West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llanelli (Post Office) Memorial

The Memorial to the Postal Workers from Llanelli and District who fell during both World Wars is located at the old Post Office at St. John's Street, Llanelli. This page commemorates the men on the memorial, the majority of which have been positively identified. The photograph of the memorial was kindly sent in by Lisa Voyle, but she couldn't get close enough to it to get a photo of the complete memorial, and it seems possible that two more WW2 names are missing. If someone tall enough would be able to get a complete photo of the memorial, it would be appreciated!<< New text box >>

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Albert Owen Davies, Signaller, Z/1094, Royal Navy. Albert was born on 22 August 1882, the son of William and Jane Davies, of 3, New Street, Burry Port. He joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1904. Albert served in the Royal Navy aboard the M-Class destroyer H.M.S. Paladin. Albert died of sickness on 2 December 1917, aged 29, and is buried at Burry Port (Tabernacle) Baptist Chapelyard.

Ivor Samuel Griffiths, Private, 20499, Welsh Regiment. Ivor was the son of William and Mary Ann Griffiths, of 10, Glanyrafon Row, Felinfoel. He had joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1911, and at the outbreak of war enlisted at Llanelli into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion. The battalion was trained at Rhyl, before landing in France in December 1915 attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. The Division had familiarised into trench warfare around Fleurbaix, and Givenchy. In June 1916 they marched south to the Somme, where they were tasked with the capture of Mametz Wood. The attack on the wood began on 7 July 1916, but met with fierce resistance, so the Welshmen were withdrawn, and after a change in Commanding Officer, a fresh attack was launched on 10 July 1916. Ivor was killed in action during heavy hand to hand fighting within Mametz Wood, on 11 July 1916. He was just 19 years old, and is buried at Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz, France.

William John Jones, Corporal, 371436, London Regiment. William was the son of William and Hannah Jones, of 13, Andrew Street, Llanelli. He joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1910, enlisted at Llanelli into the army at the outbreak of war. William was posted to France with the 8th Battalion, London Regiment, which was known as the Post Office Rifles. On 18 March 1915 the battalion landed at Le Havre, and two months later its formation was renamed 140 Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. The Division fought at the Battle of Aubers, and the Battle of Festubert during May 1915 and in September fought at the Battle of Loos, and subsequent Action of Hohenzollern Redoubt. They were north of Arras when the Germans attacked Vimy Ridge on 21 May 1916, and William was killed that day. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Sydney Stevenson Preston, Private, 3889, Welsh Regiment. Sydney was the son of Ernest John Preston and Ellen Preston, of Downing Street, Llanelli. He joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1913, and at the outbreak of war enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Sydney was wounded at Gallipoli, and evacuated to the Hospital at Malta, where he died on 12 October 1915. He was 18 years old, and is buried at Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta. His father had served as a Sergeant with the 2/4th Welsh.

David Charles Pritchard, Private, 8443, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of David and Mary Ann Pritchard, of Cardiff. He was an army reservist, and was working at Llanelli Post Office by 1912. David rejoined the army at Merthyr at the outbreak of war and was posted to the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion moved to France at the outbreak of war, attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division, and took part in almost every major engagement thereafter. David was taken prisoner by the Germans at some time during the war, and was taken to a POW Camp in Germany. He became ill, and died in captivity on 9 April 1918, aged 31, and is buried at Berlin South-Western Cemetery, Germany.

Alfred Thomas Reece, Corporal, 222280, Labour Corps. Alfred was the son of Thomas and Sarah Reece, of Ivy Cottage, Stapleton, Salop. He joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1913, after leaving the army, and at the outbreak of war re-enlisted at Shrewsbury into the 1st Battalion, King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Alfred was wounded at some time and returned home for a spell to recuperate. He married Annie May Overton, of 2, Park Terrace, Dorrington, Salop in the summer of 1917 before returning to France attached to the 209th Employment Company, Labour Corps. Alfred was wounded during the Battle of Cambrai, and died at Manancourt on 8 December 1917, aged 31. He is buried at Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt, France. Annie remarried, and died in 1933.

John Rees, Gunner, 95284, Royal Field Artillery. John was the son of Hector and Margaret Rees of 35, Crooked Row, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the Royal Field Artillery, and was posted to France with B Battery, 71st Brigade, which was attached to the 15th (Scottish) Division. John was killed during the Second Battle of the Scarpe, on 24 April 1917. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Feuchy Chapel British Cemetery, Wancourt, France.

William John Richards, Rifleman, 485024, London Regiment. William was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Richards, of 53, Stepney Place, Llanelli. He joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1911, and on 8 December 1915 enlisted at Llanelli into the 8th Battalion, London Regiment, which was known as the Post Office Rifles. William was posted to France on 18 March 1917, where he joined the 12th Battalion (The Rangers), London Regiment, which was attached to 168 Brigade, 56th (London) Division. He joined the battalion on the Somme, in time to take part in the advance to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917 and the ensuing Battle of Arras. William was wounded here during the Third Battle of the Scarpe on 12 May, after being shot in the head, and was evacuated to the Base Hospital at Etaples for treatment. He died on 27 May 1917, aged 24, and is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, France.

Adolphus Thomas, Private, 2591, Welsh Guards. Adolphus was the son of Lewis and Mary Thomas, of White Lion Hotel, Llandeilo. He was the local postman at Llandeilo prior to joining the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1909. Adolphus enlisted at Ammanford into the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards on 9 December 1915. The Welsh Guards were raised after the Royal Warrant of 26 February 1915. After being formed, they became part of the 3rd Guards Brigade, Guards Division, which was formed in France in August, 1915. Their first taste of battle was at Loos, and they then moved to Ypres to rebuild their strength after the fierce fighting there. The Guards remained here until July 1916, when the Division moved to the Somme, and fought at the Battles of Flers-Courcelette and Morval. The Guards followed the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917. They then moved to Ypres, prior to taking part in the Battle of Third Ypres. Adolphus was wounded by multiple shrapnel wounds while the Welsh Guards were in the line at Ypres. He died of wounds that same day, on 15 July 1917, aged 26. Adolphus is buried at Canada Farm Cemetery, Belgium. His brother was also serving with the colours in Salonika.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Ronald Porter Lloyd, Corporal, 1897209, Royal Engineers. Ronald was the son of George Robert Nelson Lloyd and Elizabeth Lloyd, of 8, White Street, Swansea. Ronald joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1939, and joined the Royal Engineers at the outbreak of war. Ronald was posted to the 8th Armoured Brigade Headquarters during the Battle of Normandy, and died while serving as part of the army of occupation in Germany on 5 October 1945, aged 35. Ronald is buried at Celle War Cemetery, Germany.

 

Edmund Toulmin Rees, Sergeant, 1653111, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Edmund was the son of Ernest Morgan Rees and Sarah Jane Rees (nee Toulmin), of Bynea. His father had served with the Welsh Regiment during the Great War, but Edmund decided on joining the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, and was posted to North Africa with 78 Operational Training Unit. He was killed in Libya on 3 November 1944, aged 21, possibly during the crash of a Douglas Baltimore V. Edmund is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Libya. (The Memorial shows E.T. Rees, and either of these two men could be the correct person).

 

Ernest Thomas Rees, MID, Sergeant (Cadet Pilot), 524559, Royal Air Force. Ernest was the son of Ernest Graham and Lucie Rees, and the husband of Peggy Rees, of Dafen. Ernest was training as a Pilot in Zimbabwe when he was killed in an air crash on 14 May 1943. He was 27 years old, and is buried at Harare (Pioneer) Cemetery, Zimbabwe. On 17 March 1941 war Ernest was Mentioned in Despatches. (The Memorial shows E.T. Rees, and either of these two men could be the correct person).

 

John Edgar West, Sergeant, 1254233, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John was the son of James William West and Una Mabel West (nee Slater), of Llanelli. He joined the staff of Llanelli Post Office in 1937, and at the outbreak of war enlisted into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. After training as a Navigator, John was posted to 97 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was a heavy bomber unit, equipped with the Avro Lancaster I, based at R.A.F. Woodhall Spa. John was a veteran of at least nine missions as part of the crew of Lancaster R5575, Serial OF-L. On the night of 17 January 1943, the Lancaster took off from Woodhall Spa bound for Germany. The aircraft failed to return the following morning, and was posted at missing on 18 January 1943. No trace of the aircraft was ever found, and it was presumed to have crashed into a canal in Holland, where one of the bodies of the crew was found. John, like the remainder of his crew, was posted as missing presumed killed on that day. He was 22 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

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Website News

4 November 2017. Some good news this week following the discovery, after much searching, of the grave of Private Thomas Davies, of Laugharne. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers page of the website for details.

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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