West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llanelli Grammar School War Memorial

Llanelli County School was formed in 1894 as a result of the realisation for the need of the provision of intermediate education for local children. Sir Arthur Stepney gifted two acres of land opposite Llanelli General Hospital for the building of the new school, which opened on 22 January 1895, firstly in rented accommodation. The new school building was completed and opened on 27 September 1897. The members of Llanelli County School for Boys who fell during the Great War were commemorated on a war memorial which was unveiled by the Mayor of Llanelli on 14 November 1938. The school later became Llanelli Grammar School and the members of the Grammar School who fell during the Second World War were commemorated on a second war memorial. These war memorial plaques have only recently been commissioned and dedicated as previously the names were on two rolls of honour.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Bramwell George Adams, Lieutenant, Australian Infantry. Bramwell was born in Bristol in 1881, the son of Alfred George and Sarah Adams. He was educated at Cardiff University prior to becoming a schoolteacher at Llanelli County School, where he served as assistant master for four years. Bramwell married Sarah Louisa Richards, of Llanelli, in 1911 and the couple then emigrated to Australia in 1912, where Bramwell had gained a position at Gympie High School, in Queensland. He enlisted at Melbourne on 10 July 1915 and was posted to the 9th Battalion, Australian Force, embarking from Brisbane, Queensland, on board HMAT A73 Commonwealth on 28 March 1916 as part of the 15th Reinforcements and arrived in England. On 16 September he was taken on strength by the 9th Battalion, which was on the Somme attached to the 9th Australian Brigade. The battalion remained on the Somme throughout the winter of 1916-17 and by 25 February 1917 was holding the line near Bazentin le Petit. Bramwell was shot dead by a sniper while leading a patrol that day. The 30-year-old was buried on the battlefield north of Flers by his men, but his grave was lost and he is commemorated on the Australian National Memorial, Villers-Bretonneux, France.

William George Aubrey, Private, 1301, Welsh Guards. William was born at Burry Port on 16 December 1893, the son of John Aubrey and Mary Aubrey (nee Watkins). He was the brother of the Reverend John Aubrey, of Rhoslwyn Villa, Penybank, Ammanford. The family later resided at New Lodge, Pontyberem. William worked as a Fireman at the New Dynant Colliery, but when war was declared, he enlisted at Kingston, Surrey into the Welsh Regiment. Later he transferred into the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards, which were attached to 3 Brigade, Guards Division. William served with the Welsh Guards at the Battle of Loos and fought with them on the Somme in 1916. He suffered terrible injuries from a German shell explosion at Sailly-Saillisel on 10 December 1916 and died the same day. William was 23 years old, and is buried at Bronfay Farm Military Cemetery, Bray Sur Somme, France.

Harding Thomas Bevan, Private, 4616, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Harding was the son of Daniel and Margaret Bevan, of Talywern, Llangennech. He enlisted at Armoury House, London on 27 October 1915 into the Honourable Artillery Company, which was attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division. He embarked for France on 29 June 1916, and joined the battalion on the Somme on 7 July 1916, less than a week into the Battle of the Somme. Harding was killed later in the battle, during the Battle of the Ancre, on 15 November 1916. He was 32 years old. He probably had a grave at some time, as his personal effects were returned to his parents, but like so many other men who died on the Somme, his grave was lost, and Harding is commemorated on Pier and Face 8A of the Thiepval Memorial, France.

George Cyril Blake, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. George was born on 21 September 1886, the only son of George Frederick and Annie Lambert Blake, of 35, College Hill, Llanelli. He was commissioned into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. George must have taken ill during this time, and was evacuated to England, where he was hospitalised at Manchester. He died there on 5 November 1917, aged 31, and is buried at Manchester Southern Cemetery.

 

Richard Bowen, Sapper, 197432, Royal Engineers. Richard was the son of John and Mary Bowen, of Pontyates. He was educated at Cardiff and Aberystwyth, and worked as Assistant Master at Aber Council School, Ogmore Vale prior to the war. Richard joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers soon after the outbreak of war, but then transferred to the 4th Special Brigade of the Royal Engineers, which was a Special (Gas) Company. Richard was wounded in France on 7 May 1917. He was brought back to Warrington Hospital, where he died of his wounds on 5 June 1917. Richard was 28 years old and was buried with full military honours at Pontyates Congregational Chapelyard.

Ernest Wilberforce Davies, Private, 49278, Royal Army Medical Corps. Ernest was the son of Thomas Rhys Davies and Margaret Davies, of Compton House, Vaughan Street, Llanelli. Educated at Llandovery from 1909 to 1912, Ernest entered St. David's College, Lampeter, where he was studying at the time when he volunteered for military service, enlisting into the Royal Army Medical Corps at Llanelli. Ernest sailed for the Mediterranean on 13 June 1915, and landed at Anzac Cove, Gallipoli, in early August, in preparation for the attack on Sari Bair. His Field Ambulance Unit established a Dressing Station at the crossroads near Aghyl Dere, and in the battle which followed, Ernest Davies died of wounds on 13 August 1915. He was 23 years old and is commemorated on a Special Memorial at the 7th Field Ambulance Cemetery, Gallipoli.

John Edgar Davies, Private, 15250, Connaught Rangers. John was the son of William and Margaret Davies, of 5, Pennant Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted at Marylebone into the Wiltshire Regiment, but was later posted to the 5th Battalion, Connaught Rangers, which was attached to 197 Brigade, 66th (2nd East Lancs) Division. The Division concentrated on the Western Front in March 1917 and moved to the Flanders Coast. At the end of September 1917, they moved to Ypres, and took part in the Battle of Poelcapelle. They then moved south to the Somme, and on 21 March 1918 were hit by the German Spring Offensive at the Battle of St Quentin and moving back west fought at the Actions at the Somme Crossings, and the Battle of Rosières. After suffering very heavy casualties during the Battles of the Somme in 1918, the Division was first reduced to a training cadre and then reformed and reconstituted, before taking part in the final offensive, fighting at the Battle of Cambrai, and the Pursuit to the Selle and the Battle of the Selle. John was wounded during the final days of the war, and died on 8 November 1918, aged 22. He is buried at Pont-Sur-Sambre Communal Cemetery, France.

Onslow Davies, Gunner, 161163, Royal Garrison Artillery. Onslow was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Anne Davies, of Ty Isaf, Pontyates. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Royal Garrison Artillery. He was posted to their 200th Siege Battery, which was in France from November 1916 onwards. Little else is known of Onslow, but he fell overboard and drowned whilst aboard the SS Osmanieh in the Mediterranean on 31 December 1917, aged 20. He is commemorated on the Alexandria Chatby Memorial, Egypt.

 

Philip Brynmor Davies, Private, 22836, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Philip was the son of Richard and Catherine Davies, of The Emporium, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 2 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. Philip was killed on 10 July 1916, aged 25. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

William Gilbert Daw, Private, 6516, Honourable Artillery Company. William was the son of William and Elizabeth Agnes Daw, of Gunnerside, Queen Victoria Road, Llanelli. He enlisted in December 1915 into the 5th Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company. On 18 November 1916 he was posted to the 2/1st Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company, which was attached to 22 Brigade, 7th Division. In March 1917 the Division followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line. Later in the year the Division took part in the Third Battle of Ypres, suffering significant losses during the fighting for Polygon Wood. Immediately on their relief, the Division was moved to Italy. William was shot in the knee, and captured by the Austrians on 29 June 1917, during the Battle of The Piave River. He died of his wounds on 13 July 1918, aged 27, and was buried at Magnaboschi Military Cemetery, Italy by the Austrian Chaplain Franz Kokol.

David Gwynne Edmunds, Captain, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of William Price Edmunds and Elizabeth A. Edmunds, of Anchor House, Burry Port. He originally enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry, and served with a Motor Despatch unit before being commissioned into the 18th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The Battalion was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division, which was formed between September and December 1915, composed of bantam units and others which had a mixture of regulation-height and shorter men. Weeding out of very under-sized or unfit men delayed the training programme, and it was not until late Spring 1916 that the Division was ready to proceed on active service. The Division moved to France during June 1916 and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March, 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. David was killed at Cambrai on 25 November 1917, aged just 21. He has no known grave, and so is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Albert Llewellyn Edwards, Private, 39318, Essex Regiment. Albert was the son of Joseph and Jemima Edwards, of 110, Station Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the army, and was posted to the 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment, which was attached to 112 Brigade, 37th Division on 4 February 1918, after having spent most of the war with the 29th Division. During March 1918 the Division was at the Somme, and fought during the German Offensive, at the Battle of Albert. Albert was killed here on 23 August 1918. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Fillièvres British Cemetery, France.

Ethelbert Harold Foster, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Ethelbert was the son of Obed and Eliza Jane Foster (nee Williams), of Llantwit Fardre. He was a Science Master at Llanelli for several years prior to the war, and was commissioned into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Ethelbert was then attached to the 1/8th Battalion, London Regiment (Post Office Rifles). He was killed in action during an attack on the Hindenburg Line on 8 October 1918, aged 35, and is buried at Bois-Des-Angles British Cemetery, Crèvecœur-sur-l'Escaut, France.

Thomas George, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of John and Lettice George, of Brynhir, Pembrey. He had been commissioned into the 16th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who were attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they famously captured Mametz Wood. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Here they fought at Pilckem and Langemarck, then moved to Armentieres, where they remained from September 1917 until March, 1918 when the German Spring Offensive was launched. The British had been over-run on the Somme, and so in April the Division was moved south, taking up positions North of Albert, from where they weathered the storm of the coming months, until the war turned during the Battle of Amiens, on 8 August 1918. The Germans had now lost the upper hand, and the 38th Division crossed the flooded River Ancre on 21 August 1918, launching their attack on Thiepval Ridge and Pozieres. Thomas was killed in action just six days into the offensive, near Longueval on 27 August 1918. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval, France.

Alcwyn Morland Gibson, Second Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment. Alcwyn was the son of George and Harriet Gibson, of 58, Alban Road, Llanelli. He had played several games for Llanelli Rugby Club prior to enlisting into the Artists Rifles, and was commissioned into the 1/6th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, which was attached to 146 Brigade, 49th (West Riding) Division. The Division moved to France during April 1915 and saw its first major action on the Somme, during the Battle of Albert. They remained on the Somme, taking part in the Battle of Bazentin, the Battle of Pozières, and the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. Alcwyn was killed at Flers on 27 September 1916 after having been at the front a month. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

R G Griffiths. This man cannot be positively identified, but is possibly:

 

Robert Griffiths, Private, 73685, Welsh Regiment. Robert was the son of John and Jane Griffiths, of 17, Long Road, Felinfoel. He was a collier prior to enlisting on 4 February 1916 into the Welsh Regiment. Robert landed in France on 3 October 1918, joining the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the Carmarthen pals battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The division had been in France since December 1915, and had fought at Mametz Wood and Pilckem Ridge. The division began its part in the great offensive by crossing the flooded River Ancre on 21 August 1918, and over the coming days pushed the Germans back across the old Somme battlefields of 1916, towards the Canal du Nord. A short rest period ensued, during which time the Canal du Nord was breached, so opening a passage through the Hindenburg Line. The Division then fought at the Battle of Beaurevoir, and moved up towards Cambrai, capturing Villers-Outreaux, before advancing to the river Selle, where the 15th Welsh again afforded a river crossing, under heavy fire. Robert was killed here on 20 October 1918, aged 32, and is buried at Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery, France.

John Edwin Howell, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of John and Anne Howell, of Pantymeillion Farm, Llanelli, and had originally served with the Pembroke Yeomanry since enlisting in 1909. At the outbreak of war he had been commissioned into the Welsh Regiment. He was posted to the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began by an attack by the 16th Welsh on 7 July 1916, but met with fierce resistance, and the attack was temporarily delayed. John was killed in action during this initial assault on Mametz Wood, on 7 July 1916. He was 23 years old, and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Brinley Joshua Howells, Private, 6278, Royal Fusiliers. Brinley was the son of John and Esther Howells, of Lynholme, 14, Glenalla Road, Llanelli. He resided at Abertridwr prior to the war, where he worked as a schoolmaster at Senghenydd, and enlisted there into the army. Brinley was posted to the 21st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, which was known as the 4th Public Schools battalion, attached to 19 Brigade, 33rd Division. (The members of the battalion were known as the Chocolate Soldiers by members of the 2nd RWF in the same Brigade, due to the amount of goods sent to them by loved ones back home). Brinley was killed at Loos on 8 February 1916. He was 26 years old, and was buried at Cambrin Churchyard Extension, France.

Frank Ungoed Humphreys, Lance Corporal, 313097, Gordon Highlanders. Frank was born in Berwick, Llwynhendy, the son of John Rees and Casellah Humphreys, of Llwyn Hall, Llwynhendy, Llanelli. Frank was educated at Llandovery from 1913 to 1914, and his brothers, William Leslie Humphreys and Trefor Ungoed Humphreys were also pupils at the School. Frank enlisted at London into the 7th Battalion, Gordon Highlanders, which was attached to 153 Brigade, 51st (Highland) Division. The Division had been in France since early May 1915 and had taken part in several costly actions by the time Frank went to France, probably joining the division on the Somme. The division captured the enemy strong hold of Beaumont-Hamel on 13 November 1916, taking more than 2,000 prisoners. During December and January 1917, the Division remained on the Somme, and saw its next major action in the Battle of Arras, taking part in an attack near Roeux, which it captured before moving north to Ypres. Here the division took part in the opening assault of the Third Battle of Ypres, on 31 July 1917, and the Battle of the Menin Road before being moved south, where it took part in the Battle of Cambrai. The Division remained in the area until 21 March 1918 when the enemy launched its attack on the Somme, and saw heavy fighting before being relieved, and moved to Bethune to rest. Unfortunately, the enemy opened a second phase of his offensive, the Battle of the Lys, on 9 April 1918, and the Highland Division played a key part in beating off incessant attacks. At the beginning of May, the Division moved to Oppy near Arras, where it stayed until 11 July in a relatively quiet spell, however, when a third huge enemy attack opened in the area held by the thinly-stretched French Army south west of Rheims, the Division were sent south to assist. They saw several days of very heavy fighting, which is now officially known as The Battle of the Tardenois. Fighting took place in the valley of the Ardre, at Marfaux and Mont de Bligny. Frank was killed in action on 30 July 1918, during the re-taking of the village of Marfaux, about 11 miles from Rheims. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Marfaux British Cemetery, France.

Idwal Machno Humphreys, Private, 125585, Machine Gun Corps. Idwal was the son of Rev. Richard Machno Humphreys and Jane Elizabeth Humphreys, of 19, Shirley Road, Roath Park, Cardiff. He served during the war with the 121st Company, Machine Gun Corps, and was taken prisoner by the Germans at some time, probably during their offensive of 21 March 1918 onwards. Idwal survived the war but died in London just hours after arriving home following repatriation from Germany, on 11 January 1919. He was 25 years old, and was brought home for burial at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

Wilfred Sydney James, Second Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Wilfred was the son of Thomas Rees James and Margaret James, of Trebeddod House, Stradey Road, Furnace. He had been educated at Aberystwyth University before being commissioned into the 19th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France between the 1 and 9 June and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. Wilfred was killed here on 24 November 1917. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

Albert John, Bombardier, 150673, Royal Garrison Artillery. Albert was the son of William Henry and Jane John, of Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Royal Garrison Artillery, and was posted to France, where he joined the 498th Siege Battery, RGA, which was attached to the Fourth Army. Albert was wounded during the Advance on the Hindenburg Line, and died in hospital on 14 September 1918. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France.

Cledwyn Lloyd Jones, Second Lieutenant, Notts & Derby (Sherwood Foresters).  Cledwyn was the son of Richard and Annie Jones, of Hilltop, Tyrfran, Llanelli, and was commissioned from the Royal Fusiliers into the Sherwood Foresters on 30 October 1917. Cledwyn was posted to the 2/7th Battalion, which was attached to 178 Brigade, 59th (2nd North Midland) Division. In April 1916 the Division moved to Ireland, and was the first TF Division to serve there, involved in actions against the Republican Uprising of Easter 1916. During January 1917 they returned to England, and the following month landed in France. They followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and then moved north, taking part in the Battle of the Menin Road (part of the Third Battle of Ypres), and the Battle of Polygon Wood. Later that year they moved south and took part in the Battle of Cambrai. They remained in this sector over the final winter of the war, and on 21 March 1918 were one of the Divisions hit here by the German Spring Offensive, at the Battle of St Quentin. Cledwyn was killed in action here on 21 March 1918, aged 21. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Arras Memorial, France.

David Jones, Private, 31234, South Wales Borderers. David was the son of John and Mary Jones of Llanelli, and the husband of Myfanwy Jones, of 4, Arthur Street, Llanelli. He was the Llanelli publisher of the Cambria Daily Leader prior to the war, a member of Capel Als and a renowned elocutionist who had won several prizes at Eisteddfodau. David enlisted at Llanelli into the army, and was posted to France in the winter of 1916-17, joining the 10th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began on 7 July, but met with fierce resistance, and it took until 14 July to totally clear the wood. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Here they fought at the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, and the Battle of Langemarck. They then moved to Armentieres, where they remained from September 1917 until March 1918 when the German Spring Offensive was launched. The British had been over-run on the Somme, and so in April the Division was moved south, taking up positions North of Albert, from where they weathered the storm of the coming months. David was killed here on 9 May 1918. He was 36 years old, and is buried at Bouzincourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

Griffith Elphin Jones, Cadet, Mercantile Marine. Griffith was born in 1901, the son of Griffith and Catherine Jones, of Capel Newydd, Hendy, Pontarddulais. He joined the Mercantile Marine as a Cadet and served aboard the Elder-Dempster Line Steamship RMS Burutu. On 3 October 1918, Burutu was sailing through St. George's Channel, on voyage from Lagos, W. Africa to Liverpool with a general cargo, and tin ingots. In poor conditions, she was struck midships by the Glasgow registered S.S. City of Calcutta and sunk in minutes with the loss of 150 lives. Griffith was just 17 years old when he died that day, but because the ship was not a war loss, he is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Thomas Esmor Jones, Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was the son of the Reverend Evan Talfryn Jones and Annie Jones, of 10, Goring Road, Llanelli. Thomas was commissioned into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and was posted to the 4th Battalion (Denbighshire), Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was the Pioneer Battalion to the 47th (2nd London) Division. The Division moved to France during March 1915 and saw its first major action at the Battle of Aubers, and the Battle of Festubert during May 1915. They fought at the Battle of Loos in September. They were north of Arras in the spring of 1916 when the Germans attacked Vimy Ridge, and then fought at the Battle of the Somme that year. Early in 1917 the Division moved north to Belgium, and took part in the Battle of Messines, and then in November 1917 fought at the Battle of Cambrai. In March 1918 the Division were situated near St. Quentin, and faced the German Spring Offensive here on 21 March, fighting at the Battle of St Quentin, and then in the rear-guard action at the First Battle of Bapaume. Thomas was killed here on 6 April 1918. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France.

Tom Jones. Tom cannot presently be identified.

 

John Rhys Joseph, Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps. John was the son of William and Christianna Joseph, of 60, Ann Street, Llanelli. John was commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps on 20 April 1917. He was posted to Scotland with 26 Reserve Squadron, RFC, and was killed there during a flying accident on 23 April 1917. John was just 18 years old and is buried at Edinburgh (Comely Bank) Cemetery, Scotland.

John William Albert Kydd, Second Lieutenant, Lancashire Fusiliers. John was born on 17 September 1898, the son of David and Mary Helen Fraser Kydd, of Tyrfran, Llanelli. He originally enlisted into the Royal Scots, due to his mothers Scottish heritage, but was commissioned into the Lancashire Fusiliers on 31 July 1917 and posted to France where he joined the 19th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers on 4 December 1917. The battalion was the Pioneer battalion to the 49th (West Riding) Division. John joined the Division at Ypres, where it was rebuilding following the closure of the Passchendaele offensive. The Division remained in Flanders over the final winter of the war, and it was here that John was killed on 26 March 1918, while his platoon was working in the Zonnebeke sector and came under fire from German artillery. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Menin Road South Military Cemetery, Belgium.

George Albert Lewis, Private, 1895, Welsh Guards. George was the son of John and Sarah Lewis, of 40, Station Road, Burry Port. His details with the CWGC interestingly state that he was originally rejected as "unfit” and underwent an operation in Llanelli Hospital to render himself "fit". George then enlisted into the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards, attached to the 3rd Brigade, Guards Division. This Division has the distinction of being formed in France in August 1915. The various Guards units that had been with other Divisions were withdrawn to be brought together to create this fine formation. It remained on the Western Front throughout the war and saw its first major action during the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915, remaining in the area during the coming months, where they also fought in the subsequent Action of Hohenzollern Redoubt. They then spent a brief period at Ypres, and George was soon wounded. He died of wounds on 22 March 1916, and is buried at Brandhoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.

William Nunian, Private, 535001, London Regiment. William was the son of John and Margaret Nunian, of 31, Swansea Road, Llanelli, and enlisted at Hampstead into the 15th Battalion (Civil Service Rifles), London Regiment. He was later posted to the 1st/12th Battalion, London Regiment (The Rangers), attached to 168 Brigade, 56th Division. The Division fought at the diversionary attack on Gommecourt then at Ginchy, Flers and Morval, where they captured Combles. They wintered on the Somme and followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917 before fighting in the Battle of Arras. They then moved to Ypres, where they fought at Langemarck. In October they moved south, and fought at the Battle of Cambrai, which is where William was killed on 27 November 1917. He was 19 years old, and is remembered on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France. He is also remembered on his parent’s grave at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

Henry William Palmer, Corporal, 201132, Welsh Regiment. Harry was born at Walsall in 1898, the son of George and Mary Palmer. By 1901 the family had moved to Mona, Pembrey Road, Llanelli. Harry enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division and played for the School Old Boys in a charity match against the school whilst on leave in March 1915. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Harry was wounded while fighting in the Jordan Valley. He died of his wounds on 10 March 1918, aged 19, and is buried at Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel.

David Charles Phillips, Lieutenant, South Wales Borderers. David was the son of Charles and Elizabeth Phillips, of The Albion Inn, Murray Street, Llanelli. David was commissioned into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to France on 14 February 1917, where he joined the 2nd Battalion, SWB, which was attached to 87 Brigade, 29th Division. The Division took part in its first major action in France during the 1916 Somme Offensive, and fought at the Battles of Albert and Le Transloy, suffering heavy casualties. In the Spring of 1917 they fought at the Battle of the Scarpe, which was part of the Arras Offensive, and then moved further north to Ypres. David was in command of C Company at Ypres, and on 26 August 1917 the 2nd SWB launched an assault on the German positions at Langemarck. David was killed that day, while leading his men near Fourche Farm. He was 22 years old and was buried by Reverend Kenelm Swallow at Artillery Wood Cemetery, Belgium.

William Bertram Protheroe, Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps. William was born in Garnant in 1891, the son of William and Elizabeth Protheroe, and the family then moved to Delfan, Gilbert Crescent, Llanelli. He was commissioned into the 15th Welsh, the Carmarthen Pals battalion, on 3 April 1915. He landed in France with elements of the battalion on 4 December 1915 and served with the battalion until after the fighting at Mametz Wood, when he volunteered for service with the Royal Flying Corps. William gained his Pilots wings, and was promoted to Lieutenant, joining 53 Squadron, RFC in France. At 02.20 on the morning of 12 June 1917, William and his Observer, Lieutenant W. Turnbull, were flying a Photographic Reconnaissance mission over Oostaverne in their FE2b, Serial A4207, when they were spotted by Vzfw Wittekind of Jasta 28, which was commanded by Ritter Max Von Muller. The FE2b was easily out-manoeuvred by the superior German Albatross fighter, and was shot down in flames, killing both men. The bodies of William and his Observer were burnt in the wreckage, and they are commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial, France.

Ivor Guest Rees, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Ivor was the son of William and Annie Rees, of Llanelli. He worked as a clerk at the Old Castle Works prior to being commissioned into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The Battalion was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, and moved to France during July 1915, fighting at Loos in September that year. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boisselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. Ivor was wounded here and evacuated to the Base Hospital at Rouen for treatment, but sadly died of his wounds there on 5 August 1916, aged 24. He is buried at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France. His brother, Vivian Guest Rees was also killed.

John Rees, Gunner, 95284, Royal Field Artillery. John was the son of Hector and Margaret Rees of 35, Crooked Row, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Royal Field Artillery, and was posted to France with B Battery, 71st Brigade, which was attached to the 15th (Scottish) Division. John was killed during the Second Battle of the Scarpe, on 24 April 1917. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Feuchy Chapel British Cemetery, Wancourt, France.

Vivian Guest Rees, Private, 64723, Welsh Regiment. Vivian was the son of William and Annie Rees of 5, Goring Terrace, Llanelli. He worked at the National Provincial and Union Bank, at Carmarthen, and enlisted at Carmarthen in September 1916 into the 2/4th Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was then transferred to the 7th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and remained on home service. Vivian had taken ill during May 1918, and died at the VAD Hospital, at Holgate, Middlesbrough of pneumonia on 10 May 1918. He was 20 years old, and was buried at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

Tom Roberts, Lieutenant, Cheshire Regiment. Tom was the son of John Wells Roberts and Caroline Martha Roberts, of Swansea Road Nurseries, Llanelli. Tom was educated at Aberystwyth and became a teacher in London prior to the war. He gained a commission into the 3rd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, and was sent to France in March 1915, joining the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment at Ypres on 21 March. He was gassed during the Battle of Bellewaarde on 24 May 1915. Instead of remaining at the Aid Post, he returned to lead his men in the defence of a heavy German attack on their positions and was shot in the chest and leg and killed that same day. Tom was 22 years old, and is buried at Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium. He left behind a rich legacy of information in letters which he had sent to his parents, describing his experiences during his short time at the front.

Victor George Roberts, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Victor was the son of Joseph and Annie Roberts, of ‘Y Goedwig’, Lakefield Road, Llanelli. He joined the Inns of Court OTC on 2 January 1916 and was commissioned Second Lieutenant into the 4th Welsh on 28 February 1917. Victor was posted to the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the Carmarthen Pals battalion, which was in France, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. He was killed at Ypres soon after, on 27 July 1917, when the Germans fired an artillery barrage on the trenches held by the 15th Welsh. Victor was 20 years old and is buried alongside many of his comrades at Bard Cottage Cemetery, Boesinghe, Belgium.

James Roscoe Samuel, Second Lieutenant, North Staffordshire Regiment. James was born at Llanelli, the son of James and Elizabeth Samuel. The family later moved to St. Edward's Vicarage, Barnsley, Yorks. He served with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, before being commissioned into the North Staffordshire Regiment, and was posted to Mesopotamia on 4 July 1916, where he joined the 7th Battalion, North Staffs, which was attached to 39 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division. James was killed in action here on 25 January 1917. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Amara War Cemetery, Iraq.

 

Thomas Granville Stephens, Private, 4271, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of John and Elizabeth Anne Stephens, of Brynmor, Llwynhendy. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Thomas was killed in action here during the Battle of Sari Bair, on 11 August 1915. He was just 21 years old, and is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

William Herbert Parry Stephens, Corporal, 95366, Royal Field Artillery. William was the son of Frank and Martha Ann Stephens, of 34 Auckland Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Royal Field Artillery and was posted to France with ‘A’ Battery, 86th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 19th (Western) Division. William was killed near Arras on 17 April 1917. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Bailleul Road East Cemetery, St. Laurent-Blangy, France.

Cyril Vaughan Thomas, Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. Cyril was born on 28 January 1895, the son of John Henry and Sarah Jane Thomas, of Gwynfryn, College Square, Llanelli. He enlisted into the Royal Field Artillery as a Driver on 31 August 1914 and served in France from May 1915. He was commissioned into the Royal Field Artillery on 6 September 1916. Cyril moved back to France on 2 November 1916, joining the 21st Battery, 2nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 2nd Division. He was killed in action near the La Bassée Canal, during the Third Battle of the Scarpe, on 18 July 1917. Cyril was 22 years old, and is buried at Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France.

John David Vaughan, MC, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of Henry and Rachel Vaughan, of 44, Mansel Street, Burry Port. He was educated at Aberystwyth University and served with the 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they famously captured Mametz Wood. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. John was wounded here, and sadly died of wounds on 18 March 1917, aged 30. He is buried at Ferme-Olivier Cemetery, Belgium. John had been awarded the Military Cross for 'For conspicuous gallantry in action. He carried out a daring reconnaissance with great courage and determination, obtaining most valuable information.' His award was gazetted on 9 January 1917.

John Alfred Waller, Lance Corporal, S/14542, Cameron Highlanders. John was born in Bath on 19 April 1890, the second son of Alfred Percy and Emily Elizabeth Waller. His father worked for the Inland Revenue and by 1901 had moved his family to Llanelli, where his children were educated, and at some time moved the family again, to Croft House, Blairlogie, Stirling. John enlisted at Alloa into the 5th Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, which was attached to 26 Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division and landed in France with the battalion on 10 May 1915. The division moved to the Loos sector, where it saw its first major action during the opening day of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. John’s brigade had the most formidable sector of line allotted to it for the assault that day, opposite a position known as the Dump, which was guarded by the formidable Hohenzollern Redoubt. John was killed in action during the initial charge that day. The 25-year-old has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France. A brother, Philip Dudley Waller, was a former Welsh International rugby player who was killed on 14 December 1917, while a third brother, Richard Percy Waller, was killed on 22 May 1918.

 

Glynne Williams, Private, 46452, Welsh Regiment. Glynne was the son of David Richard Williams and Catherine Williams, of South Hill, Old Road, Llanelli, later of 2, Tydfil Place, Cardiff. Educated firstly at Llanelli Intermediate School, Glynne was educated at Llandovery from 1910 until 1912, and while at Llandovery, Glynne played rugby for the School XV. After leaving Llandovery, Glynne was articled to Messrs. Jones and Robatham, Chartered Accountants, Dumfries Place, Cardiff. He was a member of Clifton Street Chapel, Cardiff. In August 1916, Glynne Williams enlisted at Cardiff into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, and joined the Battalion on the Somme later that year. The Division then moved North to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines. They then fought during the Battle of the Menin Road. During the opening of an attack east of the Ypres-Comines Canal on 20 September 1917, the 9th Welsh was in Reserve at Hessian Wood. They were called up to repel a German counter-attack, and it was during the ensuing action that Glynne was killed along with 12 of his comrades, during heavy enemy shelling and machine-gun fire. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Woods Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium.

John Basil Percy Williams, Private, 19981, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. John was born at Param, West Indies, the son of Reverend William Rhys Williams and Sara Jane Williams. The family returned to Wales when John was young, and he was educated at Ystrad Meurig and Llanelli Grammar School before entering St. David's College, Lampeter on 16 October 1908. He enlisted at Llandudno late in 1914 into the 16th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to the Welsh Division (later 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division). The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began on 7 July, but met with fierce resistance, and it took until 14 July to totally clear the wood. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. John was among a batch of men attached to the 254th Tunnelling Company, Royal Engineers at Ypres, and was killed there on 25 June 1917. He was 28 years old, and is buried in Poperinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Ernest Wise, Private, 65279, Welsh Regiment. Ernest was the son of Henry James Wise and Catherine Wise, of 39, Robinson Street, Llanelli. He was a Clerk at the Great Mountain Colliery prior to the war and enlisted at Llanelli into the 59th Training Reserve battalion in February 1917. On 30 March 1918 Ernest landed in France, where he was attached to the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which had just moved to positions around Messines, after suffering heavy casualties during the German Spring offensive of 21 March 1918, attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. On 9 April 1918 the Germans launched a fresh assault on the Lys, and it was during the desperate fighting that followed, that Ernest was killed near Kemmel on 18 April 1918. He was just 18 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. His cousin, Robert Haydn Wise, also fell.

Robert Haydn Wise, Private, 368175, Royal Army Medical Corps. Robert was the son of William and Ellen Wise, of Baglan House, Pembrey Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Swansea into the Royal Army Medical Corps in October 1914 and was posted to the 1/3rd Welsh Field Ambulance, attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Robert was wounded in Palestine and died on 11 April 1918. He was 26 years old, and is buried at Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel. His cousin, Ernest Wise, also fell.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Kenneth Arthur, Private, 14676670, Welch Regiment. Kenneth was the son of David John and Jane Arthur, of Llanelli. He served with the 1/5th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division spent much of the war on home service, before landing in Normandy on 26 June 1944. They then took part in the struggle to break out of the beach head. Kenneth was one of the first casualties suffered by the 1/5th Welch as they moved up to Brouay on 30 June 1944. He was 19 years old, and is buried in St. Manvieu War Cemetery, Cheux, France.

Raymond Beresford Beard, Ordinary Signalman, D/JX 340158, Royal Navy. Raymond was the son of Francis Beresford Beard, and of Lucy Florence Beard, of Llwynhendy. He served with the Royal Navy aboard the Polish Destroyer Orkan. On 8 October 1943 Orkan was in the North Atlantic, forming part of the destroyer escort for Convoy SC-143, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-378, with the loss of 184 lives. Raymond was 20 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

David Edmund Beynon, Sergeant, 966674, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth J. Beynon. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and was posted to Canada to train under the Empire Air Training Scheme. On 21 April 1945 David was flying aboard a North American B-25 Mitchell II, Serial HD308, of 111 Operational Training Unit when it came down with the loss of all her crew. No trace of the aircraft or the crew of six was ever found, so David, who was 30 years old, is commemorated alongside his comrades on the Ottawa Memorial, Canada.

Hugh Emrys Bonnell, Major, 91409, Royal Army Medical Corps. Hugh was the son of John and Mary Bonnell, of Pwll. He was educated at the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire and at King's College Hospital, qualifying M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. in 1931. Hugh was interested in pathology and held appointments in this specialty at King's College Hospital, Manchester Royal Infirmary, and the Royal East Sussex Hospital, Hastings. Hugh met and married Catherine Swanston at Battle in 1935, before becoming pathologist to the East Ham Memorial Hospital and consulting pathologist to the Runwell Hospital, Wickford in 1937. He was commissioned on 6 June 1939 into the Royal Army Medical Corps, and was posted to Belfast, possibly with the 53rd (Welsh) Division. Hugh was killed in Belfast during a German Air Raid on 5 May 1941. He was 35 years old and was brought home for burial at Pwll (Bethlehem) Baptist Chapelyard.

Kenneth Gwynne Brown, Gunner, 1123328, Royal Artillery. Kenneth was the son of John Gwynne Brown and Ellen Maud Brown, and the husband of Enid Megan Brown, of Llanelli. He served with the 73rd Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment had served in North Africa and Italy before being recalled to Britain to prepare for the Normandy landings. Kenneth was killed while fighting in Germany on 23 February 1945. He was 25 years old, and is buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery, Germany.

 

David Edward Clement, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1417979, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of William and Elizabeth Clement, of Llangennech. He served with 177 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Bristol Beaufighter VIC, based at Phaphamau, in India. David died in India, aged 35, on 28 May 1943. He is buried at Delhi War Cemetery, India.

 

John Alan Cole, Lieutenant, Royal Australian Naval Volunteer Reserve. John was born at Llanelli on 13 February 1905, the son of John William S. and Ethel Cole. He was a master mariner prior to the war, and had emigrated to Australia, where he lived with his wife, Edna Beryl Cole, at Double Bay, New South Wales, Australia. John volunteered to serve with the Royal Australian Navy, aboard the light cruiser H.M.A.S. Sydney. On 20 November 1941, Sydney was on patrol in the Indian Ocean when she came across a merchant vessel. The vessel lured Australia in closer before opening fire on her, and the two ships commenced battle. The ship turned out to be the German cruiser Kormoran, and after a fierce battle, both ships, severely damaged, drifted apart. Sydney went down that night, with the loss of all of her crew of 645 men. John was 36 years old when he was killed on 20 November 1941, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

David Clifford Davies, Flying Officer, 177181, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of David and Mary Ann Davies, of Llanelli. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a navigator. He married Winefride Maureen Ratcliffe, of Romford, Essex, whilst on leave in 1941. David was posted to 1651 Heavy Conversion Unit at Woolfox Lodge for training aboard the Avro Lancaster and on 4 March 1945 took off from Woolfox Lodge aboard Lancaster III Serial JB699, which had been sent as part of a diversionary force to support an air raid on Germany. The Lancaster was Intercepted and shot down over Rutland by a German fighter during the night, killing all her crew. David was 31 years old and is buried in Cambridge City Cemetery, England.

 

Edgar William Davies, Sergeant, 1420122, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Edgar was the son of William Henry and Kate Augusta Davies, of Llanelli. He served as an Air Gunner, with 106 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Avro Lancaster III, and was based at RAF Metheringham. On the night of 25 November 1943, Edgar was aboard Lancaster JB592, which took off from Metheringham as part of a large bomber raid on Berlin. Early the next day, the Lancaster was shot down over Germany, killing all seven of the crew. Edgar was 22 years old and is buried alongside his crew at Durnbach War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Thomas Clifford Davies, DFM, Flight Sergeant, 580453, Royal Air Force. Thomas was the son of Thomas John and Mabel Clifford Davies, of Llanelli. He served as a Pilot with 226 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Thomas was a veteran pilot with the squadron and had flown over France during the retreat to Dunkirk in 1940 before the squadron was evacuated from Brest. The squadron converted to Blenheim’s after returning to England and began anti-shipping operations. Thomas was killed when his Blenheim IV, Serial Z7291, was shot down by flak, and crashed into the sea off Nordeney on 4 July 1941. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Sage War Cemetery, Germany. Thomas was the holder of the Distinguished Flying Medal, which had been awarded to him for operations over France in 1940. His medals surfaced in Canada in 2013 and were sold on eBay.

 

Alford Griffith Edwards, Sergeant, 961445, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Alford was the son of Albert G. Edwards and Esther J. Edwards, of Burry Port, and served with the Royal Air Force, based in India. Alford died in India on 10 October 1944. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Kirkee War Cemetery, India.

 

Hugh Vernon Edwards, Writer, D/MX 66169, Royal Navy. Hugh was the son of Albert Griffiths Edwards and Esther Jane Edwards, of Burry Port, and served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Barham. She was an old Queen Elizabeth Class Battleship, which had served in the Battle of Jutland during the Great War. In World War II she operated in the Atlantic and Mediterranean and was struck by three torpedoes from the German Submarine U-331 on 25 November 1941 and sank with the loss of 861 men. Hugh was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Melville Edwards, Marine, PO/X 4154, Royal Marines. Melville was born at Bynea on 12 May 1921. He enlisted into the Royal Marines and was posted aboard the famous battlecruiser HMS Hood. She had been built during the Great War and commissioned in 1920, becoming the most powerful warship on the seas. Following the outbreak of war Hood patrolled in the area around Iceland, hunting for German commerce raiders and blockade runners between Iceland and the Norwegian Sea. Following an overhaul, she sailed as the flagship of Force H, and participated in the destruction of the French Fleet at Mers-el-Kebir. She then returned to Scapa Flow to operate as a convoy escort. In May 1941 Hood and the battleship Prince of Wales were ordered to intercept the German battleship Bismarck and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, which were en route to the Atlantic. On 24 May 1941 the great ships met in the Denmark Strait and began to exchange fire. Hood was struck by several German shells, exploded and sank within three minutes, with the loss of all but three of her crew of over 1,300 men. Melville had only just turned 20 years old when he was killed that day and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire.

 

Thomas Elwyn Edwards, Sergeant, 1312326, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of James Thomas Edwards and Catherine C. Edwards, of Llangennech, and the husband of Dorothy B. Edwards, of Llangennech. He served with 57 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Scampton. On 9 November 1942, Thomas was aboard a Lancaster which formed part of a 213-bomber raid over Hamburg. Twenty-six fires were caused in the city by the bombing, but fifteen bombers were lost during the mission. Thomas was aboard one of the missing aeroplanes that day. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Douglas Evans, Private, 14427609, Welch Regiment. Douglas was the son of Gwilym and Elizabeth Mary Evans, of Llanelli. He served with the 1/5th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division had spent most of the war on home service before landing at Normandy at the end of June 1944. It then took part in the break out from the beach head and the fighting around Caen. Douglas was killed during the capture of Fresney le Vieux on 16 August 1944. He was 18 years old, and is buried in Ranville War Cemetery, France.

Emrys Evans, Pilot Officer, 119172, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Emrys was born in Whitland, the son of Gwilym Evans, a railway worker from Laugharne, and his wife Anne Evans. By 1911 the family was living at 31, Fron Terrace, Llanelli. Emrys had graduated from University with a B.Sc. from the Welsh Board of Education and had begun teaching at Whitland Grammar School before enlisting into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, joining 156 Squadron as an Air Gunner. 156 Squadron was formed at Alconbury in 1942 as a medium bomber squadron, flying the Vickers Wellington Mark III, and operated with No. 3 Group. Emrys was commissioned into the Squadron from Flight Sergeant on 21 March, 1942. On 30 May, 1942 a massive raid was launched by Bomber Command on Cologne. 1,047 aircraft took to the sky, amongst them was the Wellington X3598 in which Emrys served, under the command of Pilot Officer Bain D.F.C. 898 aircraft managed to drop their deadly cargoes on the city, causing terrible fires, before turning around and heading for home. Emrys and his crew were intercepted and shot down over Holland on the return journey, at 00.35 on the morning of 31 May 1942. Emrys and his five other crew-mates died in the crash, aged 25 and is buried at Bergen-Op-Zoom War Cemetery.

Harold Lloyd Evans, Lieutenant, 253650, Royal Welch Fusiliers. Harold was born in Llanelli early in 1920. He married Henrietta McCree, of 234, Bushbury Road, Fallings Park, Wolverhampton in 1942. Harold had been commissioned into the Royal Welch Fusiliers, but after being posted to the Far East was attached to the Headquarters of the 2nd West African Infantry Brigade, R.W.A.F.F. Harold died in Burma on 15 March 1945, aged 25, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar. His widow Henrietta later moved to Carmarthen, before marrying again and moving to Llanelli.

Trevor Evans, Gunner, 3961234, Royal Artillery. Trevor was the son of Daniel Phillip and Hannah Evans, of Llanelli. He served with 99 (The Royal Bucks Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. Trevor served in France with the BEF and took part in the fighting retreat to Dunkirk in May 1940. Trevor's body must have been found in January 1941, as his date of death is shown as being sometime between 28 May 1940 and 5 January 1941. He was 22 years old, and is buried in Merville Communal Cemetery Extension, France. His brother, Ronald James Evans, was killed in August 1944.

Arnold Lawrence Falconbridge, Private, S/108399, Royal Army Service Corps. Arnold was born in London in 1917. He enlisted into the Royal Army Service Corps and married Bernice Jones, of Llanelli, in 1940 just prior to embarking for France with the BEF. Arnold was killed on 17 June 1940, possibly at sea whilst being evacuated off Dunkirk. The 23-year-old has no known grave and is commemorated on the Dunkirk Memorial, France.

 

Arthur Charles Gravelle, Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. Arthur was born at Pembrey in 1908, the son of David John Gravelle, and of Agnes Mildred Gravelle. He had served with the Royal Naval Reserve for several years prior to the war, and after his father's death in 1917, his mother moved to Cheam, Surrey. Arthur served aboard H.M.S. Manistee, which was a converted merchant steamer, lightly armed with four guns. On 24 February 1941, Manistee was part of Convoy OB-288 which had dispersed in the Atlantic, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine U107, with the loss of all of her crew of 140 men. Arthur was 32 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Devon. He is commemorated on his parent’s grave at Pembrey (St. Illtyd) Churchyard.

Myrddin Gray, Sergeant, 1499067, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Myrddin was the son of David and Rachel Gray of Llanelli. He worked as an invoice clerk at the Llanelli Tinplate prior to the war and married Elsie Irene Jones in 1936. Myrddin enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as an air bomber before being posted to 77 Squadron, RAF. The squadron was a bomber unit equipped with the Handley Page Halifax, based at RAF Elvington. Myrddin had a close escape on the night of 24-25 June 1943 when his Halifax, Serial JB852 was damaged by flak and set alight, but ejected its bomb load and managed to return to Elvington airfield. On 13 August 1943 Myrddin took off from Elvington aboard Halifax JD125, which was attached to a force ordered to bomb Milan. The Halifax crashed in France, killing all her crew. Myrddin was 36 years old when he died during the crash and is buried alongside his crew-members in Verneuil-Sur-Avre Communal Cemetery, France.

Spencer Harold Arthur Henwood, Supply Assistant, D/MX80773, Royal Navy. Spencer was born on 14 September 1922, the son of Harold John and Sarah Lily Henwood, of Sandy, Llanelli. He served with the Royal Navy aboard the battleship HMS Renown. Spencer had served aboard Renown during the hunt for the Graf Spee in 1939, and for the Bismarck in 1940. After spending much of 1941 at Gibraltar, Renown returned to Scotland to provide cover for the Arctic Convoys. Spencer died of meningitis aboard HM Hospital Ship Isle of Jersey in Scotland on 27 June 1942, aged 19, and is buried in Lyness Royal Naval Cemetery, Scotland. The photograph is courtesy of the Scottish War Graves Project.

Eric John Norman Howell, Sergeant, 1653086, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Eric was the son of John Henry and Evelyn Howell, of Burry Port, and served as an air gunner with 40 Squadron, Royal Air Force. The Squadron was equipped with the Vickers Wellington X, based at RAF Foggia Main, Italy after the invasion of Italy in 1943. Eric was killed when his Wellington was shot down over southern France on 10 May 1944. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Mazargues War Cemetery, Marseilles, France.

Brinley Huggan, Sergeant, 573249, Royal Air Force. Brinley was the son of Sam and Emma Huggan, of Bryn Mill, Glamorgan. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force and was posted as a flight engineer to 51 Squadron, RAF, which was a heavy bomber unit and operated the Handley Page Halifax from its base at RAF Snaith. Brinley and his crew were fortunate to survive a raid over Dusseldorf on 11 June 1943 when their Halifax, Serial HR731, was hit by three flak bursts but her pilot, Anthony Osmond, managed to bring the crippled aircraft back to Snaith. Later that month, on 26 June 1943, the same crew took off from Snaith aboard Halifax HR731, which had been repaired, and joined a large formation of bombers which had been despatched to bomb Gelsenkirchen. Brinley’s Halifax was intercepted by a German night-fighter and crashed into the Ijsselmeer, north-east of Harderwijk, on the return journey that night, killing all her crew. Brinley, who was 22 years old, has no known grave and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. The bodies of three of the crew were later recovered from Ijsselmeer and buried.

 

Garth Huws-Jones, Third Radio Officer, 208240, Naval Auxiliary Personnel (Merchant Navy). Garth was the son of the Revd. David Huws Jones and Gertrude Huws Jones, of Llanelli. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard the ocean boarding vessel HMS Crispin. On 4 February 1941 Crispin sunk after having been hit by a torpedo on the previous night, which had been fired by the German submarine U-107. Garth was among 20 men lost in the sinking. He was 19 years old and is commemorated on the Liverpool Naval Memorial.

Lewis Reginald Isaac, Sergeant, 748158, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Reg was the son of James and Blodwen Matilda Isaac, of Llanelli. He served as a pilot with 64 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a fighter unit, equipped with the Supermarine Spitfire I, based at RAF Kenley. On 5 August 1940 Reg was sent up with his Spitfire, Serial L1029, with five other fighters of 64 Squadron, to escort a convoy which was steaming through the English Channel. German bombers were spotted heading towards the convoy, and while the Spitfires were intent on hunting down the bombers, they were attacked by German Messerschmitt fighters. Reg was shot down over the channel during the dogfight that followed. He was 24 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Donald Jeremiah, MID, Squadron Leader, 40395, Royal Air Force. Donald was the son of Emlyn and Olwen Jeremiah, of St. Pauls, Llanelli, and the husband of Pauline Jeremiah. He was a pilot, and became a Squadron Leader with 297 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew secret SOE missions. Donald died in Bermuda on 11 January 1944, aged 24, and is buried in Nassau War Cemetery, Bermuda.

 

Barry Pugh Jones, Corporal, 653301, Royal Air Force. Barry was the son of William Horace and Lily Jones, of Llanelli. He served in the Far East with the Royal Air Force. Barry was captured at Java by the Japanese and arrived at the notorious Sandakan Camp in April 1943. Barry died in captivity on 15 April 1945, aged 24, and was originally buried in Sandakan. His grave was removed to Labuan War Cemetery, Malaysia after the war. The photograph below has been kindly supplied by Tony Beck.

Harry Gwyn Jones, Flying Officer, 44881, Royal Air Force. Harry was the son of Arthur Gwyn Jones and Annie Gwyn Jones, of Llanelli, and the husband of Mary Jones, of Llanelli. He served as a pilot with 129 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Supermarine Spitfire VB, and was based at RAF Thorney Island. Harry was lost on an anti-shipping operation on 19 August 1942. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Ivor Mansel Jones, Leading Aircraftman, 1709138, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Ivor was the son of Mansel and Rachel Ann Jones, of Llanelli. He served with the Royal Air Force and was sailing for Belgium aboard LST 420 when it struck a mine and sank off the Belgian coast on 7 November 1944, with heavy loss of life. Ivor was 21 years old when he died that day, and is buried in Blankenberge Town Cemetery, Belgium.

Terence Rosser Jones, Second Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. Terence was the son of Mrs. E. S. Jones, of Llanelli, and the nephew of Mrs. R. M. Rosser, of Llanelli. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the M.V. Lady Glanely, a Cardiff registered merchant ship. On 2 December 1940, Lady Glanely was on route from Vancouver to London, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-101. Terence was 17 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Maldwyn Herbert Lee, Leading Aircraftman, 1316626, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Maldwyn was the son of David and Alice Lee, and the husband of Margaret J. Lee, of Dafen. He served with the Royal Air Force at Malta. Maldwyn died, probably in an air crash into the sea, on 19 June 1944. He was 28 years old, and is commemorated on the Malta Memorial, Malta.

Thomas Owen Lewis, Sergeant, 970474, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of Thomas John Lewis and Myfanwy Ceinwen Lewis (nee Evans), of Gwynfa, Halfway, Llanelli. He served with 209 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a Coastal Command unit equipped with the Saro Lerwick, based at Invergordon. On 22 February 1941 Thomas was flying as one of the 14-man crew of Saro Lerwick Serial L7263 when it went missing whilst on convoy escort duties off the Scottish coast. Thomas was 20 years old when he died that day and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey. He is also commemorated on his parent’s grave in Llanelli.

 

Eric Allan Lloyd, Sergeant, 946978, Royal Air Force. Eric was the son of David and Hannah Lloyd, of Llanelli. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 18 Squadron, Royal Air force, which flew the Bristol Blenheim IV from RAF Oulton. On 25 May 1941 Eric was flying aboard Blenheim R3666 on an anti-shipping flight, when the aircraft was attacked by an Me109. Eric was mortally wounded and died that same day. He was 20 years old and is buried in Llanelli Church Cemetery.

Bernard Ewart Longhurst, Flight Sergeant, 1651990, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Bernard was the son of David and Morfwdd E. Longhurst, of Llanelli. He served with 61 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Avro Lancaster II from RAF Skellingthorpe. On the night of 21 November 1944 Bernard took off from Skellingthorpe as a crewman aboard Lancaster NG179, which was part of a force sent to bomb the U-Boat pens at Trondheim. Bernard was posted as killed when his Lancaster failed to return the following morning of 22 November. He was 21 years old and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

William Merriman, Warrant Officer Class II, 3961261, Welch Regiment. William was born in the Llandilofawr district in 2920. He married Moira Elizabeth Owens, of Llanelli, in 1941. William served with the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment, which was the local Territorial battalion, attached to the 158th Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The division initially moved to Northern Ireland following the outbreak of war but returned to England where it spent much of the war before embarking for Normandy at the end of June 1944 in order to assist in the break-out from the Normandy beach-head. Following fierce fighting in the Bocage, the division took part in the advance through northern France into Belgium and Holland and saw action in Operation Market Garden before pushing towards the German frontier, playing a part in the Battle of the Bulge. William was killed near the River Weser on 11 April 1945, aged 26. He is buried in Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany.

              

Douglas Allenby Morgan, Private, 7607332, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Douglas was the son of Thomas David and Eliza Lenden Morgan, of Llanelli. He served with 4 Base Ordnance Depot, Royal Army Ordnance Corps, which was in France with the BEF when the Germans attacked France on 10 May 1940. Douglas was killed during the retreat to Dunkirk on 20 May 1940, aged 22. He is commemorated on the Dunkirk Memorial, France.

Iorwerth Beynon Morgan, Sergeant, 1322390, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Iorwerth was the son of William Rees Morgan and Mary Catherine Morgan, of Llanelli. He served with 103 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Avro Lancaster III from RAF Elsham Wolds. Iorwerth died on 27 November 1943, aged 22, and is buried in Llanelli (Box) Cemetery.

 

John Desmond Morris, Sergeant, 1652943, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Hector and Sarah Jane Morris, of Llanelli. He served with 630 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Avro Lancaster III from RAF East Kirkby. John was killed when his Lancaster was brought down over Germany on 22 January 1944. He was 21 years old and was buried alongside his crew in Berlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery, Germany.

 

William Harold Owens, Sergeant, 131677, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was born on 6 June 1919, the son of George and Mary Jane Owens, of Penderi, Llannon. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a Navigator before being posted to 248 Squadron, RAF, which was equipped with the Bristol Beaufighter, based at Predannack. William was killed on 8 March 1943 when his Beaufighter VI, Serial EL264, crashed in Cornwall. His pilot, Sergeant A. L. Chisholme, was injured but survived. William was 23 years old when he died that day and is buried in Llannon (St. Non) Churchyard, Carmarthenshire.

Harold Phillips. Harold cannot presently be identified.

 

Jacob Phillips, L.R.C.P., M.R.C.S, Lieutenant, 260690, Royal Army Medical Corps. Jacob was the son of Morris Lloyd Phillips and Elizabeth Jane Phillips, of Loughor. He trained as a Doctor prior to the war and was commissioned into the Royal Army Medical Corps on 13 February 1943. He embarked by train for Glasgow, and on 8 July 1943 sailed from Glasgow aboard HMS California, as part of Convoy Faith, bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone. On 11 July 1943 the convoy was about 300 miles west of Vigo, Spain, when it was attacked by three Focke-Wulf FW200 aircraft from Bordeaux. Jacob was among 46 men killed during the attack, which forced the Royal Navy to torpedo the California after the survivors had been rescued. Jacob was 28 years old when he was killed on 11 July 1943, and is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey.

 

Lincoln Thomas Beynon Phillips, Sergeant, 1253989, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Lincoln was the son of Sidney and Edith Phillips, and the husband of Lilian Phillips, of Loughor. He served with 70 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a transport squadron, based in the Middle East, and equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Lincoln died in Egypt on 7 July 1942, aged 27. He is buried in Ismailia War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

John Owen S. Picton, Flight Sergeant, 1836107, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of Thomas Owen Picton and Margaret Picton, of Burry Port, and served with 189 Squadron, Royal Air Force as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner. The Squadron was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Fulbeck. John died when his Lancaster was shot down over Germany on 7 March 1945. He was 19 years old, and is buried at Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Edmund Toulmin Rees, Sergeant, 1653111, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Edmund was the son of Ernest Morgan Rees and Sarah Jane Rees (nee Toulmin), of Bynea. His father had served with the Welsh Regiment during the Great War, but Edmund decided on joining the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and was posted to North Africa with 78 Operational Training Unit. He was killed in Libya on 3 November 1944, aged 21, possibly during the crash of a Douglas Baltimore V. Edmund is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Libya.

 

Iorwerth John Rees, Private, 14821436, Welch Regiment. Iorwerth was the son of David and Beatrice Rees, of Llanelli, and the husband of June Rees, of Llanelli. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Welch Regiment. The battalion was in India at the outbreak of war, and remained in the Far East, Iorwerth was killed when a convoy he was travelling in was ambushed by the Japanese on 28 July 1945. He was 20 years old, and is buried in Rangoon War Cemetery, Myanmar.

William Richard Rees, MID, Staff Sergeant, 7608876, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. William was the son of John and Gwenllian Rees, of Pembrey, and served with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. William had been Mentioned in Despatches at some time during the war, and died in Egypt on 9 January 1944, aged 25. He is buried at Kantara War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Edward George Reynolds, Lieutenant, 122028, Royal Army Medical Corps. Edward was the son of Rees George Reynolds and Despoina Reynolds, of Compton House, Burry Port. The family bought a hotel at Beadon Prior, Salcombe and had moved there prior to the war. Edward was commissioned into the Royal Army Medical Corps. Very little is known of him, but he died in Chelmsford Hospital on 4 March 1940, aged 27. He is buried in Salcombe Cemetery, Devon.

 

David Bowen Richards, Gunner, 1123290, Royal Artillery. David was born at Llanelli in 1921, the son of David H. Richards and Blodwen Richards. The family later moved to Bristol. He served with 28 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. David was killed during the Axis assault around Gazala on 6 June 1942. He was 21 years old, and is buried in Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Acroma, Libya.

 

David Stanley Richards, Flight Sergeant, 1314457, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of William Emrys and Annie Richards, of Llanelli, and the husband of Elma Doreen Richards, of Llanelli. He served as a Wireless Operator/ Air Gunner with 207 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at RAF Spilsby. David died when his Lancaster was shot down over Germany during a raid on the morning of 12 September 1944. He was 21 years old and is buried alongside his fellow crewmen in Durnbach War Cemetery, Germany.

                                            

Mervyn John Rees Ryan, Sergeant, 1386032, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Mervyn was the son of David Ryan, and of Esther Mary Ryan, of Llanelli, and served with the Royal Air Force. Mervyn trained as a Pilot aboard an Airspeed Oxford, at Alberta, Canada, before returning to Britain to take up a posting. Mervyn was reported as missing on 12 July 1943. It was not until May 1944 that he was reported as being believed killed on that date. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Robert Saunders. Robert cannot presently be identified.

 

Alexander Macdonald Smith, Second Lieutenant, 99738, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers. Alexander was the son of Alex and Ada Macdonald Smith, of Pembrey, and served with the 7th Battalion, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers. The Battalion served as a Machine Gun unit, attached to the 51st (Highland) Division, which was stationed in France on the Maginot Line in 1940. They had thus escaped being encircled with the rest of the BEF at Dunkirk and was then pulled back to the west of Northern France, where it was attached to the French 10th Army. For some time, it was forced to hold a line four times longer than that which would normally be expected of a division. During this period, the 154th Brigade was detached and withdrawn successfully. However, 152 and 153 Brigade were trapped at Saint-Valéry-en-Caux and surrendered on 12 June 1940. Alexander was killed that very day of the surrender of the Battalion. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Houdetot Churchyard, France.

William Kenneth Stephens, Aircraftman 2nd Class, 1072395, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. William was the son of Edgar and May Stephens, of Llanelli. He served with 27 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which flew the Bristol Blenheim IF, and was based in Malaysia, at Sungei Patani. William was killed during the Japanese invasion of Malaya on 8 December 1941. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore.

Thomas Hugh Thomas, Sergeant, 1284757, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was the son of Brinley James Thomas and Gertrude Thomas, of Llanelli. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and was posted to 40 Squadron, RAF, which was a night bomber unit, initially based at RAF Wyton. On the evening of 14 January 1942 Thomas took off from RAF Alconbury aboard Wellington X 9742 of 40 Sqn RAF took off from Alconbury, Huntingdon for bombing operations against Hamburg. The aircraft sent out an SOS soon afterwards, reporting engine failure and came down in the North Sea, killing all her crew of six. No trace of Thomas or his crew was ever found, so the 20-year-old is commemorated alongside his comrades on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

Douglas West, Private, 1494432, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Douglas was the son of John and Eleanor West, of Llanelli. He served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The battalion spent most of the war in India. Douglas was returning home aboard a Consolidated Liberator VI, Serial KH125, when the aircraft was hit by lightning while flying over Rochefort, France, and lost a wing. The aircraft crashed into the ground near the town, killing all 28 passengers and crew who were aboard. Douglas was 27 years old when he died in the crash and is buried besides the other casualties in Rochefort-Sur-Mer Naval Cemetery, France.

 

Wilfred Edwin White, Driver, 2068052, Royal Engineers. Wilfred was the son of Edwin Alfred and Winifred Maude White, of Llanelli. He served with the 234th Field Company, Royal Engineers. The company landed in Normandy on D-Day. Wilfred was killed a month later, when a German rocket shell hit his units position near Byeville Woods on 7 July 1944. He was 25 years old, and is buried in La Delivrande War Cemetery, Douvres, France.

Gareth Williams. Gareth cannot presently be identified.

 

Brian Howard Helps Wilson, Flight Sergeant, 978875, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Brian was the son of Sydney and Annie Tegwedd Wilson, of Llanelli. He served with 500 Squadron, RAF, which was a Coastal Command unit, based at RAF St Eval, and flew the Lockheed Hudson V. Brian was killed when his Hudson was lost on a patrol on 8 September 1942. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

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Website News

14 Nov 2018. Great news today that another four Welsh soldiers have been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research: Godfrey Dorey, of Neath; John Garvin, of Pontypool; Stanley Griffiths, of Swansea; and William Price, of Abergavenny. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

13 Nov 2018. More great news, the CWGC have accepted another Welsh soldier for commemoration today as a result of my work: Thomas John Hale, of Newport, Mon. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

10 Nov 2018. Great news today that another three Welsh soldiers have been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my work: Richard Charles, of Neath; David Evan Gough, of Merthyr; and William Jones, of Rhyl. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

19 Oct 2018. Some more great news today, after having received confirmation that another three Welsh soldiers have been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research: Archibald Casswell; Sidney Coker; and Thomas John Joseph, all Swansea men. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

17 Oct 2018. Some great news again today after having received confirmation that another four Welsh servicemen have been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research: Samuel Brooks, of Swansea; David Humphreys, of Pontypool; David Jenkin Jones, of Llwydcoed; and Tudor Emlyn Jones, of Swansea. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

16 Oct 2018. Have today received confirmation that another Welsh serviceman has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research: William Henry Lippitt, of Llanhilleth. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

12 Oct 2018. Some great news today that another two Welsh soldiers have been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research:  David Morgan Jenkins, of Swansea; and Jenkin Robert Lewis, of Llanelli. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

6 Mar 2018. Some more good news today that yet another Welsh soldier, Thomas David Rees, of Whitchurch, Cardiff, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

3 Mar 2018. Good news today that another Welsh soldier, Reginald Wilfred Collard, of Whitchurch, Cardiff, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

26 Feb 2018. The second volume of my latest book 'The Welsh at War' has been published today and is available from all good bookshops. Please see the Steve's Books page for details.

 

23 Feb 2018. Some good news today that another local man, Gwilym Bennett, of Llanelli, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

5 Feb 2018. The first volume of my latest book 'The Welsh at War' has been published today and is available from all good bookshops. Please see the Steve's Books page for details.

 

27 Jan 2018. Some good news again, that Thomas Arthur Edward Pugsley, of Ynysboeth, has recently been accepted by the CWGC for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

22 Jan 2018. I have received news that a sailor from Swansea, James Carne, who I had researched, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

1 December 2017. A new section has been added to the website, which will cover some war memorials in Glamorgan, more especially the memorials nearest to the county border with Carmarthenshire. More will be added as time allows.

 

4 November 2017. Some good news this week following the discovery, after much searching, of the grave of Private Thomas Davies, of Laugharne. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers page of the website for details.

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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