West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Llanarth War Memorial

Llanarth is located on the A487 between Aberystwyth and Cardigan, situated on the crossroads to New Quay. The ancient parish Church, dedicated to St David, is around 800 years old, and contains an ancient cross inscribed with the Ogham script. The men of the Parish who fell during both World Wars are commemorated on two plaques within Llanarth Memorial Hall.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Alfred Canham, Private, 131070, Machine Gun Corps. Alfred was born at Islington, London, probably the son of Francis and Mary Canham. He lived in Cross Inn prior to the war, probably working as a farm servant, and enlisted at Brecon into the Welsh Regiment. He was posted to France at some time after 1916, and was then transferred to the 21st Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, which was attached to the 21st Division. In March 1917 the division followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and in April fought at Arras. Later in 1917 it moved to Ypres, and took part in the Third Battle ofYpres, before moving again, and taking part in the Battle of Cambrai. The division was one of the units hit by the German Spring Offensive on the Somme in March 1918, fighting at the Battle of St Quentin and the First Battle of Bapaume, before being evacuated to Flanders to rest. Unluckily though, the Germans launched a fresh offensive on the Lys in April 1918, and the division was caught up in the thick of the fighting again, during the Battle of Messines. Alfred was killed in action during the heavy fighting that followed, on 27 April 1918. He was possibly 20 years old, and is buried in Voormezeele Enclosure No. 3, Belgium. Alfred is not commemorated locally.

Thomas Cook, Private, 320301, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at Maidstone, but had resided at Llanarth for several years prior to the war, working as a farm labourer. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the Pembroke Yeomanry. During March 1916 the 1/1st Pembroke Yeomanry moved to Egypt, where it merged with the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade and formed the 4th Dismounted Brigade. On 2 February 1917 it merged with the 1/1st Glamorgan Yeomanry to form the 24th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and became attached to 231 Brigade, 74th (Yeomanry) Division. The Division had formed in Egypt in January 1917 and had fought through the Palestinian Campaign, at the Battles of Gaza and the Battle and capture of Jerusalem. Thomas was killed during the Third Battle of Gaza on 6 November 1917. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel.

Jenkin Davies, Private, 44251, King's Liverpool Regiment. Jenkin was the son of Griffith and Margaret Davies, of Llanarth. He enlisted at Lampeter into the South Wales Borderers, but was subsequently transferred to the 18th Battalion, King's Liverpool Regiment, which was attached to 89 Brigade, 30th Division. The Division moved to France in November 1915, and took part in its first major action during the Somme Offensive, at the Battle of Albert, where they captured Montauban. They then fought during the latter stages of the offensive, during the Battle of Le Transloy, before wintering on the Somme. In March 1917 the Division followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and in April took part in the First Battle of the Scarpe, and then at the later Second Battle of the Scarpe. Later that year they were moved north to Ypres. Jenkin was wounded soon after arriving at Ypres, and was evacuated to the Casualty Clearing Station at Remy Sidings where he died of his wounds on 15 June 1917. Jenkin was 38 years old, and is buried at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Thomas Davies, Able Seaman, Mercantile Marine. Thomas was the son of James and Ruth Davies, of The Llanina Arms, Llanarth. He served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the SS Northfield, a Cardiff registered merchant steamer. On 3 March 1918, Northfield was 25 miles from Lundy Island when she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine, with the loss of 15 lives. Thomas was just 17 years old when he drowned that day, and he is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Owen Enoch, Lance Sergeant, 21753, South Wales Borderers. Owen was the son of Enoch Enoch, of Felin Wern, Llanina. He resided at Tycroes prior to the war, where he ran his own Drapery business, and enlisted at Newport into the 5th Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division, which moved to France during July 1915, taking up positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. Owen landed in France on 4 December 1915, joining the battalion at Loos. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozieres and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved North to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, and fought on the Menin Road and at Polygon Wood, before moving up to Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. In 1918 they were caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where they suffered terrible casualties, and fought at the Battle of Bapaume. They moved to Ypres, but were caught up in the German attack at Messines, and at Bailleul, and Kemmel. After suffering terribly again, they moved South to the quieter French sector to rebuild, but were caught up in the German offensive on the Aisne. Owen was killed in action here, during the Battle of the Aisne, on 6 June 1918, aged 38. He is buried at La Neuville-Aux-Larris Military Cemetery, France.

Evan Evans, Lance Corporal, 27776, Welsh Regiment. Evan was the husband of Hannah Evans, of Bryn Isaf, Cross Inn. He enlisted at Pentre into the 18th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (2nd Glamorgan), which was a bantam battalion, attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division moved to France during the first week of June 1916, and moved to the front near Loos. Late in 1916 it moved south to the Somme, fighting at the Battle of the Ancre, and remained in the area over the winter. In March 1917 the Germans withdrew to their shortened line, called the Hindenburg Line, and the 40th Division was one of the Divisions that followed the withdrawal. Later in the year it took part in the Battle of Cambrai, playing an important role in the attack on Bourlon Wood. Evan was killed in Bourlon Wood on 23 November 1917, aged 36. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France. Evan does not appear to be commemorated locally.

Jenkin Dewi Evans, Sailor, Mercantile Marine. Jenkin was born in 1900, the son of David and Sarah Evans, of Rhiw Awel, Llangareglwyd, Llanarth. He served with the Mercantile Marine, aboard the SS Lord Byron. The ship was serving in the Mediterranean when Jenkin took ill, and he died on 30 March 1918, aged 17, at Taranto. Jenkin was buried at Taranto Town Cemetery Extension, Italy.

John Watkin Evans, Private, 11897, Gloucestershire Regiment. John was the son of David and Mary Evans, of Maesyreglwys, Llanarth. He worked as a Draper at Whiteley's, London prior to the war, and enlisted at Westminster into the army. John was posted to the 1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division had been one of the first to arrive in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and taking part in the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, and at Chivy, before being moved north to Ypres. Here they fought at the First Battle of Ypres, where they again stopped the German Offensive, before wintering in Flanders. John joined the battalion here on 2 February 1915, and took part in the Battle of Aubers Ridge several months later. John was killed in action here on 29 June 1915. He was 27 years old, and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg L'Avoue, France.

David Griffiths, Private, 12967, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. David was working at Tumble at the outbreak of war, and enlisted there into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The Division moved to France during July 1915, and moved to positions near Loos, where it took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozières and the Ancre in 1916. In 1917 the Division moved north to Ypres, taking part in the Battle of Messines, and fought on the Menin Road and at Polygon Wood, before moving up to Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. In 1918 they were caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where they suffered terrible casualties. David was killed here on 22 March 1918. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

Evan James, Private, 26808, South Wales Borderers. Evan was born on 28 June 1894, the son of Stephen and Eliza James, of Blaenrhos, Cross Inn. He was a theological student before enlisting at Newport on 28 March 1916 into the South Wales Borderers, and was posted to the 5th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. He joined the battalion in France on 24 June 1916, and fought with them throughout the Somme offensive that summer. He took ill in France, and returned to Britain, spending several months in hospital before being discharged from the army as unfit on 11 July 1917. Evan died at home on 29 August 1917, aged 23, and is buried in Brynrhiwgaled Independent Chapelyard. He does not appear to be commemorated locally.     

Enoch Jenkins, Private, M/349914, Royal Army Service Corps. Owen was born in 1894, the son of Mary Jenkins, of Blaenyryngoed, Llanarth. He resided with his wife, Rachel Jenkins, at Llanarth prior to the war. Enoch enlisted at Caerphilly into the Army Service Corps, and was posted to France with the 6th Auxiliary Petrol Company, Mechanical Transport, Army Service Corps. Enoch was hospitalised at Wimille during the summer of 1918, and died there on 7 August 1918, aged 24. He is buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France.

Jenkin Isaac Jenkins, Private, 39874, Welsh Regiment. Jenkin was born in 1894, the son of Elinor Jenkins, of Blaendyffryn, Llanarth. He enlisted at Lampeter into the 8th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion formed at Cardiff in August 1914, joining 40 Brigade, 13th Division, and on 15 June 1915 sailed from Avonmouth for Mudros. The Division landed at Anzac, Gallipoli on 5 August 1915, and took part in heavy fighting in the coming days. In December 1915 the Division left Gallipoli for Egypt, before moving into Mesopotamia in February 1916. Jenkin took part in the operation to relieve the besieged city of Kut, but died during the expedition, on 29 June 1916. He was 23 years old, and is buried at Amara War Cemetery, Iraq.

Arthur Jones, Private, 14213, South Wales Borderers. Arthur was the son of William and Anne Jones, of Llanarth Villa, Llanarth. He enlisted at Aberystwyth into the 4th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 40 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division. On 15 June 1915 the Division sailed from Avonmouth for Mudros. The Division landed at Anzac, Gallipoli on 5 August 1915, and took part in heavy fighting in the coming days. In December 1915 the Division left Gallipoli for Egypt, before moving into Mesopotamia in February 1916. Arthur took part in the operation to relieve General Townsend's besieged garrison at the city of Kut, but was killed in action on 9 April 1916, He was just 18 years old, and is buried at Amara War Cemetery, Iraq.

Evan Lewis Jones, Second Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. Evan was the son of Benjamin and Elizabeth Jones, of Gofynachfawr, Llanarth. He was a schoolteacher prior to being commissioned early in 1916 into the 10th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment. Evan was then attached to the 76th Brigade, Machine Gun Corps, which was attached to the 3rd Division. One of the first formations in France, the 3rd Division was still at Ypres early in 1916, where it fought at the Actions of the Bluff, and at the St Eloi Craters. They were then moved south to the Somme, and fought there at the Battle of Albert, and the Battle of Bazentin, where they captured Longueval. They then took part in the Battle of Delville Wood. The next major action for the Division was during the Battle of the Ancre, and it was here, on 13 November 1916, that Evan was killed. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Bertrancourt Military Cemetery, France.

David Handel Lewis, Private, 23756, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of Mrs. Sarah Evans, of Rhiwawel, Llaingareglwyd, Llanarth. He enlisted at Cardiff into the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the Cardiff City Battalion, attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 2 December 1915 the battalion moved to France, and the entire Division moved to the Fleurbaix sector, where it was initiated into trench warfare. During June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, and on 7 July 1916 attacked Mametz Wood. The initial attack failed, and it was three days later, on 10 July, that a fresh attack was mounted. After two days of heavy hand to hand fighting within the wood, the Germans withdrew, and the battered Welshmen moved via Hebuterne to Boesinghe, on the Yser Canal. On 5 September 1916, the 16th Welsh was positioned around Machine Gun Farm, preparing for relief by the 14th Welsh. The War Diary shows that the day was quiet, but fails to mention that David was killed that day. He was 32 years old, and is buried at Essex Farm Cemetery, Belgium.

Griffith Lewis, Mercantile Marine. Griffith was born in 1871 at Aberayron, the son of Mary Lewis. He resided with his wife, Annie Ellen Lewis, at Aldborough, Aberaeron, and was a long serving mariner. At the outbreak of war, Griffith served with the Mercantile Marine as Captain of the SS Oaklands Grange. Griffith died of malarial fever aboard his ship on 21 October 1917, and was buried at sea. He is not a casualty of war, so is not commemorated by the CWGC.

John Owen Lloyd, Gunner, 69895, Royal Field Artillery. John was the son of John and Mary Lloyd, of Cwmneuadd, Llanarth. He enlisted at Pontypridd into the Royal Artillery, and was posted to France with the 121st Battery, 27th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 5th Division. John had landed at Havre with the Division on 15 August 1914, and fought at the Battle of Mons, and during the retreat south, fighting at Le Cateau, then down to the Marne where the German attack was halted. They took part in the advance to the Aisne, before moving to Flanders, where they fought at the Battle of La Bassée, then at Messines in October, 1914. They fought here through First Ypres, and took part in the capture of Hill 60, and then fought at Second Ypres in April 1915, before John had the opportunity to return home on leave. March 1916 saw the Division moving to positions between St. Laurent-Blangy and Vimy, near Arras, and the Division saw plenty of action during its spell here. On 1 July 1916 the Battle of the Somme opened, and the Division moved south, taking part in the Battles of High Wood and Guillemont. John was killed in action during the ensuing Battle of Flers-Courcelette, on 17 September 1916, aged 20. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Edward Francis Longcroft, Second Lieutenant, Pembroke Yeomanry. Edward was born at Llanarth in 1885, was the son of Captain Charles Edward Longcroft, and of Catherine Alicia Longcroft, of Llanina. He was educated at Clifton College and at Cirencester, and at the outbreak of war enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment. Edward was immediately commissioned into the Pembroke Yeomanry. He caught a chill whilst in camp, and whilst he was in hospital he underwent a knee operation. Edward died in hospital on 30 November 1914, aged 29, and was buried at Brompton Cemetery, after a funeral service at St. Stephen's Church, Westminster. Edward is not commemorated by the CWGC.

Stephen Rees, Sapper, 158336, Royal Engineers. Stephen was the son of John Morgan Rees, and Elizabeth Rees, of Pantisdaufan, Llanarth. He was a coalminer at Caerau Colliery prior to the war, and enlisted at Bridgend into the Royal Engineers, being posted to France with the 257th Tunnelling Company, Royal Engineers. The Company was moved to the Flanders Coast in the summer of 1917, where it was set to work digging dugouts near the front, in readiness for a possible attack, Stephen was killed in action here on 12 August 1917. He was 29 years old, and is buried at Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium.

David Thomas, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. David was born on 29 May 1893, the son of John and Mary Ann Thomas, of Tegfan, Cross Inn, Synod Inn. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Treglisson, a 2,512 tonne cargo steamer. At the outbreak of war, Treglisson was detained by the Germans at Bremen and used as a prison ship between 1914 and 1919, her crew being interned in Ruhleben Prisoner of War camp in Germany for the duration. After the war, she was returned to her owners. David died of blood poisoning in the Lazarette, Ruhleben on 27 May 1917, aged 23, and is buried in Ruhleben, Germany. Thanks to Emyr Langley for the details and the photos of David. David appears to have been recently accepted for commemoration by the CWGC and will be commemorated on the Cologne Memorial, Germany, but oddly his date of death with the CWGC is incorrect.

World War Two, 1939-1945

Alfred Wyndham Evans, Seaman, Merchant Navy. Alfred was known as Wyn, and was the son of William David and Catherine Grace Evans, of Golan, Gilfachrheda. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the S.S. British Sovereign. Wyn was killed while unloading munitions at Abadan, Iran on 3 May 1944, aged 28, and is buried in the English Cemetery at Abadan. He is not commemorated by the CWGC. Thanks to Wyn Edwards for details and the photo of his uncle.

John Evan Evans, Master, Merchant Navy. John was the Master of the SS Empire Leopard, a London registered cargo steamer. On 2 November 1942, Empire Leopard was on voyage from St John's, Newfoundland to Belfast and Avonmouth, with a cargo of zinc, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-402. 37 men of a total of 41 were lost in the sinking. John was 37 years old when he drowned that day, and he is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David Warren James, Master, Merchant Navy. David was the son of Captain John James and Mrs. James, of New Quay, and the husband of Sarah Morfydd James, of Pontardulais. He was a long serving Merchant Seaman, being Master of the SS Anchises (Liverpool), he had received a King's Commendation for Brave Conduct. The Anchises was attacked and bombed by Focke-Wolf Condors, on 27 February 1941. Stricken, she was re-attacked by a Focke-Wolfe Condor the following day, and sunk. David went down with her on 28 February. He was 50 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Elias Tudor Jones, Carpenter, Merchant Navy. Elias was the son of Margaret and David Jones, of Llanarth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Empire Leopard, a London registered cargo steamer. On 2 November 1942, Empire Leopard was on voyage from St John's, Newfoundland to Belfast and Avonmouth, with a cargo of zinc, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-402. 37 men of a total of 41 were lost in the sinking. Elias was 35 years old when he drowned that day, and he is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Owain Gwynfor Jones, Flight Sergeant (Pilot), 570249, Royal Air Force. Owain was the son of John Owen and Margaret Eleanor Jones, of Llanarth. He served as a Pilot with 112 Squadron, Royal Air Force, which was based in Sicily after the invasion of the Island on 10 July 1943, operating the Curtiss P40-Kittyhawk. In February 1945 the Squadron converted to the Mustang MkIV, and supported the ground assault troops in the Italian Campaign. Owain was killed when his aeroplane crashed during operations over Italy on 11 March 1945. He was 25 years old, and is buried at Padua War Cemetery, Italy.

William Robert Jones, Third Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy. William was the son of Thomas Lewis Jones and Ellen Jane Jones, and the husband of Hannah Amelia Jones, of Llanarth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Harmala, a London registered cargo steamer. On 7 February 1943, Harmala was on route from Rio de Janeiro via New York and Halifax to Middlesbrough, as part of Convoy SC-118, carrying a cargo of iron ore, when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine U-614. William was 33 years old when he drowned that day, and he is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

David Jones Thomas, Boatswain, Merchant Navy. David was the son of William and Nellie Thomas, of Frondeg, Llanarth, and served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Ramillies, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 8 May 1941, Ramillies was in the Atlantic, having been dispersed from Convoy OB-317, when she was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-97. The ship shuddered to a halt, and the Germans fired another torpedo at her, sinking her. David was among 29 men lost in the sinking of Ramillies that day, and he is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His brother Francis was also lost in the sinking.

Francis James Thomas, Seaman, Merchant Navy. Francis was the son of William and Nellie Thomas, of Frondeg, Llanarth, and the husband of Eleanor Ann Thomas, of Blaenavon, Monmouthshire. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Ramillies, a Cardiff registered steamer. On 8 May 1941, Ramillies was in the Atlantic, having been dispersed from Convoy OB-317, when she was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-97. The ship shuddered to a halt, and the Germans fired another torpedo at her, sinking her. Francis was among 29 men lost in the sinking of Ramillies that day. He was 30 years old, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His brother David was also lost in the sinking.

James Lewis Thomas, Second Officer, Merchant Navy. James was the son of Lewis and Mary Thomas, and the husband of Mary Ellen Thomas, of Llanarth. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Sesostris, an Egyptian steamer. On 29 January 1941, Sesostris was in convoy from Halifax to Liverpool, when she was sunk with all hands during a submarine attack. James is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

 

Margaret Thomas, Civilian. Margaret was the daughter of James and Ruth Davies, of Llanina Hotel, Llanarth. She lived at 9, Lochinvar Street, Wandsworth with her husband Timothy Edgar Lewis Thomas prior to the war. Timothy had gone off to war, and Margaret was alone in her house when it was hit by a doodlebug on 19 June 1944, killing Margaret, who was 44 years old. Margaret is not commemorated at Llanarth.

DONATIONS. If you find this website of use, please think about donating to help cover the costs of the huge amount of work and the continual costs of keeping the website on-line. Donations can be made using the Paypal link below, or by contacting the author via the Contact page.

Website News

4 November 2017. Some good news this week following the discovery, after much searching, of the grave of Private Thomas Davies, of Laugharne. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers page of the website for details.

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

Get social with us.

Print Print | Sitemap
Copyright © 2003-2018 West Wales War Memorial Project