West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Borth War Memorial

Borth is situated seven miles north of Aberystwyth, on the estuary of the River Dyfi, overlooking Cardigan Bay. The village was once a thriving fishing port, but is now better known as a popular holiday destination. Several of its caravan parks are overlooked by the Borth War Memorial, which sits on the cliff-top overlooking the town and Cardigan Bay. The men named on the Borth Memorial are also commemorated on several memorials which are located inside the Church. The photographs of the Borth men are from the Cambrian News archives and the National Archives.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Thomas Arter, First Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Thomas was born in 1880, the son of John and Ann Arter, of Bay View, Borth. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Harbury. Harbury was a defensively-armed merchant steamer. On Saturday 9 June 1917, she was 170 miles from Ushant, when she was torpedoed without warning and sunk by a German submarine. Thomas was among 12 men lost in the sinking that day. He was 36 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Basil Lougher Davies, Sailor, Mercantile Marine. Basil was born in 1897, the son of Thomas and Mary Anne Davies, of Gloucester House, Borth. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Penvearn. On 1 March 1918, she was 15 miles from South Stack, Anglesey, when she was torpedoed and sank by the German submarine UB-48. Basil was among the men lost in the sinking that day. He was 20 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

 

David Davies. David was the nephew of James Davies, of Wesleyan Place, Borth. On 23 November 1917 he set out from Borth Bay aboard a small boat with his uncle, James Davies and 13 year old Henry Jones, aiming to carry out some fishing, and also to salvage some floating debris, possibly cork, which they had seen floating in the bay. Nothing more was heard of them, so the lifeboat was launched at 05.00 pm, but no trace of the three was found. Their boat drifted ashore at Aberdovey bar later that day. David was 21 years old, and because he is not a war casualty, is not commemorated by the CWGC. His father was Richard Davies, who lost his life at sea on 25 March 1917. (See Below).

 

James Davies. James lived at Wesleyan Place, Borth, and had been discharged from the Royal Navy after losing an eye early in the war. On 23 November 1917 he set out from Borth Bay aboard a small boat with his nephew, Richard Davies and 13 year old Henry Jones, aiming to carry out some fishing, and also to salvage some floating debris, possibly cork, which they had seen floating in the bay. Nothing more was heard of them, so the lifeboat was launched at 05.00 pm, but no trace of the three was found. Their boat drifted ashore at Aberdovey bar later that day. James was 50 years old, and because he is not a war casualty, is not commemorated by the CWGC.

Richard Davies, Deck Hand, DA/9/88, Royal Naval Reserve. Richard was born at Borth on 29 December 1863, and married in 1878, residing with his wife, Mary Davies, and their children at 5, Wesleyan Place, Borth. Richard worked as a labourer prior to the war, but was also a Royal Naval Reservist. He was recalled to the colours at the outbreak of war, and was posted to HM Trawler Evangel. She was used for anti-submarine duties in the Irish Sea, sailing from her base at Milford Haven. On 25 March 1917, Evangel was on patrol off Milford when she struck a mine which had been laid by the German submarine UC-48, and sank with the loss of 25 lives. Richard was among the men killed that day, and was 54 years old. His body was recovered from the sea, and he was buried at Penygarn Calvinistic Methodist Cemetery, Tirymynach.

 

Thomas Lewis Davies, Private, 26752, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was born at Borth in 1895, the son of Thomas and Mary Davies, of Nathaniel House, Borth. He originally enlisted into the Royal Flying Corps, but at sometime after 1915 transferred into the 7th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. Thomas joined the battalion at Salonika sometime in 1916. Between 10 to 18 August 1916 they fought at the battle of Horseshoe Hill, then between 13 to 14 September 1916 at the battle of Machukovo. Between 24-25 April and 8-9 May 1917 the Division fought at the battle of Doiran, and then on 18 September 1918 at the Second Battle of Doiran. Thomas was killed in action here, at the Second Battle of Doiran, on 18 September 1918. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Doiran Military Cemetery, Salonika.

 

Thomas Hughes Dutton, Captain, Mercantile Marine. Thomas was born at Borth in 1865, the eldest son of George and Eliza Dutton, Chester House, Borth. He married Winifred Jones in 1907, and the couple resided at Rock Ferry, Cheshire. Thomas was Master of the SS Patania, and Winifred travelled with him. He died of malaria at Sapele, West Africa, while captain of the Patania on 14 February 1915. Nothing more is known of Thomas, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

Oswald Henry Feilden, Captain, Leicestershire Regiment. Oswald was born at Borth in 1887 the son of Lt.-Col. Robert and Emily Jane Feilden, of 1, Cambrian Terrace. His parents later resided at Lane End, Hartney, Spilsby, Lincs. Oswald had been educated at Llandovery College from 1898 to 1900, before taking his degree at Aberystwyth. Oswald joined the Leicestershire Territorial's in 1911, and was commissioned into the 5th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment on 15 January 1912. The Division had served in Ireland and had been involved in the Easter uprising, before being sent to the Western Front, where they landed in France on 24 February 1917, attached to 177 Brigade, 59th Division. They fought during the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and then moved to Ypres. After training around the Vormezeele area in Flanders in early September 1917, Oswald's Battalion moved to St. Jean near Ypres, to prepare for a major attack which was timed to take place on 26 September. At 05.50 hours on 26 September 1917, the 2/5th Leicester's, attacked hill 37, taking all its objectives. Oswald was severely wounded in this action and died from his wounds at 46 Casualty Clearing Station, Proven on 29 September 1917, aged 30. Oswald is buried there, at Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium. He is also commemorated on a memorial at St. Matthews Church, Borth.

Arthur Footitt, Sergeant, 29691, Yorkshire Regiment. Arthur was born at Matlock, Derbyshire in 1884, the son of Harry and Harriet Footitt. He went to work as a coachman in Aberllowyn mansion in Llanfarian around the turn of the century, and married Rebecca Lewis, the mansion’s cook, in Tabernacle Chapel, Aberystwyth on 19 December 1906. Arthur then joined Leeds City Police Force after he was made Sergeant in charge of the police horses, and the couple set up home at 15, St. Luke's Terrace, Leeds, with their young daughter Harriet. Arthur enlisted at Leeds into the Notts & Derby Regiment, but was transferred into the 13th Battalion, Yorkshire Regiment. The battalion formed at Richmond in July 1915 as a bantam Battalion, moving to Aldershot in 121 Brigade, 40th Division. On 6 June 1916 the Division landed at Le Havre, and moved to the line near Loos. Arthur was killed in action here on 23 August 1916. He was 31 years old, and is buried at Maroc British Cemetery, Grenay, France. The photograph of Arthur has been kindly supplied by Rebecca Rickets.

William Hope Hodgson, Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. William was born on 15 November 1877, the son of Reverend Samuel and Lissie S. Hodgson, of Lisswood, Borth. William became a well known photographer, poet and author prior to the war, after having spent many years at sea, providing for his family after the death of his father. He married Bessie Gertrude Farnworth at Kensington in 1913, and the couple resided at 14, Queens Road, Cheadle Hulme. After the outbreak of war, William was commissioned into the Royal Field Artillery, and landed in France on 5 October 1917, where he became attached to the 11th Army Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. William was listed as having died on 17 April 1918. He was 40 years old, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. William was possibly acting as an aerial observer with the Royal Flying Corps when he died, working on artillery spotting.

William J. Hughes, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. William cannot presently be identified.

Hugh James, Boatswain (Bosun), Mercantile Marine. Hugh was born at sea in 1881, the son of Hugh and Margaret James, of Borth. He married Mary Jane Bywater, and the couple resided at Manchester House, Borth. Hugh served in the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Penvearn, a Falmouth registered steamship. On 1 March 1918, Penvearn was 15 miles from South Stack, Anglesea, in ballast, when she was torpedoed and sank by the German submarine UB-48. Hugh was amongst 21 men who died in the sinking that day. He was 37 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Daniel Evan Jones, First Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Daniel was born in 1886, the son of Jenkin and Margaret Jones, of Caradog, Borth. He served as an engineer in the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Canganian, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 17 November 1916 she was on voyage from Methil to Scapa Flow when she struck a mine which had been laid by the German submarine UC-29, and sank with the loss of 13 lives. Daniel was 31 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David John Jones, Private, 129150, Canadian Infantry. David was born on 9 August 1887, the son of William David Jones and Elizabeth Jones, of Bodfor House, Borth. David emigrated to Canada prior to the war, where he worked as a Carpenter. He enlisted at Vancouver on 11 September 1915 into the Canadian Infantry, and was posted to the 72nd Battalion, British Columbia Regiment, which was attached to the 4th Canadian Division, and crossed to France in August 1916 after forming in southern England. The Division moved to the Somme, and took part in the Somme Offensive, fighting at the Battle of Le Transloy, and the Battle of the Ancre Heights, where they captured Regina Trench. David was killed at Le Sars on 1 November 1916, while patrolling in No Mans Land, when his party was caught up in a bomb fight with some Germans. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Adanac Military Cemetery, Miraumont, France.

David Kenneth Jones, Able Seaman, Mercantile Marine. David was born in 1901, the son of Edward and Mary Jones, of Glanmor House, Borth. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Heathpark, a steamship. On 5 October 1918, Heathpark was on voyage from Bilbao to Maryport with a cargo of ore, when she was sunk by the German submarine U-91 in the Bay of Biscay. David was among 15 men lost in the sinking. He was 16 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Henry James Jones. Henry was the son of Edward and Mary Jones, of Troedyrhiw, Borth. On 23 November 1917 he set out from Borth Bay aboard a small boat with James and Richard Davies, aiming to carry out some fishing, and also to salvage some floating debris, possibly cork, which they had seen floating in the bay. Nothing more was heard of them, so the lifeboat was launched at 05.00 pm, but no trace of the three was found. Their boat drifted ashore at Aberdovey bar later that day. Henry was just 13 years old, and because he is not a war casualty, is not commemorated by the CWGC.

Hugh Jones, Master, Mercantile Marine. Hugh was the son of David and Ann Jones of Borth. He married Anne Jane Edwards at Hull in 1906, and the couple set up home at Surrey House, Borth. Hugh served with the Mercantile Marine as Master of the SS Heathpark. On 5 October 1918, Heathpark was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-91 whilst in the Bay of Biscay. All her crew were lost at sea, but Hugh's body was found by Spanish Fishermen, who brought him ashore at Bilbao, and buried him at Bilbao British Cemetery, Spain. Hugh was 44 years old.

William Jones, Second Mate, Mercantile Marine. William was born at Borth in 1847. He must have gone to sea whilst young, as no further trace of him can be found locally, and by 1880 he was Master of the Swan. The ship was stranded on Hasborough Sands on 5 November 1880, and William lost his Master's certificate. He continued to serve at sea, and was torpedoed on 23 March 1918. William then served as Second Mate aboard the Cardiff registered SS Ruysdael. He was drowned when she was torpedoed by a German submarine in the North Atlantic on 7 September 1918. William was over 66 years old by then, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. William is not commemorated at Borth.

William John Jones, Driver, W/3765, Royal Field Artillery. William was born in 1892, the son of William and Jane Jones, of Bryn Y Mor, Borth. He lived at Gilfach Goch prior to the war, working as a bricklayer. William enlisted at Tonypandy on 23 April 1915 into the 38th (Welsh) Division Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery, and landed in France on 24 December 1915, joining up with the bulk of the 38th Division in the Fleurbaix sector. Very little is presently known of William, but he was discharged from the Royal Field Artillery on 11 December 1916 due to tuberculosis, and died at home in Craigfryn on 28 August 1917, aged 25. William's case was passed onto the CWGC on 5 August 2012, and he was accepted for commemoration on Thursday 7 August 2014.  He will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance, although he appears to have been buried in Llandre on 1 September 1917.

David Llewelyn Lewis, Boatswain (Bosun), Mercantile Marine. David was born in 1892, the son of Evan and Elizabeth Jane Lewis, of Dalston House, Borth. He served in the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Heathpark. On 5 October 1918, Heathpark was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-91 whilst in the Bay of Biscay. David was one of three Borth men killed aboard her that day. He was 26 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Morgan Lloyd, Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. John was born at Borth in 1865. He was a Royal Naval Reservist, and prior to the Great War was residing at 75, Broad Street, Barry. John was recalled to the colours in August 1914, and became Captain of the SS Firtree, whilst serving with the Royal Naval Reserve. He became ill, and died in hospital at Dakar on 2 December 1917, aged 51. John is buried at Dakar (Bell-Air) Cemetery, Senegal. He is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Desmond Maurice Macartney-Filgate, Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. Desmond was the son of Charles and Mary Macartney-Filgate, of Florence Place, Borth, and grandson of the late Townley Macartney-Filgate, of Lowtherstone, Balbriggan. He enlisted into the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, but was discharged after being found to be underage. He turned 18 in the 1917, and was commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps on 9 March 1918, being attached to the 42nd Training Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, where he trained as a pilot. Desmond was seriously injured in a training accident in May 1918, when his engine stalled on a training flight, causing his aircraft to dive into the ground. Desmond died on 31 May 1918, aged just 18. He is buried at Wye (Ss. Mary and Martin) Churchyard, England.

 

Reverend Edward Rupert Menlow Jenkins Menlove, Rifleman, R/23951, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Edward was born at St. Martin's, Oswestry, the son of Reverend John Jenkins Menlove and Mrs Lucy Mary Jenkins Menlove. His father was from Borth, and was vicar of St. Martin's, and the family often visited relatives back at Borth. Edward was educated at Ellesmere and Oxford prior to becoming curate of Rhos. He then became curate of Bodelwyddan, and lived at Tycelyn prior to the war. He enlisted into the King's Royal Rifle Corps and was posted to France in 1916, joining the 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps, which was attached to 2 Brigade, 1st Division. The division was on the Somme during the summer of 1916, preparing to take part in the Somme offensive. Edward was killed in action here on 9 September 1916, aged 31. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. Edward is commemorated at Bodelwyddan, but not at Borth.

Griffith Evans Morgan, Private, 26533, South Wales Borderers. Griffith was born in 1895, the son of James Richard and Anne Morgan, of Blaenwaen, Borth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the army, and was posted to the 5th Battalion, South Wales Borderers at some time after 1916, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. In 1916 the Division the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozieres and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved North to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, and fought on the Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. In 1918 the Division was caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where it suffered terrible casualties, before being withdrawn to Messines to rebuild, however it was again caught up in heavy fighting, suffering terrible casualties before being moved to the Aisne to rest and rebuild again. Unfortunately the Germans launched a fresh offensive on the Aisne soon after, and Griffith was killed in action there on 7 June 1918. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated on the Soissons Memorial, France.

Morgan Morgans, Sailor, Mercantile Marine. Morgan was born in 1889, the son of David and Mary Morgans, of Gogerddan House, Ynyslas, Borth. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Penvearn. On 1 March 1918, Penvearn was 15 miles from South Stack, Anglesey when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UB-48. Morgan was 29 years old when he died that day, and he is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Richard Standeford Pullen, MID, Lieutenant, South Staffordshire Regiment. Richard was the son of John Edward Pullen, of Standeford Mill, Wolverhampton, and the husband of Dora G. Pullen, of 84, Cleveland Road, Ealing, London. He had been commissioned on 10 April 1915 into the 1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, which was attached to 91 Brigade, 7th Division. Richard fought on the Somme with the division in 1916, and the following year it fought at Arras before moving to Ypres. He was killed near Ypres on 26 October 1917, aged 33, and is buried in Hooge Crater Cemetery, Belgium. Richard is not commemorated at Borth, although his son Geoffrey is.

Richard Rees, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. Richard was born at Borth in 1870, the son of Eliza Rees, of 3, New Street, Borth. His father was a mariner, and Richard followed in his footsteps by going to sea. Richard served on the SS War Tabard, a merchant steamship. He became ill, and died in hospital at Glasgow on 30 September 1918. No more is known of Richard, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Thomas Richards, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. Thomas cannot presently be identified.

 

William Llewellyn Roberts, Ordinary Seaman, Mercantile Marine. William was born at Borth in 1903, the son of son of John Henry and Margaret Roberts. The family later resided at 70, Sunbury Road, Liverpool. William served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Heathpark. On 5 October 1918, Heathpark was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-91 whilst in the Bay of Biscay. William was one of three Borth men killed aboard her that day. He was just 15 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

James Davies Williams, Private, 31899, 4th (Queen's Own) Hussars. James was born at Borth in 1891, the son of David and Annie Williams. The family later moved to 12, Hodson Street, Wigan, where James was raised. James enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 4th (Queen's Own) Hussars, which was attached to the 3rd Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division. James landed in France on 14 May 1915, joining the battalion after it had suffered heavy casualties in the Neuve Chapelle sector. The 2nd Cavalry Division didn't see much action during the whole of 1916, but in 1917 saw extensive fighting at Arras, and at Cambrai later in the year. The Cavalry was caught up in heavy fighting during the German offensive on the Somme in March 1918, then at the Lys the following month, and James was wounded during this desperate time. He was evacuated to hospital at Boulogne, where he died of his wounds on 26 April 1918. James was 27 years old, and is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France.

John Williams, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. John was the husband of Elizabeth Williams, of Eltham House, Borth. He was a long serving mariner, and had been home on leave when he suddenly died in June 1916, aged 60. He was buried at Penygarn Cemetery. John was not a casualty of war, so is not commemorated by the CWGC.

World War Two, 1939-1945

John Hayden Ellis, Boatswain, Merchant Navy. John was born at Borth in 1886, the son of John and Mary Ellis. He served in the Merchant Navy for many years prior to World War Two, his wife, Annie Ellis keeping the family home at Borth. John served aboard the SS Earls Park, a Greenock registered cargo steamer. On 12 June 1940, Earls Park was on voyage from Sunderland to Bordeaux, with a cargo of coal, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-101. John was 54 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Thomas Daniel Evans, Leading Aircraftman, 1176682, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Thomas was serving with the Royal Air Force, and was based at Singapore during the Japanese invasion of the Far East in December 1942. The fighting in Singapore lasted from 8–15 February 1942, when the huge garrison, comprising of around 80,000 British, Indian and Australian troops became prisoners of war, joining 50,000 taken by the Japanese in the Malayan Campaign. Sadly their surrender was in vain, as many of these men were destined to lose their lives in captivity under the tyrannical Japanese. Thomas died in captivity on 1 March 1943, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial.

Ieuan Morgan Griffiths, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. Ieuan was the son of John and Anne Griffiths, of Borth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Hamla, a London registered steam freighter. On 18 August 1942, Hamla was on route from Rio de Janeiro for Britain with a cargo of iron ore when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-506 and sunk. Ieuan was among the 42 men who died aboard her in the sinking. He was 34 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Emlyn Herbert, Master, Merchant Navy. John was the son of John and Margaretta Herbert, of Borth, and the husband of Edith Mary Herbert, of Heath, Cardiff. He served with the Merchant Navy as Captain aboard the SS Dungrange, a Grangemouth registered cargo steamer. After the Normandy invasion of 6 June 1944, Dungrange was employed in shipping arms, supplies and munitions to the Normandy Beach-head from the Isle of Wight. On 10 June 1944 she was on her third trip when a German E-boat attacked her off St Catherine’s Point, and sank the Dungrange with torpedoes. John was among 18 of her crew who perished that day. He was 45 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Raymond Hughes, Deck Boy, Merchant Navy. Raymond was the son of Richard David and Elizabeth Hughes, of Borth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Bradfyne, a Bideford registered steamship. On 22 November 1940, Bradfyne was on voyage from Montreal for Belfast, carrying 7,900 tons of grain, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-100. Raymond was one of 39 men who perished aboard her that day. He was just 16 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Richard James Jenkins, Private, S/120085, Royal Army Service Corps. Richard was the son of James and Elizabeth Jenkins, of Borth. He served with 5 Field Bakery, Royal Army Service Corps during the war. Richard probably died of wounds suffered during the evacuation of Dunkirk, at Thanet, Kent on 11 April 1940. He was 21 years old, and is buried at Borth (St. Matthew) Churchyard.

John Hubert Hughes Jones, Volunteer, Home Guard. John was the son of William David Jones, and of Elizabeth Jones, of Chepstow, Monmouthshire. He served with the 3rd City of London (Farringdon) Battalion, Home Guard. John died on active service on 9 September 1940. He was 34 years old, and is buried at Penygarn Calvinistic Methodist Cemetery, Tirymynach.

 

John Ivor Kinsey, First Radio Officer, Merchant Navy. John was the son of David Thomas Kinsey and Margretta Kinsey, of Borth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Dalblair, which was a Newcastle-on-Tyne registered cargo steamer. On 29 August 1940, Dalblair was on route from The Tyne for Philadelphia in ballast, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-100. John was among 24 men lost from a total crew of 42. He was 33 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Evan William Lewis, Boatswain, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of Evan and Elizabeth Jane Lewis, of Borth, and the husband of Mary Elizabeth Lewis, of Rhyl, Flintshire. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Bradfyne, a Bideford registered steamship. On 22 November 1940, Bradfyne was on voyage from Montreal for Belfast, carrying 7,900 tons of grain, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-100. Evan was one of 39 men who perished aboard her that day. He was 46 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Stanley Thomas Lloyd, Second Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. Stanley was the son of Thomas Jones Lloyd and of Alice Gertrude Lloyd (nee Harris), of Borth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Empire Turnstone, a London registered steamship. On 22 October 1942, Empire Turnstone was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-621, and sank off Iceland. Stanley was 36 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Fred Matthews, Army. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

William Milburn, Gunner, 794874, Royal Artillery. William was the son of Charles and Jane Elizabeth Milburn, and the husband of S. E. Milburn, of Borth. He served with 6 H.A.A. Regiment, Royal Artillery. The regiment sailed for the Far East in November 1941, and arrived at Singapore, where it was equipped. It then sailed for Sumatra on 30 January 1942, where it took up air defence duties for the local airfields. The following months, Japanese paratroopers attacked Sumatra, and the surviving garrison on the island was evacuated to Java. William was captured by the Japanese and some stage, and was sent to 114 Kilo Camp in Burma, working on the infamous 'death railway'. He died in the camp on 20 December 1943, aged 32, and is buried at Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery, Myanmar.

Frederick James Bill Moore, Petty Officer Supply, P/M 39205, Royal Navy. Frederick was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Henry Wells Moore, of Craigwen, Glanywern, Borth, and the husband of Ruth Phyllis Moore, of Lyminster, Sussex. He served with the Royal Navy aboard HMS Greyhound, a G-class destroyer. Greyhound took part in the Norwegian Campaign in April 1940, and then in the Dunkirk evacuation in May. Frederick suffered gunshot wounds to the chest during the evacuation and died at Horton Emergency Hospital, Epsom on 11 August 1940. He was 35 years old, and is buried at Portchester (St. Mary) Churchyard, Dorset.

 

Geoffrey Hiram Standeford Pullen, Pilot Officer, 62021, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Geoffrey was born at Wednesbury, Staffordshire in 1916 the son of Lt. Richard Standeford Pullen and Dora I. G. Pullen. His father had been killed at Ypres on 26 October 1917, whilst serving with the South Staffordshire Regiment, so Geoffrey never saw him. Geoffrey resided at Rose Cottage, Dolybont, Porth prior to the war, and became a pilot with 405 (R.C.A.F.) Squadron, Royal Air Force. No. 405 Squadron was formed at Driffield, Yorkshire, on 23 April 1941, and flew the RCAF's first bombing operation ten weeks later, equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Geoffrey was killed when his Wellington was shot down on one of the first raids, on 17 June 1941. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

 

David Daniel Jenkyn Richards, Aircraftman 1st Class, 1406999, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. David was the son of David and Jane Richards, of Borth, and the husband of Andree Jeanne Richards, of Newhaven, Edinburgh. He served with the Royal Air Force. David remained in the Royal Air Force after the war, and died at home on 23 May 1946. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Penygarn Calvinistic Methodist Cemetery, Tirymynach.

David Hughes Richards, Master, Merchant Navy. David was the son of Catherine Richards, of 1, London Place, Borth. He lived at Eversleigh, Borth, and served with the Merchant Navy as Master of the S.S. Grainton. David died at the College Hospital in New York on 30 December 1942, aged 63, following a fall. Nothing more is known of him as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

Elie (Eric) Robilliard, Master, Merchant Navy. Eric was the husband of Vera Robilliard, of Borth. He served in the Merchant Navy, and was Captain of the SS Creekirk, a London registered cargo steamer. On 18 October 1940, Creekirk was on route from Wabana, Conception Bay via Sydney to Workington, in Convoy SC-7, carrying a cargo of 5,900 tons of iron ore, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-101. Eric was among 36 men lost aboard her that day. He was 46 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Donald Rudd, Flying Officer (Air Bomber), 55213, Royal Air Force. Donald was the son of William John and Gladys Mary Edwards, of Borth. He served with the Royal Air Force, as an Air Bomber, with 550 Squadron, RAF. On the night of 28 July 1944, Donald was a serving as Air Bomber aboard a Lancaster III, Serial LM455, which took off from RAF North Killingholme, bound for Stuttgart. German night-fighters intercepted the force of almost 500 bombers, shooting down almost 19 percent of the aircraft on the outward flight. Donald's Lancaster was shot down and crashed near Blamont, Meurthe-et-Moselle, on the morning of 29 July 1944. Donald was 21 years old when he perished in the crash, and he is buried alongside his fellow crewmen at Blamont Communal Cemetery, France.

 

George William Smith, Corporal, 305538, Royal Horse Guards. George was the son of William and Dorothy Smith, and the husband of Gretta Smith, of Borth. He served with the 2nd Royal Horse Guards during the war. The unit formed part of the D-Day invasion force, as the reconnaissance force for the Guards Armoured Division, equipped with Daimler and Humber armoured cars. They took part in several dangerous assignments in Normandy, and in the subsequent break out from the beach-head, leading the Guards Division up through Northern France. George was killed during an engagement near Amiens on 1 September 1944. He was 23 years old, and is buried at St. Pierre Cemetery, Amiens, France. George is not commemorated at Borth.

 

David John Thomas, Second Officer, Merchant Navy. David was the son of David and Hannah Thomas, and the husband of Ellen Josephine Thomas, of Borth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Shelbrit II, a Swansea registered tanker. David died on 6 May 1940, aged 36, and is buried at Borth (St. Matthew) Churchyard. Shelbrit blew up and sank with the loss of all hands in the Moray Firth on 19 September 1940.

 

William David Thomas, Assistant Steward, Merchant Navy. William was the son of John Daniel and Lillian Thomas, of Borth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Clune Park, a Greenock registered cargo steamer. On 12 February 1941, Clune Park was part of Convoy SLS-64 on voyage from Freetown for Liverpool, and was about 200 miles southeast of the Azores when the German Cruiser Admiral Hipper sailed between the Convoy, and opened fire, sinking six ships and damaging another three before making her escape. Clune Park had been hit by several shells, but was still afloat, and transferred part of her crew to the SS Blairatholl. Eight men were lost in the transfer, one of whom was William. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

John Douglas Walters, Gunner, 920412, Royal Horse Artillery. John had been born at Borth, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Walters. The family later resided at Gwynfryn, Carmarthenshire.  John served with the 4th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery, which was formed at Helmieh, Egypt in May 1939, moving to Mersa Matruh in early 1940. The battery fired the opening rounds of the campaign in North Africa against the Italians at Sidi Barrani on 8 December 1940, and as part of the 7th Armoured Division, fought in the Western Desert campaign, seeing action again in January 1941 at Bardia, the capture of Tobruk, and at Beda Fomm. John was killed during a period of intense pressure on the British lines around Tobruk on 30 May 1942. He was 26 years old, and is buried at Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Acroma, Libya.

 

Peter Mitchell Weldon, Deck Boy, Merchant Navy. Peter was born at Borth on 3 June 1920, the son of Charles Weldon and Catherine Weldon (nee Groome). He served with the Merchant Navy as a deck boy aboard the M.V. African Prince. Little is known of Peter but he was reported to have been shot dead by the military authorities in Rangoon on 3 March 1942, aged 19. He is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Enoch Gwynfryn Williams, Sergeant (Navigator), 1582620, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Enoch was the son of Thomas and Mary Williams, of Borth, and the husband of Joyce R. Williams, of Whitmore Reans, Wolverhampton. He served as a Navigator with the Royal Air Force. Enoch was killed when his aircraft crashed during a training exercise in Shropshire on 13 January 1945. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Wolverhampton Borough Cemetery, England.

 

Evan James Williams, Master, Merchant Navy. Evan was the son of Richard and Mary Williams, of Borth, and the husband of Margaret Jane Williams, of Childwall, Liverpool. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Earlspark, a Greenock registered steamer. On 12 June 1940, Earls Park was on voyage from Sunderland to Bordeaux, with a cargo of coal, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-101. Evan was 59 years old when he died that day, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Harry Williams, Royal Air Force. This man cannot presently be identified.

 

Howard Lloyd Williams, Quartermaster, Merchant Navy. Howard was the son of Richard and Mary Williams, of Borth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the MV Abosso, a Liverpool registered ocean liner. On 29 October 1942, Abosso was on voyage from Cape Town to Liverpool, when she was attacked and sunk by the German submarine U-575. Only 31 people survived the sinking, out of around 182 crew, 20 gunners, and 190 passengers aboard. Howard was amongst the dead that day. He was 25 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

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Website News

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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