West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Felinfoel War Memorial

Felinfoel is a small village that borders the town of Llanelli, and is famous as being the home of the Felinfoel Brewery. The War Memorial is located within Holy Trinity Churchyard, in the form of a Celtic cross, and commemorates the men of the village who lost their lives during the Boer War, the Great War, and World War Two. These men are commemorated below.

Boer War, 1899-1902

 

Joseph Davies, Corporal, 2109, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Joseph was born at Llanelli in 1869, the son of William and Jane Davies. He married Dora Ann Lloyd of Felinfoel on 15 October 1899, prior to sailing for South Africa with the 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Joseph was killed in action during the Welsh Regiment’s successful assault on the strongly defended Boer position at Driefontein on 10 March 1900. He is buried at Driefontein, Bosrand. Joseph is commemorated on the new war memorial at Five Roads.

 

Richard Howell, Corporal, 248, Diamond Fields Horse. Richard was from Felinfoel, and was the son of David and Margaret Howell, of the Hope and Anchor, Llanelli. He was among 19 men killed in action at Carters Ridge, Kimberley on 28 November 1899. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Kimberley, and commemorated on the Honoured Dead Memorial. Richard is also commemorated on the Carmarthen Boer War Memorial and the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

John Arthur Dade, Private, 15459, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. John was born at Nottingham in 1893, the son of Samuel and Annie Dade. The family had lived at Llandeilo for several years before moving to Bank Cottage, Felinfoel. John enlisted into the 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 76 Brigade, 3rd Division. One of the first Divisions to move to France, the 3rd Division remained on the Western Front throughout the war, and fought during the opening Battle of Mons, and in the epic retreat, from the Rearguard Action of Solesmes, through the Battle of Le Cateau, and down to the Marne, where the German Offensive was stopped. They followed the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line, where they met them in battle, and stopped the advance on Paris. The Division then moved north to Flanders, and took part in the Battle of La Bassée, and at the Battle of Messines, which were a prelude to the First Battle of Ypres. They took part in the famous Christmas Truce on 25 December 1914 and remained at Ypres throughout the winter. In 1915 the Division saw action at Bellewaarde and Hooge, and took part in the Second attack on Bellewaarde, and in 1916 fought at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. They were then moved south to the Somme, where they were to take part in the great Battle of the Somme, and fought there at the Battle of Albert, and at the Battle of Bazentin, where they captured Longueval. John was wounded on the Somme, and brought back to the Casualty Clearing Station at Corbie, where he died of his wounds on 21 August 1916. He was 23 years old, and is buried at La Neuville British Cemetery, Corbie, France. John is not listed on the Felinfoel Memorial.

Trevor Daniel, Private, 202975, Welsh Regiment. Trevor was the son of Griffith and Mary Ann Daniel, of Ivy Cottage, Felinfoel, and he enlisted at Llanelli into the 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they famously captured Mametz Wood during July 1916. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Here they fought at Pilckem and Langemarck, then moved to Armentieres, where they remained from September 1917 until March 1918, when the German Spring Offensive was launched. The British had been over-run on the Somme, and so in April the Division was moved South, taking up positions North of Albert, from where they weathered the storm of the coming months, until the war turned during the Battle of Amiens, on 8 August 1918. The Germans had now lost the upper hand, and the British regained the lost ground on the Somme after an attack which began on 21 August 1918, with the 38th Welsh in the midst of the attack during the Battle of Albert, and then moving east, where they fought at the Battle of Bapaume. Trevor was killed in action here on 3 September 1918. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Fins New British Cemetery, Sorel-Le-Grand, France.

Henry Davies, Private, 13151, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Henry was the son of William and Mary Davies, of 14, Adulam Row, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division crossed to France during July 1915, and moved to positions north of Loos, where they took part in the opening assault of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. Henry was killed in action here that day. He was 37 years old, and is remembered on the Loos Memorial, France.

James Davies, MM, Lance Corporal, Deal/3477/S, Royal Marines. James was born at Port Talbot on 21 July 1886. Prior to the war he resided with his wife Elizabeth Davies, at Glyncelyn, Felinfoel. He enlisted on 9 February 1915 into the RM Medical Unit, and was posted to the 3rd (RN) Field Ambulance, Royal Naval Division. The division moved to Egypt preparatory to the Gallipoli campaign, and landed on 25 April 1915. After the evacuation of Gallipoli, the Division was transferred from the Admiralty to the War Office, and was redesignated the 63rd (Royal Naval) Division on 19 July 1916 after having moved to France in May 1916. The division moved to positions on the Somme, where it took part in the Battle of the Ancre, and the resulting Operations on the Ancre. In April 1917 the Division were at Arras, and fought at the Second Battle of the Scarpe, where they captured Gavrelle. They then fought at the Battle of Arleux, before moving north to Ypres, where they took part in the Second Battle of Passchendaele. Their next major action was at Cambrai, during the Action of Welch Ridge, and they were still in the area when the Germans launched their Spring Offensive, and fought at the Battle of St Quentin, and then the First Battle of Bapaume. In August, the Division took part in the Battle of Albert, which marked the beginning of the great offensive which was to end the war. They then fought at the Battle of Drocourt-Queant, the Battle of the Canal du Nord and the Battle of Cambrai, before forcing the Passage of the Grand Honelle. James sadly died of the influenza epidemic that swept through Europe at the end of the war, on 20 November 1918. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, France. He had been awarded the Military Medal during the Somme Offensive for; 'He displayed great courage and energy in removing patients from a position which was being heavily shelled to one of greater safety on 14 November 1916 near the River Ancre'. James is not named on the Felinfoel Memorial.

Daniel Morgan Evans, Private, 14878, South Wales Borderers. Daniel was the son of William and Elizabeth Evans, of 2, Salem Road, Felinfoel. He had served from the age of 16, in the 1st Welsh, then the Royal Marines and the Royal Navy. At the outbreak of the Great War he re-enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division had been one of the first to arrive in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and taking part in the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, and at Chivy, before being moved North to Ypres. Here they fought at the First Battle of Ypres, where they again stopped the German Offensive, before wintering in Flanders. Daniel was killed in action here, during the Defence of Givenchy, on 21 December, 1914. He was 31 years old, and is remembered on the Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg L'Avoue, France. His widow Catherine had remarried in 1917, becoming Catherine Siddell, of 33, Greengate Street, Carnarvon. She was widowed soon after, and remarried in 1925. Daniel is not named on the Felinfoel Memorial.

Herbert Ronald Evans, Acting Sergeant, C/1238, Kings Royal Rifle Corps. Hubert was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Evans, of 8, Nevil's Terrace, Dafen. He was a Tinworker prior to the war and enlisted at Llanelli into the Kings Royal Rifle Corps. Hubert was later transferred into the Kings African Rifles, and died of sickness in East Africa on 24 April 1918. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Pemba Cemetery, Mozambique.

Joseph Evans, Private, L/15904, Middlesex Regiment. Joseph resided at Penygaer, Dafen, and enlisted there into the Royal Hussars. He later transferred into the 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, which had landed at Havre as Lines of Communication Troops on 11 August 1914. On 22 August, 1914 they were attached to 19th Brigade, forming at Valenciennes, and on 12 October moved with 19th Brigade, to the 6th Division. On 31 May 1915 they again moved, to the 27th Division, and by 19 August were with the 2nd Division at Loos. Here they took part in the opening assault of the Battle of Loos,  near Cambrin, on 25 September 1915. Joseph was killed in action this day, and is buried at Cambrin Churchyard Extension, France.

Alban Henry Gaunt, Private, CMT/377, Royal Army Service Corps. Henry was the son of George and Harriet Gaunt, of Burton Joyce, Nottinghamshire. He had resided at Haverfordwest prior to 1907, and married Jessie Evelina John in 1907. The couple then spent periods living at Skewen, Coedfranc and at Swansea and Felinfoel prior to the outbreak of war, with Henry working as a Driver for Buckleys Breweries. When war erupted, Henry enlisted at Llanelli as a Driver with the Base M.T. Depot, Army Service Corps. Jessie by now had moved with their children to The Bull Inn, Prendergast, Haverfordwest, to be back with her family. Henry moved to France with the BEF at the outbreak of war, and was wounded by shell fragments at the Battle of Mons. He died of wounds on 24 August 1914, aged 28. Henry has no known grave, and is commemorated on the La Ferte-Sous-Joarre Memorial, France. Jessie remarried twice afterwards, and died in Staffordshire in 1953.

Edgar Griffiths, Private. Edgar was probably the son of James and Elizabeth Griffiths, of Penygaer Isaf, Felinfoel. He looks to have survived the war, but died at Llanelli early in 1920.

Ivor Samuel Griffiths, Private, 20499, Welsh Regiment. Ivor was the son of William and Mary Ann Griffiths, of 10, Glanyrafon Row, Felinfoel, and had enlisted at Llanelli into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion, which was trained at Rhyl, before landing in France in December 1915 attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had familiarised into trench warfare around Fleurbaix, and Givenchy. In June 1916 they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began on 7 July 1916, but met with fierce resistance, so the Welshmen were withdrawn, and after a change in Commanding Officer, a fresh attack was launched on 10 July 1916. Ivor was killed in action during heavy hand to hand fighting within Mametz Wood, on 11 July 1916. He was just 19 years old, and is buried at Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz, France.

Robert Griffiths, Private, 73685, Welsh Regiment. Robert was the son of John and Jane Griffiths, of 17, Long Road, Felinfoel. He was a collier prior to enlisting on 4 February 1916 into the Welsh Regiment. Robert landed in France on 3 October 1918, joining the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the Carmarthen pals battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The division had been in France since December 1915, and had fought at Mametz Wood and Pilckem Ridge. The division began its part in the great offensive by crossing the flooded River Ancre on 21 August 1918, and over the coming days pushed the Germans back across the old Somme battlefields of 1916, towards the Canal du Nord. A short rest period ensued, during which time the Canal du Nord was breached, so opening a passage through the Hindenburg Line. The Division then fought at the Battle of Beaurevoir, and moved up towards Cambrai, capturing Villers-Outreaux, before advancing to the river Selle, where the 15th Welsh again afforded a river crossing, under heavy fire. Robert was killed here on 20 October 1918, aged 32, and is buried at Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery, France.

John Edwin Howell, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of John and Anne Howell, of Pantymeillion Farm, Llanelli, and had originally served with the Pembroke Yeomanry since enlisting in 1909. At the outbreak of war he had been commissioned into the Welsh Regiment. He was posted to the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began by an attack by the 16th Welsh on 7 July 1916, but met with fierce resistance, and the attack was temporarily delayed. John was killed in action during this initial assault on Mametz Wood, on 7 July 1916. He was 23 years old, and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

David John Hughes, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. David was born in Pwll, Llanelli on 14 August 1892, the son of David and Betsy Hughes. He had served with the South African Heavy Artillery before being commissioned into the 3rd Welsh on 9 December 1915. David then returned home and was married, living briefly with his wife Muriel Hughes, at 26, College Hill, Llanelli. He was promoted Lieutenant on 1 July 1917 and was posted to the 13th Welsh on 7 August 1918. On arrival in France he was re-posted to the 15th Welsh, the Carmarthen Pals battalion, joining them from the Reinforcement Depot at Rouen on 1 September 1918. David was put in Command of D Company upon joining the Battalion and was wounded by bullets in both thighs while leading them at Dessart Wood on 18 December 1918. He returned home for treatment, but died in Llanelli on 8 March 1921, aged 28, and is buried at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

 

Frederick George Jayne, Sergeant, 4438, Welsh Regiment. Frederick was the son of Frederick William and Sarah Ann Jayne, of Crumlin, Coleshill Terrace, Llanelli. He married Sarah Giles in 1912, and the couple lived at 7, Birdin Terrace, Felinfoel. Frederick enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which had formed locally during August 1914 and were then attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July 1915, and landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli via Mudros on 9 August 1915. Here they immediately faced the chaotic leadership that was to lead to the ultimate failure of the campaign, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack. Frederick was wounded here during the Battle of Sari Bair, and died of wounds aboard a Hospital Ship on 11 August 1915, aged 33. He was buried at sea, and so he is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli. Sarah died in 1934. His brother, Walter Havard Joseph Jayne also fell.

 

Cledwyn Lloyd Jones, Second Lieutenant, Notts & Derby (Sherwood Foresters).  Cledwyn was the son of Richard and Annie Jones, of Hilltop, Tyrfran, Llanelly, and was commissioned from the Royal Fusiliers into the Sherwood Foresters on 30 October 1917. Cledwyn was posted to the 2/7th Battalion, which was attached to 178 Brigade, 59th (2nd North Midland) Division. In April 1916 the Division moved to Ireland, and was the first TF Division to serve there, involved in actions against the Republican Uprising of Easter 1916. During January 1917 they returned to England, and the following month landed in France. They followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and then moved north, taking part in the Battle of the Menin Road (part of the Third Battle of Ypres), and the Battle of Polygon Wood. Later that year they moved south, and took part in the Battle of Cambrai. They remained in this sector over the final winter of the war, and on 21 March 1918 were one of the Divisions hit here by the German Spring Offensive, at the Battle of St Quentin. Cledwyn was killed in action here on 21 March 1918, aged 21. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Arras Memorial, France.

Gwilym Cyrus Jones, Private, 316107, Cheshire Regiment. Gwilym was the son of William Isaac and Muriel Jones, of 19, James Street, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the army, and was posted to the 9th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, which was attached to 56 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division had moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos. The Division fought during the opening attack of the Battle of Loos, and then moved to the Somme, where they took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July 1916, capturing the village at heavy cost, and fought through the Somme Battles of Pozieres and the Ancre in 1916. They then moved North to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, and fought on the Menin Road and at Polygon Wood, before moving up to Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. In 1918 they were caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where they suffered terrible casualties, and fought at the Battle of Bapaume. Gwilym was killed in action here on 27 March 1918, aged 19. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Arras Memorial, France.

William John Morgan, 2nd Officer, Mercantile Marine. William was the son of John and Elizabeth Morgan, of Panteg, Felinfoel. He had served for most of the war with the Mercantile Marine on the Atlantic convoys, but had become ill towards the end of the war and was invalided to Tregaron Sanatorium. He died there during the first week of December 1919, aged 24, and is buried in Adulam Chapelyard, Felinfoel. Little else is presently known of William, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Hubert Thomas Morris, Able Seaman, Wales Z/185, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Hubert was born on 22 April 1897, the son of Joseph and Mary Morris, of 3, Greyhound Row, Felinfoel. He was a tinworker prior to enlisting on 25 January 1915 into the Royal Naval Division. He was posted to join Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Division at Gallipoli on 20 August 1915, and two months later was invalided to Britain suffering from dysentery. Hubert was posted to France on 25 July 1916, joining Drake Battalion, which was in the Somme sector, attached to the newly formed 63rd (Royal Naval) Division. The division took part in the Battle of the Ancre, and the resulting Operations on the Ancre. In April 1917 the Division were at Arras, and fought at the Second Battle of the Scarpe, where they captured Gavrelle. Hubert was killed in action at Arras on 23 April 1917, aged 20, and is remembered on the Arras Memorial, France.

Cyrus Price, Private, 31167, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Cyrus was born at Felinfoel in 1894, the son of Thomas and Margaret Price. The family later resided at Nyth y Drew, Dafen. Cyrus was a tinplater prior to the war and enlisted at Swansea on 1 September 1914 into the Royal Garrison Artillery. On 5 June 1915 he was transferred to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and landed in France on 29 September 1915, where he was attached to the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who by this time were attached to 19 Brigade, 33rd Division. Cyrus was wounded at Cuinchy on 25 April 1916, and after a spell in hospital rejoined the battalion in time for the infamous explosion of the Red Dragon mine on 22 June 1916. The battalion lost a large number of men killed during the explosion, and resulting German attack, and the following month moved to the Somme. Cyrus was killed in action during the attack on High Wood, on 20 July 1916, aged 21. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France. Cyrus is not commemorated at Felinfoel, but at Dafen.

Thomas Rees, Private, 200691, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of John and Hannah Rees, of Llanelli. He married Margaret Davies in 1909, and the couple lived at 6, St. David's Street, Llanelli. Thomas enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Thomas was with the 4/5th Welsh when he was taken ill. He died of disease on 21 November 1918, aged 32, and is buried at Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt. His widow, Margaret, married Patrick Mitten of 4, Ynys-Y-Clyn, Felinfoel, after the war, and died in 1952.

 

William Henry Rees, Private, 48712, Northumberland Fusiliers. William was probably the son of David and Elizabeth Rees, of Tyrhitian, Felinfoel. He enlisted at Swansea into the South Wales Borderers, and later transferred into the 2nd Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers, which was attached to 84 Brigade, 28th Division. The Division formed in England from December 1914 from regular units returning from India, Singapore and Egypt. During January 1915 it moved to France, landing at Le Havre and moved to the Western Front, where it saw its first major action during the Second Battle of Ypres. Following serious casualties at Ypres, a Composite Brigade was formed, composing of the 2nd Battalion, the Buffs, 2nd Battalion, the Cheshires, 1st Battalion, the Welsh, and 1st Battalion, the York and Lancaster. It was dissolved on 19 May 1915, and the formation assumed its normal configuration, taking part in the Battle of Loos. During October 1915, the Division embarked at Marseilles, and proceeded to Egypt, and in November moved on to Salonika where the Division then remained. William was taken ill in the Middle East, and was taken to Hospital in Basra, where he sadly died on 11 July 1917, aged 26. He is buried at Basra War Cemetery, Iraq.

 

Daniel John Reynolds, Private, 260488, Gloucestershire Regiment. Daniel was the son of Daniel Reynolds, of 2, Panteg Row, Felinfoel. Prior to the war he resided with his sister, Mrs. Mary H. Edwards, of 67, Marble Hall Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Newport into the Monmouth Regiment, and later transferred into the 12th Battalion, Gloucester Regiment. They formed part of 95 Brigade, 5th Division, which had been in France since 15 August 1914, and had fought in the retreat from Mons to the MArne, before moving to Ypres. Here they had fought at First and Second Ypres, then in 1916 fought at the Somme. During 1917 the Division fought during the Battles of Arras.  On 7 September 1917, they were pulled out of the line again, and moved north to join the great offensive in Flanders- Third Ypres, or Passchendaele as it is better known. On 26 September they fought at the Battle of Polygon Wood, then at Broodseinde, which is where Daniel was killed in action on 4 October 1917, aged 35. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

John Henry Richards, Private, 11833, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of Daniel and Margaret Richards, of 8, Western Row, Felinfoel. He enlisted at Tumble into the 8th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was part of 40 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division. On the 13th June, 1915 the first transports carrying the Division left port, and moved to Alexandria. By the 4th July, all units had moved to Mudros, and landed at Cape Helles over the next few days, relieving the 29th Division. They left and returned to Mudros at the end of the month, and the entire Division landed at ANZAC Cove between 3 and 5 August 1915, taking part in the Battle of Sari Bair. This is where John was killed in action, on 8 August 1915, aged 27. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

Iorwerth Cynon Roberts, Second Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. Iorwerth was the son of Edward and Margaret Roberts, of Felinfoel. He married Mary Elizabeth Jones in 1908, and the couple resided at 1, Birden Terrace, Felinfoel, where they raised two daughters. Iorwerth was commissioned into the Machine Gun Corps, and was posted to their 25th Battalion, attached to 25 Division. The Division landed in France on 26 September 1915, and were posted to the Vimy area, where they defended Vimy Ridge against a German attack in May 1916, then moved to the Warloy area and attacked on the 3rd July near Thiepval. They fought throughout the Battle of the Somme, then moved to Plougsteert, where they held the line, until taking part in the Battle of Messines in June, 1917. They fought at Pilckem, before moving south again, taking up positions around Bullecourt in reserve, and were used to reinforce the badly depleted British units that were hit in the area by the German Spring Offensive. They moved north to Flanders to rest, but they were again hit by a renewed German Offensive, and fought at the Battle of Estaires, where Iorwerth was killed in action on 10 April 1918, aged 33. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.

William Hugh Roberts, Private, 54020, Welsh Regiment. William was born in Felinfoel, the son of William and Mary Roberts. The family lived near Salem Chapel, Felinfoel for many years, but by 1911 had moved to 4, Pontardulais Road, Gorseinon, where William’s father had found work in a steelworks. William himself worked as a coal hewer, before enlisting at Cardiff into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He was posted to France at some time after 1916, joining the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. William was wounded during the division’s gallant defence of Messines during the Battle of the Lys in April 1918, and died of his wounds on 15 April 1918, aged 33. He is buried in Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium. William is not commemorated locally.

Walter Slipp, Private, 206247, Worcestershire Regiment. Walter was the son of Henry Joseph Slipp and Rose Slipp, of 61, Lampard's Buildings, Bath. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Cheshire Regiment, but later transferred into the 1st Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, which was attached to 24 Brigade, 8th Division. The 8th Division was formed during October 1914, by the bringing together of regular army units from various points around the British Empire. The Division moved to the Western Front in November 1914, a badly-needed reinforcement to the BEF which had been all but wiped out at Ypres. They saw their first major action at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, and then at the Battle of Aubers. They then saw further fighting at the Action of Bois Grenier, before moving to the Somme in 1916, where they fought at the Battle of Albert. In March 1917 they followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and later that year moved to Ypres, fighting at the Battle of Pilckem, and the Battle of Langemarck. In March 1918 the Division were on the southern end of the Somme, and here met the German Offensive head on, at the Battle of St Quentin. Walter was killed in action here on 24 August 1918, aged just 21. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Pozieres Memorial, France.

Arthur James Stratton, Private, 25707, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Arthur was the son of John and Rosina Stratton, of 1, Park View, Felinfoel. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 17th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The Battalion was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division, which had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they famously captured Mametz Wood. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Here they fought at Pilckem and Langemarck, then moved to Armentieres, where they remained from September 1917 until March 1918 when the German Spring Offensive was launched. The British had been over-run on the Somme, and so in April the Division was moved South, taking up positions North of Albert, from where they weathered the storm of the coming months. Arthur was killed in action here on 9 May 1918. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Bouzincourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France. Arthur is not commemorated at Felinfoel, but at Tumble.

Henry Taplin, Private, 10504, East Yorkshire Regiment. Henry was born at Bethnel Green. He lived at Felinfoel prior to the war, possibly with Miss Mary Jenkins, and enlisted at Llanelli into the 2nd Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment. The battalion was among those brought back to Britain from around the Empire, and joined 83 Brigade, 28th Division. The division moved to France around 18 February 1915, and moved to positions east of Ypres. Henry was killed in action soon afterwards, on 27 February 1915. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Henry is not commemorated locally.

Walter Ellis Thomas, Private, 40358, Cheshire Regiment. Walter was the son of Henry and Sarah Thomas, of Alma, Felinfoel. He worked as a chemist with his brother at Swansea prior to the war and enlisted there into the Welsh Regiment on 10 December 1915. On 19 September 1917 he transferred into the 15th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, which was part of 105 Brigade, 35th Division. The Division had been in France since January 1916, and had seen much fighting on the Somme that year. After spending several months regaining lost strength, the Division then went back into the line, and followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917. Later in the year they moved north to Ypres, and fought at the Second Battle of Passchendaele. By Spring of 1918 they were back on the Somme, and fought at the First Battle of Bapaume, during the German Offensive. Walter was posted as missing on 28 March 1918, and was later found by a court of enquiry to have been killed on that date, aged 24. He has no known grave, and so he is remembered on the Pozieres Memorial, France. Walter is shown as a Lieutenant on the memorial, but this is the correct man.

William Llewellyn Thomas, Private, 34133, South Lancashire Regiment. William was the son of William Llewellyn Thomas and Martha Thomas, of Wenvoe House, Pentrepoeth, Llanelly. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, but later transferred into the 1/5th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment, which was part of 166 Brigade, 55th (West Lancashire) Division. The Division moved to France during January 1916, and relieved the French 88th Division south of Arras, in the area Wailly- Bretencourt. Trench warfare commenced, with many raids and minor operations, until the Division was relieved by the 11th (Northern) Division on 25 July 1916 and moved to the Somme. Here they fought at the Battle of Guillemont and the Battle of Ginchy. There was a short period of rest at Ribemont  during September, and then the Division fought at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette and the Battle of Morval. On 28 September, the Division withdrew to the area of Buire and Ribemont, before relieving the 29th Division in the Ypres salient in October 1916. It was destined to remain in this area for almost a year, stationed near Railway wood. At the end of July 1917 the Division fought at the Battle of Pilkem, and after suffering terrible casualties, was withdrawn to Recques for re-fit and training, before moving back into the line on 15 September, and fighting at the Battle of the Menin Road. The Division moved out of the line from 22 September and moved to positions near Honnecourt wood and Lempire-Ronssoy, and fought at the Battle of Cambrai. The Division faced the enemy counter attack on 30 November 1917, and were decimated, with the 1/5th Battalion, the South Lancashires being totally annihilated. The Division's reputation fell sharply in the eyes of the higher command, and it was withdrawn from the area and sent to Bomy, near Fruges for intensive training. The Division relieved 42nd (East Lancashire) Division in the front line at Givenchy and Festubert on 15 February 1918, and faced numerous strong enemy raids in March. April was at first much quieter, but it was a lull before the storm, as the Germans launched another offensive here, with the Division taking part in the Battle of Estaires. William was wounded here, and sadly died of wounds on 23 April 1918, aged 41. He is buried at Pernes British Cemetery, France. There is an inscription to his memory on his parents grave at Felinfoel Churchyard. Many thanks to Emma Lister for the photograph of William.

Sydney Williams, Corporal, 13163, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Sydney was the son of David and Jane Williams, of 5, Park View Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was part of 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division crossed to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, form where they fought during the opening attack of the Battle of Loos, on 25 September 1915. Sydney was wounded at Loos, and brought back to the UK for treatment, but sadly died of wounds on 20 October 1915. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Felinfoel (Adulam) Baptist Burial Ground. Many thanks to Sarah Bassett for the photo of his grave.

William David Williams, Corporal. William was probably the son of Hector and Mary Ann Williams, of 12, Stepney Row, Felinfoel. Little else can be found about him, but he looks to have died in 1920, aged 32. Only two men of that name look to have served as Corporals; 240389, Welsh Regiment or S/090925, Royal Army Service Corps.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Reginald John Andrews, Bombardier, 2021926, Royal Artillery. Reginald was the son of Ernest John Andrews and Elizabeth Andrews (nee John), of Llanelli. He married Ethel Davies, of Felinfoel, in 1933. He served with 484 (Carmarthenshire) Searchlight Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was an anti aircraft unit, equipped with the Bofors gun. Reginald died in hospital at Neath on 25 September 1940. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Llanelli (Box) Cemetery. The battery later embarked for overseas to serve in Egypt and Malta. His brother Henry also fell.

Frank Anthony, Gunner, 2050606, Royal Artillery. Frank was the son of Samuel and Emily Anthony, of Llanelly, and the husband of Margaret Elizabeth Anthony, of Felinfoel. He served with 484 Battery, 4 Searchlight Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was stationed at Malta from 1941. Frank was killed at Malta on 21 December 1941, when his searchlight was knocked out during an air raid on the island. He is buried alongside two of his fellow crew-members. Frank was 37 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Military Cemetery, Malta.

William John Clement, Able Seaman, D/JX 168866, Royal Navy. William was the son of Matthew and Gertrude Mary Clement, of Llanelly, and served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Vyner Brooke, which had been requisitioned by the Admiralty for troop carrying. When the Japanese invaded Singapore, Vyner Brooke was ordered from Singapore, carrying Nurses and evacuees. She sailed on the night of 12 February 1942, but on entering The Banka Straits was attacked by nine Japanese planes. Vyner Brooke was hit repeatedly, with the Bridge being totally destroyed, and the steering gear out of order, so the Captain gave orders for the ship to be abandoned. In just over twenty minutes Vyner Brooke sank. William is recorded as having died on 14 February 1942, so was probably killed during the attack on the ship. Most of the survivors landed on a beach near Muntok where they set up a camp and commenced tending the wounded. A couple of days later, on 16 February, the survivors were discovered by a Japanese patrol. Those that could walk were lined up and shot, those who were lying wounded were bayoneted to death, with only one survived the bayoneting. The nurses were then ordered to walk into the sea, and on reaching waist height the Japanese machine gunned them. William was 22 years old, and is now remembered on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

 

Ronald Howell Davies, Corporal, 3963531, Welch Regiment. Ronald was the son of Thomas and Mary Elizabeth Davies, of Felinfoel, and served with the local Territorial unit, the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment. The battalion formed part of the 53rd (Welsh) Division, and spent most of the war training, based in Northern Ireland for a time. In June 1944 the Division landed at Normandy, and took part in the break-out from the beach-head, and the drive through France and Belgium into Holland. Ronald was killed during the Battle of the Bulge on 7 January 1945. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Hotton War Cemetery, Belgium. His brother Wilfred Howell Davies also fell.

Sidney Davies, Stoker, LT/KX 111474, Royal Naval Patrol Service. Sidney was the son of Gwilym and Blodwen Davies, of Llanelly, and the husband of Muriel Davies, of Felinfoel. He served with the Royal Naval Patrol Service aboard HM Trawler Arctic Trapper, which was based at Ramsgate. Sidney was killed when she was machine gunned and sank by German fighters off Ramsgate on 3 February 1941. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Lowestoft Naval Memorial, Suffolk. Sidney is not commemorated on the Felinfoel Memorial.

 

Wilfred Howell Davies, Lance Corporal, 6411190, Welch Regiment. Wilfred was the son of Thomas and Mary Elizabeth Davies, and the husband of Hetty Davies, of Felinfoel. He served with the local Territorial unit, the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment. The battalion formed part of the 53rd (Welsh) Division, and spent most of the war training, based in Northern Ireland for a time. In June 1944 the Division landed at Normandy, and took part in the break-out from the beach-head, and the drive through France and Belgium into Holland. Wilfred was killed in Normandy on 15 August 1944. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Ranville War Cemetery, France. His brother Ronald Howell Davies also fell.

William J. Edwards, Driver, T/3969260, Royal Army Service Corps. William was the son of James and Cathrine J. Edwards, of Felinfoel, and served with the Royal Army Service Corps. He was killed during the battle for Normandy on 18 July 1944. William was 28 years old, and is buried at La Delivrande War Cemetery, Douvres, France.

Thomas Festubert Evans, Gunner, 1827284, Royal Artillery. Thomas was the son of Thomas John and Rebecca Evans, of Felinfoel, and the husband of Silvia Evans, of Llanelly. He served with 48 Battery, 21 Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, based at Singapore. Thomas was taken prisoner when the Singapore Garrison surrendered to the Japanese in December 1941, and was given the POW No. 2521. He was one of thousands of men forced to march to Sandakan Number 2 Camp from the Number 1 Camp around 15 April 1945. Survivors were then moved back to a wired section of Number 2 Camp on 29 May 1945. Thomas died during the march on 14 July 1945. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore. Many thanks to Nigel Anstey for the photograph.

Colin Hawley Harris, Corporal, 319277, Royal Armoured Corps. Colin was the son of Albert and Gladys Harris, of Llanelly, and the husband of Matilda Harris, of Dafen. He served with the 16th/5th Lancers, which was part of the Royal Armoured Corps. The Lancers were attached to the 6th Armoured Division, and fought in North Africa. Colin was killed during the Battle of the Kasserine Pass on 20 February 1943, when the 6th Armoured Division was rushing to the assistance of the beleaguered American II Corps. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

John Moore Harries, Gunner, 1133744, Royal Artillery. John was the son of Jack Elloway Harries and Ethel Elizabeth Harries, of Felinfoel, and served with the 111th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment fought in the Western Desert, John was killed during the Battle of El Alamein on 24 October 1942. He was 20 years old, and is buried at El Alamein War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Henry Haydn Heaven, Gunner, 2036339, Royal Artillery. Henry was the son of Henry and Mary Ann Heaven, and the husband of Margaret Iris Heaven, of Felinfoel. He served with the 41st Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment served during the North African campaign. Henry was killed in North Africa on 24 March 1943. He was 25 years old, and is buried at El Alamein War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

David Vernon Howells, Private, 3909190, Welch Regiment. David was the son of Thomas and Lilian Howells, of Felinfoel, and served with the Welch Regiment. David was killed during the invasion of Italy on 9 August 1944. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Bari War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Phillip Richard Hurley, Gunner, 1722026, Royal Artillery. Phillip was the son of James and Mary Hurley, and the husband of Doris Hurley, of Felinfoel. He served with the 7/4 Maritime Regiment, Royal Artillery, as a DEMS Gunner aboard a merchant ship. Phillip was killed when the ship he was serving aboard, probably the SS Vancouver Island, was torpedoed and sank on 15 October 1941. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon. Phillip is not commemorated on the Felinfoel Memorial.

 

Rhydian Jenkins, Driver, T/276799, Royal Army Service Corps. Rhydian was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Anne Jenkins, of Felinfoel, and served with the Royal Army Service Corps. He was attached to the Royal Artillery, and served during the Malayan campaign. Rhydian died in the Far East on 6 June 1945. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Labuan War Cemetery, Malaysia.

William Samuel John, Private, 3963326, Welch Regiment. William was the son of Luther and Elizabeth John, of Felinfoel, and served with the 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment. The battalion was the local Territorial unit, and was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. William is recorded as having died at sea on 2 July 1940. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey.

 

William Arthur Phillips Jones, Pilot Officer (Pilot), 43100, Royal Air Force. William was educated at Llandovery College. He was gazetted Second Lieutenant into the 4th Welch on 29 October, 1938. He transferred to the Royal Air Force, and served with No 2 School of Army Cooperation, based at Andover. William was pilot of Blenheim IV, T2321 on 20 November 1940 when it stalled on overshoot and crashed three miles west of Thruxton. William was killed in the crash. His body was brought back home and he was buried at Felinfoel (Holy Trinity) Churchyard. William is not commemorated on the Felinfoel Memorial.

 

Frederick George Lawson, Bombardier, 2035896, Royal Artillery. Frederick was the son of William and Lily Beatrice Lawson, and the husband of Sally Connie Lawson, of Llanerch, Llanelly. He served with 484 Battery, 4th Searchlight Battalion, Royal Artillery. Frederick survived the war, but died afterwards, on 5 January 1946. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Felinfoel (Holy Trinity) Churchyard. Frederick is not commemorated on the Felinfoel Memorial.

John Maddocks Lewis, MM, Corporal, 14541663, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). John was the son of John and Mary Lewis, of Felinfoel, and served with the 9th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. John won the Military Medal for bravery in the field during the invasion of Italy. The award was listed in the London Gazette of 8 March 1945. Sadly John had been killed in action on 16 February 1945. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Forli War Cemetery, Italy.

 

Harold Meyler, Gunner, 2092526, Royal Artillery. Harold served with 484 Battery, 4 Searchlight Regiment, Royal Artillery. He was another local man serving with the regiment, and was killed during the defence of Malta on 7 April 1942. Harold was 31 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Military Cemetery, Malta.

 

Hubert Bernel Pile, Second Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Hubert was the son of Charles William and Annie Pile, and the husband of Elizabeth Catherine Pile (Nee Stone), of Llanelly. He served with the Merchant Navy as an Engineer aboard the SS Ashbury, a Glasgow registered merchant ship. Hubert was killed when his ship was lost with all hands when in Convoy off the Isle of Tongue, Scotland on 8 January 1945. He was 45 years old, and is buried at Felinfoel (Holy Trinity) Churchyard. Hubert is not commemorated on the Felinfoel Memorial.

Glyn James Price, Corporal, 7899452, Royal Armoured Corps. Glyn was the son of Margaretta Price, and the stepson of George Jones, of Felinfoel. He served with "C" Squadron, 1st King's Dragoon Guards, which was part of the Royal Armoured Corps. Glyn served with the Kings Dragoons throughout the North African campaign, and was killed in action during the invasion of Italy on 27 August 1944. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Arezzo War Cemetery, Italy.

Cecil James Jones Rees, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1417810, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Cecil was the son of John and Annie Rees, of Medelfyw, Felinfoel. He served with 145 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a fighter squadron, armed with the Supermarine Spitfire IIX, based at RAF Lentini West. Cecil served as ground-crew with the squadron in North Africa. He was accidentally drowned near Tripoli on 8 September 1943, aged 22, and is buried at Tripoli War Cemetery, Libya. Photograph of Cecil courtesy of his nephew, Steve Jones.

 

David Edgar Rees, Gunner, 2038695, Royal Artillery. David was the son of William and Esther Rees, and the husband of Margaret Rees, of Felinfoel. He had served during the war with the Royal Artillery. David died as a result of war wounds on 11 November 1947. He was 45 years old, and is buried at Felinfoel (Adulam) Baptist Burial Ground. David is not commemorated on the Felinfoel Memorial.

 

Ernest Thomas Rees, MID, Sergeant (Cadet Pilot), 524559, Royal Air Force. Ernest was the son of Ernest Graham and Lucie Rees, and the husband of Peggy Rees, of Dafen. Ernest was training as a Pilot in Zimbabwe when he was killed in an air crash on 14 May 1943. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Harare (Pioneer) Cemetery, Zimbabwe. At some time during the war Ernest was Mentioned in Despatches.

 

Herbert David Rees, Radio Officer, Air Transport Auxiliary. Herbert was the son of David and Catherine Ann Rees, of Felinfoel, and served with the Air Transport Auxiliary. The ATA was a civilian organisation that ferried new, repaired and damaged military aircraft between factories, assembly plants, transatlantic delivery points, Maintenance Units (MU), scrap yards, and active service squadrons and airfields. On 10 August 1941, Herbert was one of 22 people aboard a Consolidated Liberator I, Serial AM261, of Ferry Command. The aircraft had taken off in poor weather and was noted by those watching on the ground that the aircraft was climbing at the normal rate as it flew over the outer islands off the mainland. Nothing further was seen or heard of the aircraft until wreckage was discovered a few days later near the summit of a mountain some 25 miles from the take-off point, after having flown into the ground, killing all the occupants. Herbert was 27 years old, and is buried at Kilbride Old Churchyard, Scotland.

 

Thomas Gwynfil Rees, Gunner, 985114, Royal Artillery. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Ann Rees, and the husband of Betty Rees, of Llanelly. He served with the 98th (Surrey & Sussex Yeomanry) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was part of the British Expeditionary Force in France at the outbreak of war. Thomas was caught up in the retreat from Lille to Dunkirk in May 1940. He was wounded, but evacuated safely back to Britain. He died as a result of his wounds on 18 September 1940. Thomas was 25 years old, and is buried at Felinfoel (Holy Trinity) Churchyard. Thomas is not commemorated on the Felinfoel Memorial.

William David Hector Rees, Guardsman, 2735646, Welsh Guards. William was the son of Hector and Edith Rees of Felinfoel, and the husband of Marion Ada Rees, of Great Barr, Birmingham. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Guards, which had been raised in May 1939. The battalion took part in the defence of Boulogne in May 1940, and the survivors were evacuated back to Britain, where they remained until taking part in the Normandy invasion in June 1944, by which time they had converted into an armoured unit. William was killed during the fighting in the Bocage on 3 August 1944. He was 24 years old, and is buried at St. Charles De Percy War Cemetery, France.

David John Richards, Sergeant (Air Gunner), 1418379, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of David and Elizabeth Ann Richards, and the husband of Dorothy Elizabeth Richards, of Llanelly. He served as an Air Gunner with 35 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a bomber unit, equipped with the Handley Page Halifax II, based at RAF Gravely. David was killed when his Halifax was brought down over Holland while returning from a raid on Germany on 13 May 1943. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Haaksbergen General Cemetery, Netherlands.

 

Thomas John Thomas, Corporal, 3962531, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Thomas was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Abel Thomas, and the husband of Eleanor Thomas, of Llanelly. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. The battalion fought in the Western Desert during the war, after moving from Scotland in 1942. Thomas was killed in North Africa on 29 April 1943. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Massicault War Cemetery, Tunisia.

 

Leslie Williams, Gunner, 2036598, Royal Artillery. Leslie was the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Williams of Felinfoel, and the husband of Margaret Williams, of Freckleton, Lancashire. He served with 216 Battery, 70 Heavy Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was based in India. Leslie died in India on 17 May 1943. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Kirkee War Cemetery, India.

DONATIONS. If you find this website of use, please think about donating to help cover the costs of the huge amount of work and the continual costs of keeping the website on-line. Donations can be made using the Paypal link below, or by contacting the author via the Contact page.

Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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