 

Joseph Alfred William Payton, Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. Joseph was the son of Joseph Fletcher Payton and Hannah Prudence Payton, of 68, Gwyther Street, Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock School. He served in the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Ullapool, a West Hartlepool registered freighter. Joseph died when Ullapool struck a parachute dropped mine in the River Mersey on 13 March 1941 and sank. He was 32 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 113 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

George Richard Phelps, Flight Lieutenant (Pilot), 150236, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. George was the son of Joseph George and Phebe Jane Phelps, of Pembroke, and was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School. He served with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, in 166 Squadron, which was a heavy bomber Squadron, flying Lancaster bombers after 1943. George was killed when his aircraft was shot down over Germany on the 1st March, 1945. He was just 22 years old, and is buried at Durnbach War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Idris Sefton Phillips, Guardsman, 2738729, Welsh Guards. Idris was the son of Arthur Phillips and Amelia Phillips (nee Williams), of Pembroke Dock. He served with the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards. Idris landed in Normandy with the Welsh Guards on D-Day. They were attached to the Guards Armoured Division, and took part in the break out from Normandy. After the battle of Normandy the Welsh Guards had a short rest until 31 August 1944 when the advance was resumed.  On the 1st September the 1st Battalion re-entered Arras, the first troops to reach the City just as they had been the last to leave in 1940. On 3 September 1944 the Battalion reached Brussels, and with Antwerp also falling, the decision was made to push on and try and secure the bridgehead over the northern Rhine. The Welsh Guards Group pressed on the Albert Canal at Beeringen where the bridge had been partially destroyed. Under heavy fire the Welsh Guards crossed, they forced their way through Helchteren and on towards Hechtel where they were held up by anti tank fire.  The Battalion attacked Hechtel on 7 September but after repeated assaults did not capture it until 12 September. Idris was killed at Hechtel on 10 September 1944. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Leopoldsburg War Cemetery, Belgium.

 

William Ashley Phillips, Engineman, LT/X 6128ES, Royal Naval Reserve. William was from Lewis Street, Pembroke Dock, and served with the Royal Naval Reserve (Patrol Service), aboard H.M. Trawler Pelton. She had been requisitioned in August 1939 and converted to minesweeper. After conversion she took part in telephone cable cutting operation between Germany and Britain in the North Sea, and on 23 December 1940 was torpedoed and sank by the German E-boat S-28 off Great Yarmouth. William was killed during the sinking. He is commemorated on Panel 3 of the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

William Arthur Pocock, Warrant Officer, 335622, Royal Air Force. William was the son of William George and Agnes Pocock, and the husband of Ida Pocock, of Pennar, Pembroke Dock. He served with the Royal Air Force during the war, and died on active service on 21 July 1943. William was 39 years old, and is buried at Lambourne (St. Mary and All Saints) Churchyard, Essex.

 

Ronald George Powell, Private, 14552327, Dorsetshire Regiment. Ronald was the son of Frederick and Louisa Ellen Powell, of Pennar, Pembroke Dock. He served with the 1st Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment, which was attached to the 50th (Northumbrian) Division. The Division landed on Gold Beach, Normandy, on D-Day, 6 June 1944. They then took part in the breakout from the beaches over the coming weeks. Ronald was killed during the latter stages of the breakout, on 11 August 1944. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Tilly-Sur-Seulles War Cemetery, France.

 

John Stephen Power, Sapper, 1877408, Royal Engineers. John served with the Royal Engineers. Very little is known about him, except that he died on 10 October 1940, aged 19, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Arthur Eveleigh Mervyn Prickett, Flight Sergeant (Observer), 366382, Royal Air Force. Arthur was the son of William Charles and Maud Prickett of 23, Gwyther Street, Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock School. He married Dorothy Helen Pike, of West Molesey, Surrey, in 1937. Little is known of his service, but he served in the Middle East with the Royal Air Force, and died there on 6 May 1941, aged 31. Arthur is buried at Habbaniya War Cemetery, Iraq. Habbaniya was a peace-time Royal Air Force station, maintained under the Anglo-Iraqi treaty of 1930 which permitted a British base west of the Euphrates, and the permanent Headquarters of the R.A.F. in Iraq.

 

Sidney George Prickett, Chief Engine Room Artificer, C/MX 47331, Royal Navy. Sidney was the son of John and Emily Harriet Prickett of Church House, Albion Square, Pembroke Dock, and the husband of Catherine Prickett, of Dunfermline. He served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Liverpool, a Town Class Light Cruiser. During the Second World War, Liverpool operated variously with the naval stations in the East Indies and China and with the Mediterranean and Home fleets. She instigated a diplomatic incident with Japan in January 1940 when she intercepted and boarded the liner Asama Maru off the coast of Japan. Liverpool later fought in the battles of the Espero Convoy and Calabria, the Arctic Convoys, and Operation Harpoon during the Malta Convoys. Seriously damaged in two attacks by torpedo bombers, Liverpool gained four battle honours for her service. Sidney was killed aboard Liverpool during an aerial attack on 14 June 1942 during Operation Harpoon. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 60 of the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

Michael Rees, Sergeant, 637154, Royal Air Force. Michael was the son of Trevor James Rees and Margaret Rees (nee Meaney), of Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock School. He served with 224 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a Coastal Command Squadron, equipped at first with the Hudson, based at RAF Leuchars. Michael was killed when his Hudson was lost at sea on 8 September 1940. He was 20 years old and is commemorated on Panel 18 of the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

William Thomas Rees, Carpenter, Merchant Navy. William was the son of William and Ann Rees, and the husband of M. E. Rees, of Pembroke Dock. He served in the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Hollinside, a Newcastle-On-Tyne registered vessel. William was killed when Hollinside was torpedoed and sank by a German U-Boat on 3 September 1942. He was 49 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 57 of the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Leonard Arnold Roberts, Sapper, 1867275, Royal Engineers. Leonard was the husband of Elizabeth Eleanor Roberts, of Pembroke Dock. He served with 238 Field Company, Royal Engineers in North Africa. Leonard was killed in North Africa on 18 June 1943. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on the Medjez-El-Bab Memorial, Tunisia.

 

William John Cephas Rouse, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of William and Katherine Rouse, of Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock Grammar School, before entering University at London, where he graduated B.S.c. He was the husband of Mary Rouse, of Hakin, Milford Haven. William served in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Spurwing, a Royal Naval Air Station at Sierra Leone. William died at Sierra Leone on 15 February 1944. He was 33 years old, and is buried at Freetown (King Tom) Cemetery, Sierra Leone.

 

Peter Argent Saunders, Lieutenant, 217639, Army Air Corps. Peter was educated at Pembroke Dock County School. He was commissioned into the Rifle Brigade on 15 November 1941, and on 3 January 1943 volunteered to serve with the Army Air Corps, joining D Company, 10th Battalion, Parachute Regiment. He saw his first action during the Italian Campaign in 1943, when he was Mentioned in Despatches for his bravery. He returned to Britain prior to the invasion of Normandy, and took part in Operation Market Garden in September 1944, landing with his battalion at Arnhem on 17 September 1944, in command of D Company. Peter was killed in action during a heavy German attack at Oosterbeek on 22 September 1944, aged 24, and is buried at Arnhem Oosterbeek War Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

George Robert Skelton, Corporal, 636765, Royal Air Force. George was the son of John Robert and Florence Mary Skelton, of Angle. He was serving in Lancashire with the Royal Air Force when he married Irene A. Shepherd in 1940, shortly before embarking for the Far East. Irene then moved to Pembroke Dock. George was taken prisoner by the Japanese at some time during their capture of Hong Kong and Singapore. George was taken back to Japan to be used as forced labour, and was detained at Tokyo Number 12 Camp. George became ill with dysentery, and died on 5 December 1942. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Yokohama War Cemetery, Japan.

 

George Gordon Smith, DCM, MM, Warrant Officer Class I (R.S.M.), 1028413, Royal Artillery. George was the son of George William and Catherine Smith, and the husband of Annie Christina Smith, of Pembroke Dock. George had served in the Great War, and had won the Distinguished Conduct Medal and Military Medal for his bravery. He served again in World War Two as RSM in the Royal Artillery, and died on 9 September 1945, aged 60. He is buried at Chandlers Ford (Pine Road) Cemetery, Hampshire.

 

Ronald John Sobey, Guardsman, 2616650, Grenadier Guards. Ronald was the son of Alice Maud Sobey, of Communal Row, Pembroke Dock. His mother married Frank Cox, a soldier stationed at Pembroke Dock with the Royal Welch Fusiliers, in 1920, and the family then moved from the area. Ronald married Barbara Daphne North, of Hampstead, London, in 1942, prior to embarking for North Africa with the newly formed 5th Battalion, Grenadier Guards. The battalion took part in the North African campaign before joining the forces which took part in the invasion of Italy. Ronald was killed at Anzio on 25 January 1944, aged 24. He is buried in Anzio War Cemetery, Italy. Ronald does not appear to be commemorated locally.

 

Peter Richie Strachan, Second Hand, LT/JX 215886, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Peter was the son of James Ritchie Strachan and of Magdaline Crawford Strachan. He married Jestina Evelyn Hill of Pennar in 1932. He served with the Royal Naval patrol Service aboard HM Trawler Loch Inver. Peter was killed when Loch Inver struck a mine off Harwich on 22 September 1940. He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 1 of the Lowestoft Naval Memorial.

 

Reginald Heber Thomas, A.F.C., Squadron Leader, 43825, Royal Air Force. Reginald was the son of Charlie and Alice Amelia Thomas, of 9, Lewis Street, Pembroke Dock. He was an accomplished athlete, and had ran the 1500 metres in two Olympic Games, at Amsterdam in 1928 and at Los Angeles in 1932. He joined the Royal Air Force before the war, and trained as a Pilot, rising to the rank of Squadron Leader. On 8 June 1944 Reginald was gazetted with the Air Force Cross. He was killed on 14 March 1946 when piloting a Lancaster from RAF Aston Down, which lost power and crashed near Chalford. He was 39 years old and is buried at Bath (Haycombe) Cemetery, England.

 

Talfryn Thomas, Private, 6299566, Royal Army Pay Corps. Talfryn was the son of Thomas Daniel and Mary Thomas. He married Winifred Anne Edwards, of Pembroke Dock, in 1939. He was a Schoolmaster prior to the war, then served with the Royal Army Pay Corps. Talfryn died near Battle, Sussex on 29 October 1947, aged 33, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

William Edwin Thomas, Chief Shipwright, P/MX. 53289, Royal Navy. William was the son of David and Jane Thomas, of Pembroke Dock, and the husband of Mary Ann Thomas, of Pembroke Dock. He served in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Penelope, an Arethusa Class Light Cruiser. She saw service in the Mediterranean during the war, and on 18 February 1944, Penelope was leaving Naples to return to the Anzio area when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-410 and sank. 415 of the crew, including the captain, went down with the ship, but there were 206 survivors. William survived the war, but died as a result on 19 April 1946. He was 56 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Sidney Victor Tucker, Engine Room Artificer 4th Class, D/MX 51288, Royal Navy. Sidney was known as Victor, and was the elder son of Sidney William Tucker and Elizabeth Jane Tucker (nee Gunn), of Pembroke Dock. His mother Elizabeth died in 1924, and his father married Sarah Jean Davies, who raised Victor, his brother, and the couples own daughter, Eileen. Victor served in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Repulse, an old Renown Class Battleship, which had been launched in 1916. She served during the evacuation of Norway in 1940, and Repulse returned to convoy protection until January 1941, when she took part in the hunt for the German battlecruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. In May, she took part in the chase of Bismarck. She then operated with the Home Fleet until August 1941, when she transferred to Cape Town, South Africa, and in October, she was transferred to India, arriving on 28 October. She was then detached to the Far East, where she was sunk by Japanese aircraft while part of Force Z on 10 December 1941, alongside the more modern HMS Prince of Wales. Victor was 22 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on Panel 51 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Frederick Richard Waite, Sergeant, A/36, Royal Canadian Armoured Corps. Frederick was the son of Thomas and Mary Waite, of Pembroke Dock, and the husband of Mary Isabelle Waite, of Barrie, Ontario, Canada. He served with the 1st Hussars, 6th Armoured Regiment, Royal Canadian Armoured Corps. Frederick landed on Juno Beach on D-Day, 6 June 1944, and was killed in action five days into the battle of Normandy, on 11 June 1944. He was 38 years old, and is commemorated on Panel 19 of the Bayeux Memorial, France.

 

Leonard E. S. Waymouth,  Bombardier, 864266, Royal Artillery. Leonard was the son of George Frederick and Florance May Waymouth, of Bufferland, Pembroke Dock. He served during the war with 9 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. The Regiment fought in Burma with the 20th Indian Division, but Leonard died before embarking overseas, on 7 September 1941. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Eric Llewellyn Williams, Pilot Officer (Air Bomber), 118605, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Eric was the son of David Williams and M. Gwen Williams (nee Davies), of Pembroke Dock, and was educated at Pembroke Dock School. He died on 15 June 1942, aged 23, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery.

 

Phillip Walter Winter, Leading Aircraftman, 1046282, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Phillip was the son of Walter Ernest Winter and Ruth Winter (nee Churchill), and was educated at Pembroke Dock School, before the family moved to Gowerton, Glamorgan. Phillip enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, and was sent to Alabama, USA, as part of the Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Phillip was killed in Alabama on 11 April 1942 during a flying accident. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Montgomery (Oakwood) Cemetery Annexe, Alabama.

DONATIONS. If you find this website of use, please think about donating to help cover the costs of the huge amount of work and the continual costs of keeping the website on-line. Donations can be made using the Paypal link below, or by contacting the author via the Contact page.

Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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