West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llanelli Parish Church (4th Welsh) War Memorial

Llanelli Parish Church is the main church in Llanelli, and is dedicated to St. Elli. The Church is located at Cysgod y Llan, which is off Old Road, and dates from the 12th Century. Situated in the church grounds is a war memorial to the local members of the men of the 4th Welsh who fell during the Great War. The photographs of the memorial were kindly supplied by Caroline Smith. To see more about the history of the 4th Welsh during the Great War, please see this page of the website: 4th Welsh.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Percy Samuel Burroughs Arthur, Private, 200998, Welsh Regiment. Percy was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth Arthur, of 20, Brynallt Terrace, Stebonheath, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and had fought at Gallipoli with the battalion, where it was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. Percy had returned home, and was stationed at Penally Camp, when he drowned whilst swimming under the Esplanade at Tenby on Saturday 18 August 1917. He was 19 years old, and was brought back to Llanelli for burial at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

George Cyril Blake, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. George was the only son of George Frederick and Annie Lambert Blake, of 35, College Hill, Llanelli. He was commissioned into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. George must have taken ill during this time, and was evacuated to England, where he was hospitalised at Manchester. He died there on 5 November 1917, aged 31, and is buried at Manchester Southern Cemetery.

 

Robert Bowser, Lance Corporal, 202636, Welsh Regiment. Robert was the son of Alfred and Hannah Bowser, of Llanelli. He joined the 18th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France during June 1916, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 they moved south to the Somme, and fought at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division were one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year they took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. They remained in the area over the coming months, but were caught here by the German Spring Offensive of 21 March 1918, and suffered heavy casualties in the coming days. Robert was probably wounded here, and sent back to Britain for treatment. He died of his wounds on 29 April 1918, aged 32, and is buried at Llanelli (Old Road) Church Cemetery.

William Callaghan, Acting Corporal, 200766, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of John and Mary Callaghan, of 19, Oxen Street, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. William was wounded at Gaza, and died on 18 July 1917 of his wounds. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Haifa War Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Howell Charles, Private, 4325, Welsh Regiment. Howell, sometimes known as Owen, was the son of Griffith and Hannah Charles, of 11, Caroline Street, Llanelli. He was employed at Llanelli Copper Works before the war, and enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack. Owen was killed here on 10 August 1915. He was just 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

David Daniels, Private, 3867, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of Benjamin and Ann Daniels, of 9, Box Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. David was wounded during the latter stages of the campaign at Gallipoli, and died on 10 December 1915 aboard a Hospital Ship, aged just 19. He was buried at sea, so is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Trevor Daniel, Private, 202975, Welsh Regiment. Trevor was the son of Griffith and Mary Ann Daniel, of Felinfoel, and he enlisted at Llanelli into the 4th Welsh. He was later posted to the 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had landed in France during December 1915 and had spent their first winter in the trenches near Armentieres. In June they marched south to the Somme, where they famously captured Mametz Wood during July 1916. The Division suffered terrible casualties at Mametz, and were taken out of the line, and moved to Ypres to rebuild. Here they fought at Pilckem and Langemarck, then moved to Armentieres, where they remained from September 1917 until March 1918, when the German Spring Offensive was launched. The British had been over-run on the Somme, and so in April the Division was moved South, taking up positions North of Albert, from where they weathered the storm of the coming months, until the war turned during the Battle of Amiens, on 8 August 1918. The Germans had now lost the upper hand, and the British regained the lost ground on the Somme after an attack which began on 21 August 1918, with the 38th Welsh in the midst of the attack during the Battle of Albert, and then moving east, where they fought at the Battle of Bapaume. Trevor was killed in action here on 3 September 1918. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Fins New British Cemetery, Sorel-Le-Grand, France.

Evan John Davies, Private, 4162, Welsh Regiment. Evan was the son of David and Emma Davies, of 12, Caroline Street, Llanelli. He resided at Pontyberem prior to the war, and served with the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Evan was killed here on 16 August 1915, aged 19. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Frederick William Davies, Sergeant, 63129, Welsh Regiment. Frederick was the son of William and Hannah Davies, of 15, Bury Street, Seaside, Llanelli. He worked as a Tinplater prior to enlisting into the 4th Welsh on 26 October 1914. Frederick served at Gallipoli with the 1/4th Welsh, before transferring to the 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment in February 1917. The battalion was in Salonika attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. Frederick was killed during the Battle of Doiran on 18 September 1918. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Doiran Military Cemetery, Greece.

Robert Clifford Davies, Lance Corporal, 267414, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Robert was the son of David and Ann Davies, of 8, Ralph Terrace, Llanelli. He had served with the 4th Welsh from September 1914, with the regimental number 5338, before being transferred to the 2/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Robert was posted as missing in action during the Battle of Fromelles on 19 July 1916. He was later found by a military enquiry to have been killed. Robert was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France. He is possibly one of the men recently discovered in a mass grave at Fromelles.

Thomas Dixon Davies, Sergeant, 3336, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of James and Elizabeth Davies, of Llanelli. He had married in 1901, and lived with his wife Nancy Davies, at Stepney Place, Llanelli. Thomas enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Thomas was wounded at Gallipoli, and evacuated to Hospital at Malta, where he died on 6 October 1915, aged 41. Thomas is buried at Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta.

Edgar Gordon Edwards, Private, 5352, Welsh Regiment. Edgar was the son of William and Martha Edwards, of 101, Albert Town, Haverfordwest. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The 53rd Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 8 August 1915. Here they immediately faced the chaotic leadership that was to lead to the ultimate failure of the campaign, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack. Edgar was killed soon after landing, on 10 August 1915, aged 27, during the Battle of Sari Bair (Attack on Scimitar Hill). He has no known grave, and so is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Edgar Prosser Evans, Private, 85951, Machine Gun Corps. Edgar was the son of David and Mary Evans, of 17, Emma Street, Llanelli. He served with the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, before being posted to the 107th Company, Machine Gun Corps, which was attached to the 36th (Ulster) Division. Edgar probably served with the Division through the Battle of the Somme. They fought at the Battle of Messines the following year, before moving to Ypres, where they took part in the Battle of Langemarck. Edgar was killed here on 2 August 1917. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Haydn Stanley Evans, Private, 203096, Welsh Regiment. Haydn was the son of John and Hannah Evans, of 2, Cawdor Terrace, Cenarth. He had worked with his mother Hannah in their shop at Llanelli prior to 1911, before marrying, and living with his wife Margaret Evans, at 22, Wellfield Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 84 Brigade, 28th Division. The Division formed in England between December 1914 and January 1915 from regular units returning from India, Singapore and Egypt. During January 1915 it moved to France, landing at Le Havre and moved to the Western Front, where it saw its first major action during the Second Battle of Ypres. Following serious casualties at Ypres, a Composite Brigade was formed, composing of the 2nd Battalion, the Buffs, 2nd Battalion, the Cheshire’s, 1st Battalion, the Welsh, and 1st Battalion, the York and Lancaster. It was dissolved on 19 May 1915, and the formation assumed its normal configuration, taking part in the Battle of Loos. During October 1915, the Division embarked at Marseilles, and proceeded to Egypt, and in November moved on to Salonika where the Division then remained. Haydn was accidentally killed in Salonika on 22 May 1918. He was 28 years old, and is buried at Sarigol Military Cemetery, Kriston. He is also remembered on the grave of his mother, at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

Ethelbert Harold Foster, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Ethelbert was the son of Obed and Eliza Jane Foster (nee Williams), of Llantwit Fardre. He was a Science Master at Llanelli for several years prior to the war, and was commissioned into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Ethelbert was then attached to the 1/8th Battalion, London Regiment (Post Office Rifles). He was killed in action during an attack on the Hindenburg Line on 8 October 1918, aged 35, and is buried at Bois-Des-Angles British Cemetery, Crevecoeur-Sur-L’escaut, France.

Thomas Daniel Harries, Private, 201213, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Joseph and Sarah Harries of Mount Pleasant, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Thomas was killed here during the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

William George Harris, Private, 4081, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of Elias Charles Harris and Margaret Harris, of 12, Raby Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. William was killed during the latter stages of the campaign, on 16 November 1915. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Lala Baba Cemetery, Gallipoli.

Charles Edwin Henry, Company Quarter Master Sergeant, 3319, Welsh Regiment. Charles was the son of Gavin and Eliza Henry, of Llanelli. He lived with his wife Sarah Henry (nee Lewis) at 16, Als Street, Llanelli in 1882, and had enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Charles was killed here on 10 August 1915, aged 32. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Charles Morris Howells, Private, 3991, Welsh Regiment. Charles was the son of Edward and Elizabeth Howells, of 4, Williams Terrace, Llanfair, Anglesey. He worked at Tumble prior to the war, and enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion (Carmarthen), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The 53rd (Welsh) Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July, 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here the Division was immediately thrown into action, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Charles was taken ill, and evacuated to Hospital in Egypt, but died there on 1 October 1915. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

David Joseph Hughes, Private, 201404, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of William and Amelia Hughes, of Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. David was killed in Palestine on 12 May 1917, aged 24. He is buried at Gaza War Cemetery, Israel.

Thomas Hughes, Private, 200789, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Harriet Hughes, of Island Place, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Thomas was killed during the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917. He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

David Luther Isaac, Private, 878, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of John and Mary Isaac, of 29, Glenalla Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. David was wounded in the right leg, and was evacuated to Hospital at Malta, where his leg was amputated. Sadly he died in hospital on 22 September 1915, aged 23, and is buried at Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta.

Bertie James, Private, 201027, Welsh Regiment. Bertie was born at Llanelli in 1895, the son of Robert and Elizabeth James of 14 Upper Water Street, Preswylfa row, New Dock, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 4th Welsh and served with the battalion at Gallipoli before being wounded in the arm. After recovering at Grayingham Hospital, Chichester he rejoined the 4th Welsh in Egypt and was wounded at Gaza in March 1917.He returned to the UK again and after recovering was posted to the 18th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was in France attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. Later in the year the division took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. Bertie was killed here on 23 November 1917, aged 22. He is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France. His four brothers also served.

James James, Lance Corporal, 3876, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. James was the Grandson of Robert and Sarah James, of 20, High Street, Llanelli, and in 1910 took up work there as a Porter with the Great Western Railway. He had served with the 4th Welsh, before being transferred into the 2/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which was attached to 182 Brigade, 61st (2nd South Midland) Division. The Division landed in France on 21 May 1916, and moved to the Flanders sector, near Fromelles, where they took over the line held by the 38th Division. Here the Division was to take place in a combined attack with the 4th Australian Division, as a diversion to the main attack on the Somme, but it was a slaughter, with thousands of lives lost needlessly. James was killed just prior to this disastrous attack, on 30 June 1916. He was 20 years old, and is buried at Pont-Du-Hem Military Cemetery, La Gorgue, France.

William Alfred James, Private, 969, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of John and Ann James, of Seaside, Llanelli. He married Margaret Ann Jones in December 1912, and they lived at 11, Railway Place, Seaside, Llanelli. William enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. William was killed towards the end of the Gallipoli campaign, on 10 December 1915. He was 31 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Frederick George Jayne, Sergeant, 4438, Welsh Regiment. Frederick was the son of Frederick William and Sarah Ann Jayne, of Crumlin, Coleshill Terrace, Llanelli. He married Sarah Giles in 1912, and the couple lived at 7, Birdin Terrace, Felinfoel. Frederick enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which had formed locally during August 1914 and were then attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July 1915, and landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli via Mudros on 9 August 1915. Here they immediately faced the chaotic leadership that was to lead to the ultimate failure of the campaign, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack. Frederick was wounded here during the Battle of Sari Bair, and died of wounds aboard a Hospital Ship on 11 August 1915, aged 33. He was buried at sea, and so he is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli. Sarah died in 1934. His brother, Walter Havard Joseph Jayne also fell.

 

Ivor George Jenkins, Private, 4311, Welsh Regiment. Ivor was the son of Edward and Mary Ann Jenkins, of 1, Caroline Street West, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Ivor was wounded later on in the campaign, and died on 26 November 1915. He was 18 years old, and is buried at Lala Baba Cemetery, Gallipoli.

Richard Walter Johnson, Private, 3728, Welsh Regiment. Richard was the son of John and Elizabeth Johnson, of 1, Catherine Street, Llanelli. He married Emily Evans in 1913, and the couple set up home at of 2, Arthur Street, Llanelli, where they had two children. Richard worked at the Pemberton Tinplate Works prior to the war, and enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Richard was wounded within weeks of the landing, and died aboard a hospital ship on 9 September 1915. Richard was buried at sea two days later, so is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

David John Jones, Private, 6673, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. David was the son of William and Elizabeth Jones, of Wemant House, Ammanford Road, Llandebie, and enlisted at Carmarthen into the Welsh Regiment. He subsequently transferred into the 2/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which was attached to 182 Brigade 61st Division. The Division moved to France in May 1916, and fought in Flanders at the disastrous attack on Fromelles. David was Killed in Action here, eleven days before the main attack on 8 July 1916, aged 25. He is buried in Pont-Du-Hem Military Cemetery, La Gorgue, France. The 4th Australian Division, and the 61st Division were to attack here over open fields on 19 July 1916, and were decimated. Most of the remains of the men were buried in a mass grave at V.C. Corner Cemetery, but the remains of over a hundred men killed in the battle have recently been discovered, and re-interred at Pheasant Wood Military Cemetery, Fromelles.

David Samuel Jones, Sergeant, 200436, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of David and Rosetta Jones, of 56, High Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. David was wounded in Palestine, and died on 9 November 1917, aged 26. He is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel. His brother, Walter Thomas Jones, also fell.

David Wynne Jones, Private, 5161, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of David Walter Jones and Jane Jones, of Castle Inn, Hall Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. David was killed here on 10 August 1915. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Green Hill Cemetery, Gallipoli.

Harold Vivian Jones, Private, 54300, Welsh Regiment. Harold was the son of John Lewis Jones and Mary Harriet Jones, of Bridgend Inn, New Dock, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the army, and was posted to France, probably during August 1916, where he joined the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The battalion had recently moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal, where it remained until launching its attack on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917. The 15th Welsh remained in the line, and also took part in the Battle of Langemarck, before the entire Division was moved to positions near Armentieres over the winter. After the Germans launched their offensive on the Somme on 21 March 1918, the Division was moved back to the Somme, and took up positions north of Albert, around Aveluy Wood. From 21 August 1918 the 15th Welsh drove bridgeheads across the River Ancre, and in the following days the Division captured Thiepval Ridge and Pozieres, before driving towards Longueval. Harold was wounded during the drive over the old Somme battlefields. He died on wounds on 1 September 1918, aged 20, and is buried at Varennes Military Cemetery, France.

James Dawson Jones, Private, 4406, Welsh Regiment. James was born at Mold, and lived at Preswylfa Row, New Dock, Llanelli prior to the war. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. James was killed here on 16 August 1915, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Thomas John Jones, Lance Corporal, 4232, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at Llanelli, and enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. After being evacuated from Gallipoli, the Division spent twelve months in Egypt taking part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur. Thomas died in Egypt on 26 April 1916. He is buried at Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Walter Thomas Jones, Private, 201556, Welsh Regiment. Walter was the son of David and Rosetta Jones, of 56, High Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Welsh Regiment, and was posted to Salonika, to join the 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. Walter was killed in Salonika on 3 August 1917, aged just 19. He is buried at Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece. His brother, David Samuel Jones, also fell.

Robert James Kemp, Private, 423306, London Regiment. Robert was the Husband of Catherine Jane Kemp (nee Lewis), of 3, Brickyard Cottages, New Dock, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 4th Welsh, but was later posted to the 2/10th Battalion, London Regiment, which was known as the Hackney battalion, and was attached to 175 Brigade, 58th (2/1st London) Division. On 4 February 1917 the battalion landed at Le Havre, and followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line in March. They then took part in the Flanking Operations Round Bullecourt. Later that year they moved north to Ypres, and took part in the Battle of the Menin Road, the Battle of Polygon Wood and the Second Battle of Passchendaele. In March 1918 the Division was positioned around St. Quentin, and was caught up in heavy fighting during the German Spring Offensive of 21 March. In August 1918 the Allies pressed an attack towards Villers Brettoneux, as part of the Battle of Amiens, and later in the month the Division also took part in the Battle of Albert which helped turn the war. Robert was wounded here, and died on 13 August 1918. He was 33 years old, and is buried at Pernois British Cemetery, Halloy-Les-Pernois, France.

John Joseph Lissamore, Private, 4434, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of John Joseph and Jane Lissamore, of Llanelli. He married Charlotte Ann Jones in 1909, and the couple lived at 13, Amos Terrace, Llanelli, where Charlotte gave birth to their son John in 1912. John enlisted at Llanelli at the outbreak of war, and joined the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Sadly, John drowned while 180 men of the 4th Welsh were on swimming parade at Neyland on 30 August 1914. John was 23 years old. His body was never found, so John is commemorated on the Hollybrook Memorial, Southampton.

Thomas Lloyd, Private, 63126, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Rachel Lloyd, of 58, High Street, Abergwili. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 4th Welsh before being transferred into the 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, part of 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. The Division spent just a month in France, before embarking at Marseilles on 30 October, 1915 bound for Salonika, arriving on 8 November. They remained at Salonika throughout the war, where Thomas was wounded in action during the Battle of Doiran. He Died of Wounds on 21 September 1918, aged just 21, and is buried at Sarigol Military Cemetery, Kriston.

Thomas George Mack, Acting Sergeant, 3242, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Mary Jane Mack, of 45, Stepney Place, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Thomas was killed here on 11 August 1915. He was 35 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

David Henry Martin, Private, 5088, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of William and Mary Ellen Martin, of 14, Ashburton, Cork. He worked at Llanelli prior to the war, and married Fanny Walters in 1910. The couple then lived at 3, New Dock Road, Llanelli, where their son David Victor Martin was born. David enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. David was wounded later in the campaign at Gallipoli, and died on 31 October 1915. He was 36 years old, and is buried at Lala Baba War Cemetery, Gallipoli.

David James Mason, Private, 201348, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of James Edwin Mason and Ann Mason, of 16, Cambrian Place, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion (Carmarthen), Welsh Regiment, part of 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Gallipoli on 9 August 1915 and suffered terrible casualties over the coming months there. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, and in early 1917 moved into Palestine, where they remained for the duration of the war, fighting at the Battles of Gaza, and successfully capturing Jerusalem. David was killed during the capture of Jerusalem, on 3 November 1917, aged 24. He is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel. His brother Albert Mason also died.

William Henry Mathias, Private, 5016, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of William and Ellen Mathias, of Llanelli. He married Agnes May Daniels at Capel Als on 25 January 1914. William served throughout the war with the 4th Welsh and appears to have survived the conflict, re-enlisting in 1921. He died at Llanelli in 1959, aged 79, so why he is named on the memorial is presently a mystery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sydney Boaz May, Private, 200996, Welsh Regiment. Sydney was born at Weymouth, the son of Joseph and Lillie May. The family had moved to the GWR Dock at Llanelli prior to 1911, where Joseph became the Harbour Master. Sydney enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Sydney was wounded during the First Battle of Gaza, and died on 27 March 1917, aged 21. He is buried at Deir El Belah War Cemetery, Egypt.

Thomas Owen, Private, 201699, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born in St. Dogmaels. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 4th Battalion of the Welsh Regiment, which was a Territorial Battalion, forming part of the South Wales Brigade. On 17 April 1915 the Battalion was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, and was sent to Gallipoli, arriving there on 9 August 1915. They gave a good account of themselves on Gallipoli, but when the blizzard of November 1915 hit the Peninsula, the Battalion suffered terrible casualties, necessitating their having to merge temporarily with the 1/5th Welsh, forming the 4/5th Composite Battalion. The Division were evacuated soon after, arriving in Egypt on 23 December that year. For the next eight months the Division guarded the Suez Canal, before moving to Palestine, fighting in the Sinai Desert, and taking part in the First Battle of Gaza in 1917. Thomas was killed in Action during the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

Henry William Palmer, Corporal, 201132, Welsh Regiment. Harry born at Walsall in 1898, the son of George and Mary Palmer. By 1901 the family had moved to Mona, Pembrey Road, Llanelli. Henry enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Henry was wounded while fighting in the Jordan Valley. He died of his wounds on 10 March 1918, aged 19, and is buried at Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel.

William Frank Pearce, Private, 201291, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of James and Mary Ann Pearce, of 19, Great Western Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt, joining the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur. During March 1917 the EEF advanced into Palestine. William was captured by the Turks during the First Battle of Gaza, and died as a POW in a military hospital at Baghdad on 4 March 1918, aged 25. He is buried at Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Iraq.

 

William Charles Phillips, Private, 4163, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of Charles and Hannah Phillips, of 25, Derwent Street, Llanelli. He worked as a behinder at the Old Lodge Tinplate Works prior to enlisting at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. William was killed here on 10 August 1915. He was 21 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

William Henry Poyntz, Private, 3649, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of Police Sergeant William Henry Poyntz, and the Husband of Sarah Poyntz, of 10, Cornish Place, Llanelli. He worked for the GWR prior to enlisting at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. William was wounded at Gallipoli, and died at sea on 31 August 1915, aged 22. He was buried at sea, so is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Sydney Stevenson Preston, Private, 3889, Welsh Regiment. Sydney was the son of Ernest John Preston and Ellen Preston, of Downing Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Sydney was wounded at Gallipoli, and evacuated to the Hospital at Malta, where he died on 12 October 1915. He was 18 years old, and is buried at Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta. His father had served as a Sergeant with the 2/4th Welsh.

D. Price. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

George William Randle, Sergeant, 201047, Welsh Regiment. George was the son of Richard and Jane Randle, of 2, Lodge Road, Stourport, Worcs. He lived at Llanelli with his wife, Florence Annie Randle, prior to the war, and enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. George was killed during the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917, aged 33, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

Richard Wells Rees, Private, 200879, Welsh Regiment. Richard was the son of William George and Sarah Rees, of New Houses, Upper William Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Richard was transferred into the 1/5th Battalion, Welsh Regiment in Palestine, and took ill and died in hospital at Cairo on 12 June 1918. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

 

Thomas Rees, Private, 200691, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of John and Hannah Rees, of Llanelli. He married Margaret Davies in 1909, and the couple lived at 6, St. David's Street, Llanelli. Thomas enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Thomas was with the 4/5th Welsh when he was taken ill. He died of disease on 21 November 1918, aged 32, and is buried at Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt. His widow, Margaret, married Patrick Mitten of 4, Ynys-Y-Clyn, Felinfoel, after the war, and died in 1952.

Willie Rees, Private, 810, Welsh Regiment. Willie was the son of William and Esther Rees, and the Husband of Margaret Rees, of 19, Dolau Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Willie returned home after the evacuation of Gallipoli, and died in a military hospital in Kent on 18 July 1916. He was 33 years old, and is buried at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

William Henry Sebastian Rees, Company Sergeant Major, 200742, Welsh Regiment. William was born at Devonport on 1 August 1894, the son of Major W. H. Rees and Mrs. E. A. Rees, of Palmer Avenue, Llanelli, and of 35C, The Promenade, Palmers Green, London. William enlisted into the Territorials in 1914, and at the outbreak of war joined the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. William was 22 years old when he was killed during the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917, and is buried at Gaza War Cemetery, Israel.

John Richards, Private, 54388, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of Edward and Mary Ann Richards, of 69, Ropewalk Road, New Dock, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the army, and was posted to France early in 1917, joining the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. John joined the battalion at Boesinghe, north of Ypres. He fought in the Battle of Pilckem on 31 July 1917, where the Division successfully captured Pilckem Ridge. The 15th and 16th Welsh remained in the line over the coming weeks, and on 27 August 1917, the 16th Welsh made a badly planned assault on Eagle Trench, near Langemarck. John was killed that day. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Victor George Roberts, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Victor was the son of Joseph and Annie Roberts, of ‘Y Goedwig’, Lakefield Road, Llanelli. He joined the Inns of Court OTC on 2 January 1916 and was commissioned Second Lieutenant into the 4th Welsh on 28 February 1917. Victor was posted to the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the Carmarthen Pals battalion, which was in France, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. He was killed at Ypres soon after, on 27 July 1917, when the Germans fired an artillery barrage on the trenches held by the 15th Welsh. Victor was 20 years old, and is buried alongside many of his comrades at Bard Cottage Cemetery, Boesinghe, Belgium.

Alan Whitlock Nicholl Roderick, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Alan was the third son of William and Ella Augusta Buckley Roderick, of Goodig, Pembrey. He served as a Lieutenant with the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which had formed at Carmarthen in August, 1914. They were later attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division, and sailed from Devonport in July 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August, 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August 1915. Here they immediately faced the chaotic leadership that was to lead to the ultimate failure of the campaign, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack. Alan was killed in action here on 10 August 1915, and is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli. His brothers Hume and John Roderick also fell.

Hume Buckley Roderick, Captain, Welsh Guards. Hume was the eldest son of William and Ella Buckley Roderick, of Goodig, Pembrey. Born in 1887, he was educated at Parkfield School, Hayward's Heath, and at Rugby, where he was a member of the Cricket XI. He later qualified as a Solicitor, and was a member of the firm of Roderick and Richards, Llanelli. At the outbreak of war, Hume was a Captain with the 4th Welsh, stationed at Pembroke Dock. He went with the Welsh to Gallipoli, attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division, but was invalided home due to illness. Hume then returned to Egypt to rejoin his Battalion in 1916, and later that year returned home again, to take up a Commission in the Welsh Guards. Meanwhile, whilst back in the UK, he married Barbara Garnons-Williams, daughter of the late Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Garnons-Williams, who had been killed at Loos the previous year. The couple set up home at Tegfan, Devynock, Breconshire. Hume joined his new Battalion on the Western Front in December 1916 and took command of No. 3 Company, 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards. In July 1917 Hume was wounded at Ypres, but remained at the front, and moved with the Battalion from Ypres to positions near Cambrai, where they fought at the Battle of Cambrai throughout November and December 1917. Hume was killed in action at Cambrai on 1 December 1917, whilst leading his Platoon on a charge against a German Machine Gun Post. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Gouzeaucourt New British Cemetery, France. His brothers Alan and John Roderick also fell.

William Malcolm Rowlands, Sergeant, 3161, Welsh Regiment. William was son of Edward Isaac and Elizabeth Rowland, of 14, Sunninghill Terrace, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. William was killed here while advancing along a gulley on 10 August 1915, aged 28. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

 

Arthur Samuel, Private, 75208, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Arthur was the son of David and Mary Ann Samuel, of 9, Spring Gardens, Llanelli. He enlisted there into the 4th Welsh, and was posted to France early in 1918, where he joined the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion had joined 115 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division in February 1918, before moving to positions north of Albert on the Somme. On 21 August 1918 the Division began to cross the River Ancre, capturing Thiepval Ridge and Pozières before pushing towards Longueval and Sailly-Saillisel. Arthur was killed during the advance, on 1 September 1918, aged 19. He is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France. His brother Sydney also fell.

Walter Slipp, Private, 206247, Worcestershire Regiment. Walter was the son of Henry Joseph Slipp and Rose Slipp, of 61, Lampard's Buildings, Bath. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 4th Welsh, before transferring to the Cheshire Regiment, and later transferred into the 1st Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, which was attached to 24 Brigade, 8th Division. The 8th Division was formed during October 1914, by the bringing together of regular army units from various points around the British Empire. The Division moved to the Western Front in November 1914, a badly-needed reinforcement to the BEF which had been all but wiped out at Ypres. They saw their first major action at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, and then at the Battle of Aubers. They then saw further fighting at the Action of Bois Grenier, before moving to the Somme in 1916, where they fought at the Battle of Albert. In March 1917 they followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and later that year moved to Ypres, fighting at the Battle of Pilckem, and the Battle of Langemarck. In March 1918 the Division were on the southern end of the Somme, and here met the German Offensive head on, at the Battle of St Quentin. Walter was killed in action here on 24 August 1918, aged just 21. He has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Pozières Memorial, France.

Noel Gordon Stallard, Lance Corporal, 3886, Welsh Regiment. Noel was the son of Alfred and Eliza Sarah Stallard, of 12, Westbury Street, New Dock, Llanelli. He enlisted with his brother Harry at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Noel was killed here on 10 August 1915, and Harry was wounded the same day. Noel was 18 years old, and is buried at Green Hill Cemetery, Gallipoli.

Thomas Granville Stephens, Private, 4271, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of John and Elizabeth Anne Stephens, of Brynmor, Llwynhendy. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. Thomas was killed in action here during the Battle of Sari Bair, on 11 August 1915. He was just 21 years old, and is remembered on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

William John Stroud, Private, 4164, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of Thomas and Mary Jane Stroud, of 5, Corporation Avenue, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion (Carmarthen), Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The 53rd (Welsh) Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July, 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here the Division was immediately thrown into action, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. William was killed here on 19 August 1915, aged 20. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

Cornelius Sullivan, Private, 63127, Welsh Regiment. Cornelius was the son of Cornelius and Mary Sullivan, of 9, Swansea Road, Llanelli. His papers show that he had originally enlisted in August 1914 into the 3rd Welsh, but had deserted, before enlisting at Llanelli on 23 October 1914, into the 4th Welsh. He had served at Gallipoli, and in Egypt with the 1/4th Welsh, before being posted to the 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was in Salonika attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. Cornelius survived the war, but died on 5 April 1919. He is buried at Old Road Church Cemetery, Llanelli.

 

James Thomas, Sergeant, 201101, Welsh Regiment. James was born at Llanelli, and enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. James was then attached to the 2/2nd King’s African Rifles, which fought in the East African campaign. James was killed here on 31 August 1918, aged 44. He is buried at Lumbo British Cemetery, East Africa.

 

John Calandydd Thomas, Private, 201358, Welsh Regiment. John resided at cross Hands, and served with the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July, 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here they immediately faced the chaotic leadership that was to lead to the ultimate failure of the campaign, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, and in early 1917 moved into Palestine, where they remained for the duration of the war, fighting at the Battles of Gaza, and successfully capturing Jerusalem. John was wounded during the Battle of Jerusalem, and died there just days later, on 13 December 1917. He is buried at Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel.

Lewis Thomas, Corporal, 201202, Welsh Regiment. Lewis was born at Treorchy, but lived at Llanelli prior to the war. He enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Lewis was killed during the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917, aged 32. He is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

Rupert Washer, Acting Corporal, 201158, Welsh Regiment. Rupert was born at St Clears in 1884, the son of Henry Washer and Anna Washer (nee John) The family moved to 9, Biddulph Street, New Dock, Llanelli by 1891, and Rupert married Mary Hannah Rogers in 1910. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Rupert was killed during the First Battle of Gaza, on 26 March 1917, aged 32, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

David George Williams, Private, 267421, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. David was the son of John and Louisa Williams, of 32, College Hill, Llanelli. He originally enlisted into the 4th Welsh, before being transferred into the 2/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which was attached to 182 Brigade, 61st (2nd South Midland) Division. The Division moved to France during 21 May 1916, moving to positions at Fromelles. The first major action in which the Division was engaged turned out to be a disaster, with heavy casualties suffered, for no real gains. David survived Fromelles, and served in France for a year before returning home ill. He died in hospital at Salisbury on 7 June 1916, aged 26, and is buried at Box Cemetery, Llanelli.

John Charles Williams, Private, 201121, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of George and Elizabeth Williams, of 27, Stepney Place, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 4th Welsh, and was posted to France in 1917 as a reinforcement for the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, the Carmarthen Pals battalion, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. John would have joined the Division at Ypres, and possibly fought at Pilckem Ridge. After wintering in the Armentieres sector, the Division moved to the Somme in April 1918, and remained here until the 15th Welsh crossed the River Ancre on 21 August 1918, creating bridgeheads for the remainder of the Division to cross, when they began their great advance towards the Hindenburg Line. John was killed during the Second Battle of Bapaume, on 4 September 1918. He was 35 years old, and is buried at Morval British Cemetery, France.

Peter Williams, Private, 201130, Welsh Regiment. Peter was the son of William and Annie Williams, of Wem, Shropshire. He had moved to Gwaun-cae-Gurwen by 1911, and was working at Llanelli when he enlisted there into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion was the Carmarthenshire Territorial battalion, attached to 158 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to the Mediterranean in July 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August, and were plunged into heavy fighting soon after. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, and in early 1917 moved into Palestine, where it took part in the First Battle of Gaza. Peter was killed here on 26 March 1917, aged 29, and is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel.

Walter Williams, Private, 4435, Welsh Regiment. Walter was the son of George Williams, of 9, Park Crescent, Llanelli, and the Husband of Mary Williams, of 17, Gellideg, Capel, Llanelli. He enlisted into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Walter was killed here on 10 August 1915. He was 33 years old, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

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Website News

4 November 2017. Some good news this week following the discovery, after much searching, of the grave of Private Thomas Davies, of Laugharne. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers page of the website for details.

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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