West Wales War Memorial Project West Wales War Memorial Project  

Tenby WW2 Memorial

Tenby is one of the most attractive towns in West Wales, which can be seen by the number of visitors each summer. The town has a long history, with its castle being in a prominent position overlooking the sea, and the ancient town walls still standing. As a popular beauty spot in Victorian times, Tenby played host to a number of important families, and this can be seen in the large proportion of Officers on the War Memorial, which is sited at Trafalgar Gardens. Many Thanks to Les Nixon for his much appreciated photos of the War Memorial panels from which the names of the fallen were taken. This page commemorates the fallen of the town during World War Two.

Tenby War Memorial, World War Two, 1939-1945

 

William Donald Allies, Flight Lieutenant, 41978, Royal Air Force. William was the son of William Kenneth and Marguerite Allies. He married Kathleen Marjorie Harman, of Tenby, in 1939. William served with 214 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Boeing Flying Fortress, and flew on radio counter-measure missions, detecting and jamming enemy radio and radar equipment. William was killed when his aircraft was lost over the sea on 22 March 1945. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. William is not commemorated at Tenby.

Bernard Ollin Badham, Stoker 2nd Class, D/KX. 164530, Royal Navy. Bernard was the son of William Ollin Badham and Doris Mary Badham, of Saundersfoot, and served with the Royal Navy aboard H.M.L.C.S. (L) 255. This was a Landing Craft, which was designated His Majesty's Landing Craft Support (Small), No. 255. Bernard sadly died on 17 October 1943, aged just 20, and is buried at Saundersfoot (Bethesda) Presbyterian Church of Wales Chapelyard. His brother Geoffrey also fell.

Geoffrey David Badham, Boy 1st Class, D/JX.171749, Royal Navy. Geoff was the son of William Ollin Badham and Doris Mary Badham, of Saundersfoot, and served in the Royal Navy, aboard HMS Maori. Maori was a Tribal Class destroyer that had been launched on 2 September 1937. She was involved in the pursuit of the Bismarck, and served with the 4th Cruiser Squadron, which was part of the Mediterranean Fleet, at the Battle of Cape Bon, off the coast of Tunisia during December, 1941. Geoffrey may have been injured during the Battle, as he died just days later at Alexandria, on 30 December 1941, aged just 17, and is buried at Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery. The Maori was finally sunk while anchored at Malta on 12 February 1942, when she went down with the loss of one crew member. His brother Bernard also fell.

Kenneth Humphrey Bancroft, Captain, Malay States Defence Force. Kenneth served with the Malay States Defence Force (Kedah Volunteer Force), and was taken prisoner by the Japanese during their invasion of Thailand and Burma. He was sent to work on the infamous Thailand to Burma Railway, made famous by the Bridge on the River Kwai, and died in captivity on 22 December 1942. He was 37 years old, and is buried at Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, Thailand.

 

Raymond Bloch, Sergeant Major, Belgian Forces. Raymond was born in Belgium in 1904, and had been among the Belgian soldiers who had escaped from Dunkirk in May 1940. He was based at Penally when he met and married Kathleen James, of Upper Frog Street, Tenby in 1941. Raymond was then posted to London, and was on duty there when he was killed in an air raid in 1944. Kathleen died in 2002, having never remarried. Raymond is not commemorated at Tenby.

David Robert Booker, Sergeant (Air Bomber), 1413457, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David served with 156 Squadron, RAF, which was part of the elite Pathfinder Force, armed with the Avro Lancaster heavy bomber. David was just taking part in his third mission when his Lancaster, serial EE118, took off from Warboys on 29 September 1943, bound for Bochum. The crew found their target and returned home, but sadly crashed near Downham Market, Norfolk on the return leg, killing most of the crew, including David. His body was taken back to Tenby, where he was laid to rest at St. Mary’s Church Cemetery.

Geoffrey Hugh Bowen, Flying Officer (Pilot), 161261, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Geoffrey was the son of Percival and Mary A. Bowen (nee Smith), of West Cross, Swansea. He was educated at Tenby Council School and at Greenhill School prior to enlisting into the Royal Air Force. Geoffrey received a commission as a Pilot Officer on 27 October 1943. He was killed in an aeroplane crash at Melton Mowbray on 13 May 1944, aged 22, and is buried at Swansea (Oystermouth) Cemetery. Geoffrey is not commemorated on the main Tenby War Memorial, but at both his former Schools.

Ivor Henton Brace, Civilian Air Raid Victim, Auxiliary Fire Service. Ivor was the son of John and Mary Brace, of Knightson Lake, New Hedges, Tenby. He lived at 6 Cornwall Mews, London, where he served with the Auxiliary Fire Service. Ivor was killed at Elvaston Place, London, during an air raid on 11 May 1941. He was 27 years old.

Harold Felix Brumell, Ordinary Signalman, C/JX 176257, Royal Navy. Harold was the son of Felix Harold and Jane Brumell, of Walmer, Kent. He was educated at Tenby Council School and at Greenhill School prior to working for H.M. Customs and Excise. At the outbreak of war, Harold enlisted into the Royal Navy, where he served aboard HM Trawler Waveflower. Harold was among 14 men lost when Waveflower was sunk after striking a mine off Suffolk on 22 October 1940. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent. Harold is not commemorated on the main Tenby War Memorial, but at both his former Schools.

William Francis Collister Clague, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1070408, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of William and Helena Clague, and the Husband of Constance Gertrude Clague, of Tenby. He served with 460 (Royal Australian Air Force) Squadron, RAF, based at RAF Binbrook, and equipped with the Lancaster heavy bomber. William’s last flight was on 29 May 1943, when his Lancaster took off from Binbrook, bound for Wuppertal. His Lancaster must have been shot down over Germany the following morning, as William was killed on 30 May 1943, and is buried at Rheinberg War Cemetery, Kamp Lintfort, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany.

 

Hugh Anthony Stapledon Cotterill, Captain, IA/1141, 13th Frontier Force Rifles. Hugh was the son of Major Hugh Stapledon Cotterill, M.C., and Florence Marjorie Cotterill, of Tenby. He was commissioned into the Indian Army on 13 January 1940, and served with the 13th Frontier Force Rifles. Hugh fought with his battalion in the Burmese campaign. He was killed on 7 March 1942, aged 22, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar. Hugh is not commemorated at Tenby. The photograph below has been kindly supplied by Tony Beck.

Eric Henry Clark, Cabin Boy, Merchant Navy. Eric was born at Narberth in 1922, the son of Robert Charles Clark and Clara Elizabeth Elderton Clark. Robert had moved the family to Tenby during the Great War, where he was an instructor with the local Royal Garrison Artillery. Eric was educated at Greenhill School, before joining the Merchant Navy, and served aboard S.S. Mill Hill, a Newcastle-on-Tyne registered cargo vessel. On 16 August 1940 Mill Hill left Halifax, Nova Scotia as a member of convoy HX-66A laden with pig iron and scrap steel, bound for Middlesbrough. Early in the morning of 30 August 1940, she was 58 miles off Cape Wrath in the north of Scotland, when she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-32, sinking within a few minutes with the loss of all hands. Eric was just 18 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated alongside his fellow crew-members on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Lionel Elderton Clark, Assistant Cook, 118385, Naval Auxiliary Personnel (Merchant Navy). Lionel was born in Sussex in 1916, the son of Robert Charles Clark and Clara Elizabeth Elderton Clark. Robert had moved the family to Tenby during the Great War, where he was an instructor with the local Royal Garrison Artillery. Lionel was educated at Tenby Council School and Greenhill School, before joining the Merchant Navy, and served aboard HMS Jervis Bay as an Assistant Cook. Jervis Bay was a liner which had been converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser in August 1939. On 5 November 1940, she was the sole escort for the 37 ship Convoy HX-84 from Halifax, Nova Scotia to Britain, when the convoy encountered the Pocket Battleship Admiral Scheer. The convoy scattered, and Jervis Bay set a course straight towards the German warship to draw its fire. Jervis Bay was hopelessly outmatched, and was sunk in the engagement. Lionel was killed in the sinking that day. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Liverpool Naval Memorial. His brother, Eric Henry Clark also fell.

William Robert Frederick Creese, Lance Bombardier, 858954, Royal Artillery. William was the son of Stephen and Florence Creese, and the Husband of Elisabeth Ann Creese, of Tenby. He served with 17 Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery, which fought in North Africa, before taking part in the invasion of Italy. William was killed in Italy on 3 May 1945. He was 31 years old, and is buried at Bologna War Cemetery, Italy.

Thomas Edmund Cremer, Lieutenant, Royal Marines. Thomas was born on 8 January 1912, the son of Francis Woodrow Cremer and Fanny Georgina Cremer, of Swannington, Norfolk. He married Nancy Veronica Fulton at Paddington in 1937. Thomas was commissioned as Second Lieutenant with the Royal Marines on 11 August 1941, and served with the Royal Marine Signal Division, being promoted to Lieutenant within months. He was killed during an accident on 10 July 1942, aged 30. He is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery. Thomas is not commemorated at Tenby.

Richard Charles Luke Cummins, 1652396, Sergeant (Air Gunner), Royal Air Force. Richard was the son of Richard Cornelius and Mary Margaret Cummins, of Nailsea, Somerset, and served with 90 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The Squadron flew the Short Stirling III heavy bomber, based at RAF Wratting Common. Richard was killed during a raid over Germany on 23 September 1943. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Hanover War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Dewi Madoc Davies, Sergeant, 1021734, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Dewi was the son of the Revd. David Davies and Catherine Ann Davies, of Saundersfoot. He was educated at Greenhill School, before enlisting into the Royal Air Force, and joined 228 Squadron, which operated the Short Sunderland, and was based at RAF Pembroke Dock. On 13 June 1943, Dewi was a crewman aboard Sunderland DV-967 when she spotted a surfaced German Submarine, U564, and attacked her. Although badly damaging the U-Boat, the Sunderland was shot down, and crashed, killing all eleven of the crewmen aboard. Dewi was just 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. Dewi is not commemorated on the main Tenby War Memorial, but at his former School.

 

William Karl Davies, DSM, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of William and Caroline Davies, of Tenby, and the Husband of Emma Davies, of Brixton Hill. He had served in the Royal Navy for over 40 years by the outbreak of WW2, and had been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal during the Great War. William was a Freeman of Tenby. He was based in Cornwall when he died on 17 July 1943, aged 61. William is buried at Lambeth (Tooting) Cemetery, London. William is not commemorated at Tenby.

Kenneth Arthur Diment, Craftsman, 7588455, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Kenneth was the son of Captain John Bennett Diment and Winnifred Mabel Diment of Tenby. He served during the war with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, but sadly little else is known of him. Kenneth died on 30 September 1945, aged 24, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

Patrick Lewis Dunne, Petty Officer, P/J 108617, Royal Navy. Patrick was the son of Patrick and Mary Ann Dunne, of Tenby. He married Doris Myrtle Thompson, of St. Dominic's Cottage, Carisbrook, Isle of Wright, prior to the war. Patrick served in the Royal Navy aboard the battlecruiser HMS Hood. When war was declared, Hood was operating in the North Atlantic. On 24 May 1941 she intercepted the German pocket battleship Bismarck. The mighty ships began to rain shells down at each other, but a salvo from Bismarck struck Hood in the aft magazines, and the ship exploded and sunk, with the loss of all bar three of her crew of 1,418. Patrick was 33 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire. Patrick is not commemorated at Tenby.

 

James M Edwards, Lieutenant, 137146, Royal Horse Artillery. James was the son of William Stanley Edwards and Elsie Margaret Edwards, and was commissioned into the Royal Artillery. He served with their 4th Regiment, and took part in the Normandy landings, in the subsequent break-out from Normandy, and the drive north into Belgium and Holland. James was killed in Holland on 18 November 1944. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Swartbroek Churchyard, Netherlands.

Peter James Emerton, Squadron Leader (Pilot), 37762, Royal Air Force. Peter was the son of Henry Wilfred Emerton and of Ethel May Emerton (nee Field). He was educated at Tenby Council School, prior to marrying Gwynneth Nina Harris, and the couple lived at Sheerness, Kent. Peter had enlisted into the Royal Air Force prior to the war, where he trained as a Pilot. On 14 November 1943, Peter was the Pilot of Halifaz DG-230 which took off from its base at Marston Moor for an air-test. Soon after take off the aircraft's two starboard engines failed and the aircraft crashed into a pond at Kirk Hammerton, killing four of the five man crew. Peter was one of the dead. He was 26 years old, and is buried at Aldershot Military Cemetery. Peter is not commemorated on the main Tenby War Memorial, but at his former School.

John Theodore Eshelby, Pilot Officer (Flt Engr.), 185304, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Edgar Boulton Eshelby and Alma Eshelby. He married Yvonne Therry at Tenby in 1940. John served with 460 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was an Australian Squadron, which flew the Short Sunderland 'flying boat'. John was killed on 3 January 1945 when his Sunderland, ML738, crashed during take-off at Alness, Scotland, killing five of her crew. John was 36 years old when he died, and was brought back to Tenby for burial at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery. Yvonne later resided at Maida Vale, London. John is not commemorated at Tenby.

David Gwynne Evans, Flying Officer (Pilot), 132703, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of Sydney Charles and Evelyn Caroline Evans, of Hillside, Greenhill Avenue, Tenby. He was educated at Greenhill School before enlisting into the Royal Navy, training as an Engine Room Artificer at Portsmouth. David then became interested in flying, and left the Royal Navy to train as a Pilot with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David then learnt to fly in Canada, with the Empire Air Training School, alongside David Booker from Tenby. Upon his return, he served as a Pilot with 86 Squadron, RAF, which was an anti shipping squadron, equipped with the Consolidated Liberator V. On 23 October 1943, David was co-pilot aboard Liberator FL954, which was detailed for convoy escort duty in the Atlantic. The aircraft took off but soon developed technical problems, and crashed at Lough Foyle, County Derry, Ireland, killing all eight of the crew. David was 22 years old, and was brought home to be buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

Norman John Evans, Captain, 193795, the Welch Regiment. Norman was originally commissioned from the Welsh Guards into the Welch Regiment on 11 July 1941, probably after serving with the Welsh Guards during the fall of France in 1940. He was attached to the 9th Battalion, Cameronians for the invasion of Normandy. The battalion was attached to 46 Brigade, 15th (Scottish) Division, and landed on 17 June 1944 onto the Normandy beaches. In the coming weeks, the Division took part in the break out from the beaches, and on 11 July 1944, Norman was killed. He is buried at Beny-Sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery, Reviers, France. He was 27 years old. His brother Richard Charles Evans also fell.

Richard Charles Evans, Private, 14206505, the Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert's). Richard served with the 4th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, which was attached to 129 Brigade, 43rd (Wessex) Division. The brigade landed on the Normandy beaches on 23 June 1944, and took part in the break out from the beach-head. Richard was killed just days after landing, on 29 June 1944. He was 21 years old, and is buried at St. Manvieu War Cemetery, Cheux, France. He was 20 years old. His brother Norman John Evans also fell. Richard is to the left in the photograph. His brother Norman is alongside him.

The Reverend Edward Thomas George, Chaplain 4th Class, 178165, Royal Army Chaplains' Department. Edward was born at Treorchy in 1895, the son of John and Hannah George. He was educated at University College, Cardiff and Memorial College, Brecon, before serving during the Great War with the Royal Air Force. Edward was serving as the Chaplain to the United Boards Troop at Pembroke Dock from 1925, and married Helen Mary Sandercock in 1927, and the couple resided at 135, Station Road, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent after 1929. Upon the outbreak of WW2, Edward became Chaplain to the 22nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). He died on 21 June 1941, aged 46, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery. Edward is not commemorated at Tenby.

Arthur R. J. Glass, Corporal, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Arthur was born in Swindon in 1913, and was educated at Tenby Council School. He married Winifred T. Potter in Chelmsford in 1937, and served with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Little else has yet been discovered about Arthur, except that his death was registered at Haverfordwest in the last quarter of 1946.

Richard Henry Glue, Major (Quartermaster), 39029, Royal Engineers. Richard was the son of Richard and Frances Glue, of Dover, Kent. Richard had followed his father into the army as a career soldier, and had married Evelyn Daisy John on 26 April 1907. He served during the Great War with the Royal Engineers. Richard had been posted to Pembroke Dock at the outbreak of WW2, moving his family there before settling at Tenby in 1940, and served as Quartermaster in the Royal Engineers. He died suddenly on 10 May 1943, aged 58. Richard is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

William John Goodridge, Serjeant, 3850764, Royal Artillery. William was the son of William John and Margarette Ellenore Goodridge, of Tenby, and the husband of Ada Lucy Goodridge, of Reading, Berkshire. He served with 551 Coast Regiment, Royal Artillery. William must have been killed in an accident, as another man of his battery died the same day as him, on Sunday 10 May 1942. William was 36 years old, and is buried at Reading (Henley Road) Cemetery.

Donald Edward Grant, Pilot Officer, 133564, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Donald was the son of Thomas Edward and Edith Annie Grant, of Totton, Hampshire, and the husband of Mary Ann Grant. He served with 102 Squadron, RAF, which was a bomber Squadron, one of its officers being George Leonard Cheshire, VC, and was based at RAF Pocklington, flying the Lancaster. Donald was killed on a bombing mission over Germany on 5 March 1943. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

George Henry Griffiths, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1835969, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. George was the son of Harold Hector and Alice Maud Griffiths, of Tenby, and served with 630 Squadron, RAF, which flew the Lancaster heavy bomber. On the night of 20 February 1944, George took off in his Lancaster, as part of a bombing group bound for Stuttgart. Sadly his aeroplane was one of two which were lost that night, with no survivors. George was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

William Lionel Horner, Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Alfred Lionel and Gladys Joyce Horner, and served aboard the aircraft carrier HMS Furious. When World War II started, Furious was attached to the Home Fleet, mostly hunting U-boats in the Atlantic, and carrying bullion to Canada. She took part in Operation Pedestal, carrying aircraft to Malta, and after a refit in the United States, Furious took part in Operation Torch, the landings in North Africa, in November 1942. In 1943, she took part in strikes against German shipping, and attacked the German Battleship Tirpitz in Altafjord Norway. William was killed on 11 February 1944. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Lee-On-Solent Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Rowena Hulton, Corporal, 888042, Women’s Auxiliary Air Force. Rowena was the Daughter of Colonel Frederick Courteney Longuet Hulton, C.B., 1st Dragoon Guards, and Nellie Hulton, of Tenby. She served with the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, based at Inverness. Rowena took ill and died, aged 44, on 20 June 1941, and is buried at Inverness (Tomnahurich) Cemetery, Scotland

 

John Oliver Ingham, Major, IA/996, Royal Deccan Horse. John was the son of Lt.-Col. Robert John Fitzgerald Ingham, DSO, and of Ella Prendergast Ingham, of Tenby. He was commissioned into the Indian Army in September 1932, and during the war served with the Royal Deccan Horse (9th Horse), Indian Armoured Corps. John survived the war, but died in Karachi on 18 February 1947, aged 34. He is buried at Karachi War Cemetery, Pakistan. John's father, Robert John Fitzgerald Ingham, was killed during WW1, but neither man is commemorated at Tenby.

 

Richard Benjamin Vaughan James, Second Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. Richard was the son of William Benjamin James, and Lily Kate James, of Tenby, and served in the Merchant Navy, aboard SS Zurichmoor, a London registered cargo steamer. Zurichmoor, which was owned by Moor Line Ltd, had been sailing independently from Halifax, Nova Scotia to St. Thomas, Virgin Islands in ballast after crossing the Atlantic in Convoy ON-90. The ship and her crew of 44 never reached St. Thomas. The ship was not officially classed as missing/untraced until 29 July 1942. A German radio message was later intercepted claiming the ship had been sunk by U-432 on 23 May 1943 East of Philadelphia. Richard was 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Desmond Charles James Calcutt John, Guardsman, 2735127, Welsh Guards. Desmond was the son of Harry and Veneda Rachiel John, of Tenby, and was a regular soldier, serving with the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards at the outbreak of war. The Welsh Guards moved to France as part of the BEF, and took up positions in the city of Arras on 17 May 1940. In May 1940, the Germans launched their Blitzkrieg into France, and Arras was bombed heavily on 19 May, with heavy fighting following. On 24 May the Welsh Guards were ordered to withdraw, and began a fighting retreat towards Dunkirk. Desmond was killed during a brief, but fierce, rearguard action at West Cappel on 29 May 1940. The German advance was delayed, but at a heavy cost to the Welsh Guards. Desmond was 20 years old, and is buried at West Cappel Churchyard, Belgium.

Jack Garner Jones, MID, Lieutenant, Royal Marines. Jack was the Husband of Legarde De A Jones (nee John), of Tenby and Stockport. He served with No. 42 Royal Marine Commando in the Far East. Jack was killed in Burma on 31 January 1945, aged 22. He is buried at Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar. Jack is not commemorated at Tenby.

 

Charles Henry Burman King, Private, 3974340, Pioneer Corps. Charles was born at Cardiff in 1907. He served with the Pioneer Corps during the war, probably working on the coastal defences in Pembrokeshire. He died, aged 35, on 29 June 1942, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery, Wales. Charles is not commemorated at Tenby.

Miss Evelyn Annie King, Civilian Air Raid Victim. Evelyn was the Daughter of Mrs. H. E. King, and lived at 111, Banstead Road, Caterham. She was killed during the German Blitz on 16 April 1941. Evelyn was 25 years old.

Ronald David Charles Lewis, Private, 14206532, Somerset Light Infantry. Ronald was the son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Lewis, of Tenby. He served with the 4th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, which was training for its part in the invasion of Normandy when Ronald died, aged 21, on 29 May 1944. He is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

Samuel Snell Lewis, Ordinary Seaman, LT/JX 170661, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Samuel was the son of Thomas Snell Lewis and Elizabeth Martha Lewis, of Tenby, and the Husband of Madge Vera Lewis, of Tenby. He served in the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard HM Trawler Argyllshire. She had been hired in September 1939 and converted for anti-submarine duties, joining the 11th Anti Submarine Striking Group, and took part in Norwegian campaign in April and May 1940. She then took part in the evacuation of Dunkirk, but was sunk by a torpedo from a German E-boat off Dunkirk on 1 June 1940. Samuel died aboard the ship that day. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk.

 

Frank Stanley Mason, Lieutenant, 149207, Reconnaissance Corps. Frank was the son of David Richard and Selina Machel Mason, of Tenby, and the husband of Dorothy Lilian Mason, of Cricklewood, Middlesex. He had volunteered for special duties, and joined No. 2 Commando sometime after 1941. Frank was then attached to the Reconnaissance Corps, and landed on the beach at Salerno on 9 September 1943, and was just four days later, on 13 September 1943. He was 31 years old, and is buried at Salerno War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Jack Cosby Mason, Lieutenant, Royal Navy. Jack served at HMS Nile, which was a shore establishment, rather than an actual vessel. Based at Ras el Tin Point, Alexandria, Nile had a large number of personnel on the books, and Jack was based in Egypt. Jack died on 6 January 1943, and is buried at Heliopolis War Cemetery, Greece.

 

John Herbert Newman, Sergeant, CH/X. 101252, Royal Marines. John was born in 1916. He served with the 15th Battalion, Royal Marines during the war. John died, aged 25, on 1 August 1941, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery. John is not commemorated at Tenby.

John William Nicholas, Major, Indian Army, 26th Punjabis. John was the elder son of Mr. J.W. Nicholas, who was Clerk to Carmarthen County Council. John served as a J.P., and lived at Maestilo, Llandeilo. He had joined the Indian Army in 1914, and fought throughout WW1 in Egypt and Palestine. In 1924 he was invalided out of the Army with the rank of Captain, and moved into Local Government, serving as High Sheriff in 1936-37, and being a Deputy Lieutenant and Justice of the Peace, as well as serving on Carmarthen County Council. In 1939 John re-enlisted with the rank of Major, into the Pioneer Corps. He was employed by the War Office to take charge of the organisation of Pioneer Corps throughout Wales, and was then seconded to the Ministry of Food in Cardiff. John died in Hospital in London in August 1943 after undergoing an operation, leaving his widow and 11 year old son behind. No more is known of him.

Richard Charles Andrew Nicholl, Marine, PLY/X 1995, Royal Marines. Richard was the son of Charles Thomas Nicholl and Mary Sophia Nicholl, of Tenby, and served aboard HMS Glorious. On the afternoon of Saturday 8 June 1940, the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious and her escorting destroyers HMS Acasta and HMS Ardent were intercepted in the Norwegian Sea by the German battlecruisers Gneisenau and Scharnhorst. The three British ships were sunk by gunfire in a little over two hours, with the loss of over 1500 officers and men. Richard was one of the missing. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

John Paul Vipond Nicholls, MID, Squadron Leader (Pilot), 40560, Royal Air Force. John was the son of John Richard Lee Nicholls and Gladys Nicholls, of Yorkshire. He married Grace White, of Tenby, in 1941. John had been in the Royal Air Force for several years prior to the war, and served as a Pilot with 150 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The squadron was equipped with Vickers Wellingtons, operating from RAF Newton. On 9 March 1942 John was flying his Wellington on a raid over Germany when it was brought down, killing all of its crew. John was 30 years old, and is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Germany. John is not commemorated at Tenby.

 

Thomas Peter Treleaven Oliver, Flight Sergeant (Pilot), 1094666, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Peter was the son of Joseph Thomas Perry Oliver and Muriel Adelaide Oliver, of Tenby, and served with the RAF in the Middle East. Little else is known, but Thomas died on 29 November 1943, aged 22, and is buried at Tripoli War Cemetery, Libya.          

Charles Page, Petty Officer, P/JX 152376, Royal Navy. Charles was the son of Arthur Francis and Daisy Clara Page, of Brighton, Sussex. He served aboard HMS Hythe, which was a minesweeper. At just after one in the morning of 11 October 1943, HMS Hythe was torpedoed and sunk off Bougie, Algeria by the German submarine U-371. Charles died in the sinking. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

Samuel Oliver Alec Palmer, Warrant Officer Class II (C.S.M.), 6007427, Lancashire Fusiliers. Samuel was born at Romford Essex on 24 January 1910. He was probably stationed with the Essex Regiment at Penally when he met and married Kitty Clark at Tenby in 1933, and the couple resided with Kitty's parents at Laston House, in Tenby Harbour. The couple had four children, Margaret, Colin, Roy, and Robin. Samuel was a well known athlete, and in 1939 he was the British Athletic Association 6 mile record holder. At some time prior to 1943, Samuel was posted to the 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, which was in the Far East, attached to 77 Brigade of the famous Chindits. On 5 March 1944 the Chindits flew into Burma, to take part in their second operation against the Japanese. Samuel was killed in action during the assault on the Japanese garrison at Moguang on 18. June 1944. He was 34 years old, and is buried at Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar. Samuel is not commemorated on the Tenby Memorial. Many thanks to Neil Palmer for the details.

Paul Parbury, MC and Bar, Major, 56597, Royal Artillery. Paul was the son of Lt.-Col. Ernest Parbury and Doris Brooke Parbury, of Tenby, and served with 124 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. Paul won two Military Crosses for his bravery during the fighting in North Africa, but was killed in the ensuing invasion of Italy on 14 July 1943. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Catania War Cemetery, Sicily.

Colin Aveston Rees, Ordinary Seaman, D/JX. 651040, Royal Navy. Colin was the son of George Howard Rees and Sophia Ann Rees, of Pembroke Villas, Tenby, and served aboard the light cruiser HMS Diomede. Diomede had taken part in several naval actions during the early part of the war, but had become obsolete, and was transferred to Rosyth for use as a training vessel. Colin died at Rosyth on 17 January 1944. He was 18 years old, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

John Rees, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1296970, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of John and Margaret Rees, of Tenby, and the Husband of Doris May Rees, of Tenby. He served in India with the Royal Air Force, and died there on 2 December 1942. John was 33 years old, and is buried at Ranchi War Cemetery, India.

David Ernest Stuart Richards, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1153338, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of Thomas H. Richards and Emily Richards, of New Hedges, and served with the Royal Air Force. He died in Pembrokeshire on 6 September 1941, during the time of the Battle of Britain, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery. David was 20 years old.

John David Richards, MID, Chief Petty Officer, Royal Navy. John was the son of John Edward and Sophia Richards, of Tenby, and served at HMS Drake. She was an old monitor, which had proved to be of no use, and so was used for training of stokers. John was mentioned in despatches during the war, but died on 24 November 1944, aged 44, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

William Peter Shand, DFC, Wing Commander (Pilot), 33285, Royal Air Force. William was the son of William and Josephine Shand, of Caldy Island. On 1 August 1936 Peter passed out from Cranwell, and was granted a commission as Pilot Officer. When war broke out Peter was posted to 139 (Jamaica) Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was an elite unit, equipped with the De Havilland Mosquito.On 20 April 1943 Peter took off from RAF Marham, in Norfolk, for a raid on the Dutch coast. His Mosquito, Serial DZ386, crashed at Ijsselmeer, killing Peter and his navigator, Christopher Handley. William was 27 years old, and is buried alongside Christopher at Wonseradeel (Makkum) Protestant Churchyard, Netherlands. William is not commemorated at Tenby.

 

Anthony Sinnatt, Civilian Concentration Camp Victim. Anthony was the juvenile Son of Lt. J. A. H. Sinnatt, Royal Artillery, and of Louise Sinnatt. He was captured, along with his mother, during the Japanese invasion of Sumatra. Sadly Anthony lost his mother Louise when she died on 23 February 1945, and within weeks the young Anthony died at Lahat, Sumatra on 14 April 1945. Anthony was just six years old.

Louise Sinnatt, Civilian Concentration Camp Victim. Louise was the Daughter of Mrs. E. Turner Lewis, of 3 Creswell Street, Tenby, and the wife of Lt. John Anthony Hamilton Sinnatt, Royal Artillery. She was taken prisoner, along with John and their baby son, during the Japanese invasion of Sumatra, and died at Muntok, Banka Island, Sumatra on 23 February 1945, leaving her six year old son to fend for himself, until he sadly died on 14 April. Louise was 32 years old.

Ellis Trevor Skyrm, Craftsman, 7596453, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Ellis was the son of Richard and Priscilla Skyrm, of Penally. He was educated at Tenby Council School, prior to marrying Mary Mildred Beams at Bootle in 1941. Little is yet known of Ellis' service during the war, but he was a Craftsman with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and died in Northumberland on 15 November 1942, aged 25. Ellis is buried at Penally (St. Nicholas) Churchyard. Ellis is not commemorated on the main Tenby War Memorial, but at his former School, and at Penally.

William Henry Stubbs, Petty Officer, D/JX. 130395, Royal Navy. William was the son of William Henry and Elizabeth Ann Stubbs, of Tenby, and was known to his friends as Ginger. He had married prior to the outbreak of war, and lived with his wife Nancy Stubbs, at Penally. Ginger served with the Royal Navy, as a Petty Officer, aboard HMS Cattistock, a Type I 'Hunt' Class Destroyer. Cattistock had been launched on 22 February 1940, and took part in the evacuation of troops from Le Havre during August 1940, receiving heavy damage. On 29 August 1944, William was aboard HMS Cattistock, while she was on duty in the Channel, alongside the frigate HMS Rettalick. The ships were intercepted by a group of German vessels, who were evacuating Le Havre. In the subsequent battle, the Cattistock received over 20 direct hits, including one to the bridge which killed the ship’s captain and several of her crew, including Ginger. His daughter was just four months old when he died and his wife Nancy never remarried. A plaque in memory of Ginger was placed on the wall of Tenby’s Fisherman’s Chapel, by the harbour, by his widow. William was 32 years old when he died that day, and his body was brought home to be buried at St. Mary Church Cemetery, Tenby.

Annie Dinah Thomas, Civilian Air Raid Victim, Civilian. Annie was the Widow of George Thomas, and lived at St. Ronan's, Queen's Parade, Tenby. She died there during an air raid on 12 October 1941, aged 78, and is buried at Tenby.

 

Archibald Elwyn Thomas, Trooper, 7957756, Royal Armoured Corps. Archie was the Son of Thomas Benjamin and Jane Thomas, Of Tenby, and served with the 48th Royal Tank Regiment, part of the Royal Armoured Corps. They were equipped with the Churchill Tank, and fought in North Africa and Italy during the war. Archibald must have been wounded at some time, and returned home for treatment. He died on 29 January 1945, aged 22, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

Frank Gilbert Thomas, Guardsman, 2738575, Welsh Guards. Frank was the son of Charles Hermann D. and Alice Martha Thomas, of Tenby, and served with the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards. In June 1944 the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards landed in Normandy, attached to 32nd Guards Brigade, Guards Armoured Division. During the coming weeks, the Welsh Guards took part in the break-out from the Normandy beach-head, and in the drive into Belgium. Frank was killed in Belgium on 5 September 1944. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Auderghem (Oudergem) Communal Cemetery, Belgium.

Lillian Thomas. Lillian is commemorated on the Tenby Council School Memorial, but her identity has not yet been identified.

Norman Haskell Thomas, Deck Hand (Gunner), Merchant Navy. Norman was the son of Cyril John Childs Thomas and Elizabeth Thomas, of Chatham, and served aboard SS Gairsoppa, a Glasgow registered vessel. Gairsoppa was carrying a cargo of pig iron, tea, general cargo and silver ingots from Calcutta to London in convoy SL.64 when she was detached to Galway due to lack of fuel. Unfortunately, just after midnight on 17 February 1941, en route to Galway, she was torpedoed and sunk by U-101, with only one survivor. Norman must have been the lone survivor, but he died on 1 March 1941, aged 20, and is buried at Landewednack (St. Winwallow) Churchyard, Cornwall.

 

Hugo Moreton Waddington Thomas-Ferrand, Wing Commander, 34032, Royal Air Force. Hugo was born on 30 August 1913, the son of Commander Richard Thomas Waddington Thomas-Ferrand, R.N. and Rachel Eira Moreton Thomas-Ferrand. Hugo was educated at Charterhouse between 1927 and 1931, before joining the Royal Air Force in 1933. He became the husband of Joyce Margaret Thomas-Ferrand, and the couple lived in London. Hugo was serving as Wing Commander towards the end of the war, and was on leave in Tenby when he suddenly died on 29 March 1945, aged 32. Hugo is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery. Hugo is not commemorated locally.

Reginald John Toms, Private, 6146258, The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment). Reginald was the Husband of Thelma Toms (nee Greenstock), of Tenby. He served with the 5th Battalion, The Buffs, which was attached to 36 Brigade, 78th Division. The division served in the North African campaign. Reginald was killed in North Africa on 15 April 1943, aged 23, and is commemorated on the Medjez-El-Bab Memorial, Tunisia. Reginald is not commemorated at Tenby.

Edward George Vare, Serjeant, 7880459, Royal Armoured Corps. Edward was the son of Percy and Elizabeth Mary Vare of Penally. He had married prior to the war, and lived with his wife Maud Vare, at Waungilwen, Cardiganshire. Edward served with the 12th Royal Tank Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps, which fought in North Africa, before taking part in the invasions of Sicily and Italy. Edward was killed in action in Tunis on 6 May 1943. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Massicault War Cemetery, Medjez-el-Bab, Tunis.

Michael Herbert St John Wallis, Marine, PO/X 4834, Royal Marines. Michael was born at Tenby on 29 April 1920, the son of Lieutenant-Commander William Wallis and Mrs Mary Wallis. The family later moved to 5, Sydney Buildings, Bath. Michael was educated at Monkton Combs before enlisting into the Royal Marines, and served aboard the battlecruiser HMS Hood. Hood was patrolling around Iceland with HMS Prince of Wales on 24 May 1941, when they sighted the German pocket Battleship Bismarck. The mighty ships opened fire on each other, and a salvo of shells from Bismarck hit the aft magazines of Hood, causing a huge explosion which blew the ship apart and killed all bar three of her crew of 1,418. Michael was 21 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire. Michael is not commemorated at Tenby.

 

Hanvar Walters, Sapper, 1881335, Royal Engineers. Hanvar was the son of Thomas Arthur and Emma Walters, of 13, Edward Street, Tenby. He married Violet Theresa Dando, of Pembroke, in 1934, and the couple lived at Haverfordwest. Hanvar served with 930 Port Construction Company, Royal Engineers. Little else is known of him, but he died on 27 August 1941, aged 28, and is buried at Tenby (St. Mary) Church Cemetery.

Neville Phillip Warlow, Sergeant (Air Gunner), Royal Air Force. Neville was the son of John and Maud Alice Warlow, of Swanscombe, Kent, and served with 103 Squadron, RAF. The squadron was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster, and based at RAF Elsham Wolds in Lincolnshire. Neville was killed during a bombing raid over Germany on 28 May 1944. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

Charles Oliver Webb, Serjeant, 833203, Royal Artillery. Charles was the Husband of Constance May Webb, of Tenby, and served with 239 Battery, 77 Heavy Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. Charles was captured in Java, after the Japanese had invaded the British Fortress Island of Singapore, leading to its surrender on 15 February 1942. He survived twenty-one months in captivity before being embarked aboard the Japanese transport Suez Maru in November 1943, to be shipped to Japan for forced labour, along with 545 other British prisoners. Unfortunately, the Suez Maru was spotted and torpedoed on 29 November 1943 by the American submarine U.S.S. Bonefish, and sank. The survivors were machine gunned in the water by the Japanese, leaving no survivors. Charles was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial. Many thanks to Nigel Anstey for the photograph.

Margaret Holiday Weight, Aircraftwoman 2nd Class, 2037142, Women's Auxiliary Air Force. Margaret was the daughter of Harry Ewart Weight and Olive Margaret Weight, of Tenby. She served with the Women's Auxiliary Air Force. Margaret died on active service on 16 December 1942, aged 25, and is buried at Penarth Cemetery, Glamorganshire. Margaret is not commemorated at Tenby.

Richard Edmund Wilson, Sergeant (Observer), 565833, Royal Air Force. Richard had been educated at Monmouth School, before joining the Royal Air Force. He had served at Basra for three years prior to the war, when he was posted to RAF Carew Cheriton. Richard met and married Myfanwy Dobson, from Tenby, but he was killed when his Hawker Henley, Serial L3427 crashed at Nash Villa on 23 April 1940. Richard is buried at Carew (St. Mary) New Churchyard. His widow gave birth to their daughter five months later.

There is also the grave of an unknown Merchant Sailor buried at Tenby (St. Mary's) Churchyard, whose body was buried at Tenby on 18 January 1943.

News Items

Due to a recent spate of material being copied from this website without any permission or acknowledgement, anyone wishing to use material from the website are reminded that all text and photographs are copyrighted by the author.

25 July 2014. Some more good news today. John Tyson Lloyd, a Trooper with the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, from Henllan Amgoed, near Whitland has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC. See the Uncommemorated Men page for details.

22 July 2014. A mixture of good and bad news today. I have just been advised that two cases that I had put forward to the CWGC for commemoration have been rejected, William Ronald Hastings and Albert Wilfred Mason. However, the good news is that Benjamin Oscar Davies, of Camrose, has been accepted for commemoration as a war casualty. Please see the Uncommemorated Local Men page of the website for further details.

5 July 2014. The war memorial of Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, Carmarthen has been added to the website.

3 June 2014. With my book, Carmarthen in the Great War now published and available, I have today had the great news from my publishers, Pen & Sword, that they are willing to publish my third book, under the banner:

‘WELSH YEOMANRY AT WAR.’

A History of the 24th (Pembroke and Glamorgan Yeomanry) Battalion The Welsh Regiment.

The book covers the raising of the Pembroke and Glamorgan Yeomanry regiments for war, training in Norfolk, and the move to Egypt, where they merged to form the 24th (Pembroke and Glamorgan Yeomanry) Battalion, The Welsh Regiment in 1917. As soon as I receive more news, I will update the website, but the contracts have just been signed.

3 June 2014. A new section has been created, entitled Pre WW1 Memorials, which will incorporate all of the war memorials prior to 1914. At the moment only four memorials have been added. The Carmarthen Crimea Monument, the Carmarthen County Boer War Memorial, the Llanelli Boer War Memorial, and the Pembroke County Boer War Memorial. More individual memorials will be added as time permits.

29 April 2014. Some great news today. On Saturday 26 April the CWGC accepted four more men from West Wales who I had put forward for commemoration. These men are: William Harold George Henshaw, of Llanelli; Benjamin Reynolds, of Solva; Charles Archibald Walters, of Goodwick; and Ernest Evan Williams, of Pembroke Dock. Please see the Uncommemorated Local Men page of the website for further details.

9 April 2014. After having been forgotten for 97 years, Llanelli man, Ernest William Sherwood, has just been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC. Please see the Uncommemorated Men page of the website for further details.

 

5 April 2014. After two years and three months of being sat on a desk in the MOD, I have received the welcome news today that another local man, Edward Idris Evans, of Kidwelly, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC. Please see the Uncommemorated Men page of the website for further details.

7 February 2014. After a long battle, Gunner Robert Corfield, of Aberystwyth, has finally been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC. Please see the Uncommemorated Local Men page of the website for further details.

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