West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Amroth War Memorial

Amroth is situated just seven miles from Tenby and four miles from Saundersfoot. It is a small coastal village set within along a beautiful stretch of coastline, with some breathtaking countryside and coastline surrounding it. The memory of those from Amroth and nearby Stepaside who served and fell during the Great War is commemorated by a beautifully coloured roll of honour situated inside the Parish Church of St. Elidyr. The photograph of the roll was kindly sent in by Ruth Roberts.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Terence Kennet James Baldwin, Lieutenant, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). Terence was born in Aldbourne, Wiltshire in 1894, the son of Francis John Augustus Baldwin, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., L.S.A., and Emily Lydia, his wife. He had married Addie Stansfield prior to the war. Terence was commissioned into the Royal Lancaster Regiment, and was posted to their 5th Battalion, part of 164 Brigade, 55th (West Lancashire) Division. By 20 January 1918, Terence had been made full Lieutenant. The Division had been battered at the Battle of Cambrai over the winter of 1917/1918, and relieved 42nd (East Lancashire) Division in the front line at Givenchy and Festubert on 15 February 1918. It faced numerous strong German raids in March, diversions to the main attack on the Somme at the time. Terence was killed during one of these minor actions on 20 March 1918. He was 25 years old and is buried at Croix-du-Bac British Cemetery, Steenwerck.

Joseph Bowen, Rifleman, R/5283, Kings Royal Rifle Corps. Joseph was the son of William and Elizabeth Bowen, of Amroth. He resided at Pontycymmer with his wife Elizabeth Ann and their children prior to the war, and enlisted at Bridgend into the Army, where he served as a regular soldier. He was posted to the 2nd Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, which was part of 2 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division had been one of the first to arrive in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and taking part in the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, and at Chivy, before being moved north to Ypres. Here they fought at the First Battle of Ypres, where they again stopped the German Offensive, before wintering in Flanders. The following year saw them in action again at the Battle of Aubers, before moving South to Loos, where they fought during the Battle of Loos, and the action at the Hohenzollern redoubt. Again they were required for a major offensive, moving south to the Somme, where they fought during the opening of the Somme Offensive at the Battle of Albert. John was wounded during the initial weeks of the battle, and evacuated to the Casualty Clearing Station at Warloy-Baillon, where he died of his wounds on 25 July 1916, aged 39. Joseph is buried there, at Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

Lawrence Robert Vaughan Colby, Major, Grenadier Guards. Lawrence was born on 3 April 1880, the only son of John Vaughan Colby, of Ffynone, Pembrokeshire, and Anne Harriet Colby. Lawrence was a pre-war regular in the Army, and at the outbreak of war served as a Major with the 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards, attached to 20 Brigade, 7th Division. The Division was formed during September, 1914 and landed at Zeebrugge on 6 October, 1914. The City was already falling however, and so the Division was moved to Ypres, where they became the first British Division to hold the city. They fought during the First Battle of Ypres, and helped stop the German advance through Belgium. Lawrence was sadly killed in action at Ypres on 24 October, 1914. He was 34 years old, and has no known grave, and so is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

John Richard Cousins, Private, 62467, Welsh Regiment. John was the son of Daniel and Elizabeth Cousins, of Stepaside. He had enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The 53rd (Welsh) Division moved to the Mediterranean, sailing from Devonport in July, 1915 arriving at Mudros by 5 August, 1915. From here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here they immediately faced the chaotic leadership that was to lead to the ultimate failure of the campaign, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, and in early 1917 moved into Palestine, where they remained for the duration of the war, fighting at the Battles of Gaza, and successfully capturing Jerusalem. At some time around the capture of Jerusalem, John was taken ill. He was brought back to Britain for treatment, but sadly died of sickness on 16 March 1918. He is buried at Amroth (St. Elidir) Churchyard.

Edward John Cutcliffe, Private, 57136, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Edward was born at Amroth, the son of William Henry and Martha Jane Cutcliffe. The family later moved to Wynlerg, Church Park, Tenby. He originally enlisted into the Welsh Regiment, but later transferred into the 2nd Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which had been in France since the outbreak of war, attached to 19 Brigade. The Brigade was used to plug gaps in badly depleted divisions. Towards the end of the war, Edward was attached to 121 Brigade Headquarters, and he died of illness on 5 October 1918 in Flanders. He was 31 years old, and is buried at La Kreule Military Cemetery, Hazebrouck, France.

Thomas Henry John, Private, 38127, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at Amroth, the son of Thomas and Priscilla John. Thomas was a miner, and resided with his wife Mary and their family at Trebanog prior to the war, enlisting at nearby Tonypandy into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion was known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion, and was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. In the summer of 1915 the Battalion moved with the remainder of the Welsh Division to Morn Hill Camp, Winchester, where it completed its training and equipping, and embarked for France from Folkestone on 5 December 1915, disembarking at Boulogne the same day. During the winter and spring of 1916 the Battalion held the line in the Armentières sector, and at the end of May, 1916 moved South with the remainder of the 38th (Welsh) Division to the Somme area, in readiness for the First Battle of The Somme. The 38th Division was tasked with the taking of the infamous Mametz Wood, with the first attack going in on 7 July, when the division lost heavily in 'Death Valley' during the advance on the 'Hammer Head'. The next attack went in on 10 July and by 12 July the wood was cleared - but at the cost of over 5,000 casualties in the 38th (Welsh) Division. Thomas was killed in action during the attack on 11 July 1916, aged 35. His body was lost during the coming fighting over the area, and so he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. Thomas is not commemorated at Amroth.

William David John, Private, 20006, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of William and Elizabeth John, of Stagger's Hill, Stepaside. He had lived at Amroth prior to the outbreak of war, and enlisted at Pembroke into the Army, opting to join the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment- the ‘Carmarthen Pals’. The battalion had formed in Rhyl in October 1914 as part of the 43rd (Welsh) Division. In mid 1915 the formation became the 38th (Welsh) Division, and the 15th Welsh joined 114 Brigade. William landed in France with the battalion on 4 December 1915, and saw action with them in Flanders before their move to the Somme in June 1916. He survived the terrible fighting at Mametz Wood from 7 July to 11 July 1916, and moved with them to positions north of Ypres, on the Canal Bank at Boesinghe the following month. William was killed in action at Boesinghe on 14 March 1917 by a barrage of German Trench Mortar fire. He was 22 years old, and is buried at Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.

Walter Thomas Parry, Rifleman, 374671, London Regiment. Walter was born in Amroth, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Parry. He was a postman prior to the war, and lived with his wife Grace Hannah Parry at 114, Heath Terrace, Bradford. He enlisted there into the Army and joined the 8th Battalion, London Regiment, the ‘Post Office Rifles’. The battalion was attached to 140 Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division, which had been in France since March 1915. The Division fought at the Battle of Aubers, and the Battle of Festubert during May, 1915 and in September fought at the Battle of Loos, and subsequent Action of Hohenzollern Redoubt. They were north of Arras when the Germans attacked Vimy Ridge, and then moved south to the Somme, where they fought at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, and then at the Battle of Le Transloy, where the Division captured Eaucourt l'Abbe, and took part in Attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. Early in 1917 the Division moved north to Belgium, and took part in the Battle of Messines. Walter was killed in the later Battle of Passchendaele, on 30 October 1917, aged 42. His body was not recovered from the battlefield, and so he is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Peter Thomas Phelps, Private, 4782, Pembroke Yeomanry. Peter was the son of Thomas and Bridget Phelps, of Trelissy, Amroth. He had enlisted at Carmarthen into the 1st Battalion, Pembroke Yeomanry at the outbreak of war, and sailed with the battalion in March 1916 to Egypt. Peter sadly took ill and died at Wadi-Natrun, Egypt on 22 June 1916. He was 27 years old, and was buried by his comrades at Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

David Wilkins, Corporal, 8204, Duke of Edinburgh’s Wiltshire Regiment. David was born at Amroth in 1891, the son of Esther Wilkins, of Skerry Back. He enlisted at Salisbury into the Army as a regular soldier, joining the 2nd Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment. At the outbreak of war, the battalion was in Gibraltar, but was rushed back to Britain where it joined 21 Brigade, 7th Division. The division was to be one of the finest British Divisions of the war. It landed at Zeebrugge on 6 October, 1914 to garrison the city, however the City was already falling, and so the Division was moved to Ypres, where they became the first British Division to hold the city. They fought during the First Battle of Ypres, and helped stop the German advance through Belgium, but at a heavy cost. David was killed in action at Ypres on 24 October 1914, aged 23. His grave was lost in the coming four years of fighting in the area, and so he is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

William Arthur Williams, Corporal, 6356, Cavalry. William was the grandson of Martha Richards, of the New Inn, near Marros. He appears to have been the illegitimate son of Martha’s daughter, Leah Jane Williams. William worked as a farm servant for William Ebsworth at Marros Farm before he moved to Ystalyfera and married Gladys Baber, of 22, Canal Street, Ystalyfera, in 1913. William enlisted into the 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own) prior to the war and landed in France on 19 October 1914, joining the 2nd Life Guards, which was under command of the 7th Cavalry Brigade, 3rd Cavalry Division. William joined up with the division in time to take part in the First Battle of Ypres, where the vastly outnumbered BEF stopped the German drive towards the Channel ports by holding the city of Ypres. The division wintered in the Ypres Salient and became caught up in another German offensive just months later, the Second Battle of Ypres, which was launched on 22 April 1915. The opening of the battle was heralded by the first use of poison gas when the Germans launched a gas attack against the French Colonial troops at Gravenstafel. Only brave fighting by the Canadians stopped a break-through, but the battle continued to rage. After weeks of continual fighting, by the second week of May William was in the front line with the 2nd Life Guards near Frezenberg Ridge. At 4 am on 13 May 1915 a heavy artillery barrage opened up on the British line around Ypres, and was followed by a massed attack by the German infantry. During a terrible day of fighting, the 3rd Cavalry Division lost over 90 officers and 1,500 men. William, who was 28 years old, was among those killed on 13 May. He has no known grave and is commemorated on panel 5 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. His widow Gladys later remarried and lived at 4, Emma's Buildings, Hill Street, Hull. William is not commemorated locally, but is named on the Ystalyfera War Memorial.

They Also Served

 

The largest section of the Amroth Roll of Honour contains details of the locals who served during the war, yet survived and returned home. The names are not in alphabetical order on the roll and are most likely in order of date of enlistment, but I have shown them below in alphabetical order, for ease of reading. Also shown below are several men who have been omitted from the roll, but who are known to have been from Amroth.

 

Alfred Edward Allen, Corporal, 105th US Infantry. Alfred was born in Amroth on 18 February 1894, the son of Edwin and Martha Allen. He emigrated to America prior to the war and enlisted there into the 105th Infantry Regiment, US Expeditionary Force. Alfred served with the regiment in France in 1918 and returned to America after the Armistice. He died on 16 July 1979 and is buried in St. John’s Cemetery, Brunswick, New York. His brother Thomas Allen was my great grandfather.

 

William George Arthur Badham, Sapper, WR/31013, Royal Engineers. William was born in Amroth on 22 July 1885, the son of George and Frances Badham. He married Lavinia Griffiths in 1910 and the couple lived in Sea View, Amroth before moving to Summerhill. William enlisted into the Pembroke Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery on 26 August 1915 before being transferred to the 810th Road Construction Company, Royal Engineers and embarked for France on 27 March 1918. William served in France until after the Armistice and was discharged from the army on 4 July 1919, returning home to Summerhill. He died in 1961.

 

Francis Charles Brian Baldwin, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. Francis was born in London on 13 April 1888, the son of Francis John Augustus Baldwin and Emily Lydia Baldwin. The family later resided at Amroth following the retirement of his father, who had been a Doctor in Gambia. Francis had already served with the 4th Welsh Territorials before enlisting at Pembroke Dock into the Royal Engineers on 5 September 1910. Following the outbreak of war he served in France until being wounded in the leg and returned to England in September 1915. He married Elizabeth Harries at Llawhaden on 18 January 1916. On 2 November 1918 Francis received a commission as Second Lieutenant with the Royal Engineers. He survived the war and died in Hampshire in 1969.

 

David Beynon, Corporal, South African Engineers. David was possibly born in Marros in 1871, the son of William and Ann Beynon. The roll of honour states that he served at home with the South African Engineers, so he most likely served in the East African campaign. Nothing further is presently known of him.

 

Howard Vernon Bowen, Signaller, 24th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Howard was born on 9 May 1892, the son of Henry and Hannah Bowen, of Pen-y-Bont Farm, Amroth. He enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry and trained with the Yeomanry in Norfolk before embarking for Egypt early in 1916. In March 1917 the regiment merged with the Glamorgan Yeomanry to form the 24th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which became attached to the 74th (Yeomanry) Division. The division took part in the offensive in Palestine and the liberation of Jerusalem before being ordered to France in May 1918 to take part in the final offensive which finally won the war. Upon being demobilised Howard returned home and married Gwladys Mary Bushell in 1921. He died on 6 March 1956.

 

Alfred Callen, Private, 130339, Machine Gun Corps. Alfred was the son of John and Mary Callen, of Long Lane, Amroth. He enlisted into the army on 17 January 1916 and served in France with the Machine Gun Corps. Alfred was discharged from the army on 9 May 1919 and returned to Amroth where he married May Jane Garvie in 1919. He died on 6 February 1958 and is buried in the cemetery at Mountain Chapel, Llanteg.

 

Thomas William Callen, Private, 33183, Hampshire Regiment. Thomas was born on 14 April 1892, the son of William and Elizabeth Callan, of Long Lane, Amroth. He married Mabel Morris in 1915 prior to enlisting into the Welsh Regiment and served with the 10th Welsh before transferring to the Hampshire Regiment, serving in Salonika with one of their service battalions. Thomas returned home to Amroth after the war and died on 6 October 1945.

 

William Carroll, Private, 15046, South Wales Borderers. William was born in Amroth in 1888, the son of John and Sarah Carroll. He worked as a colliery labourer and lodged at Glen View, Amroth prior to the war. William enlisted into the 7th Battalion, South Wales Borderers and saw service with the battalion in France, landing on 5 September 1915 with 67 Brigade, 22nd Division. Within months the division was transferred to Salonika and William served there until the Armistice and was discharged on 7 March 1919.

 

Gilbert Winifred Cole, Gunner, 146695, Royal Garrison Artillery. Gilbert was born in Amroth on 7 September 1899, the son of Thomas and Margaret Cole, of Wood Cottage. He served in France and Belgium with the 306th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery and after the Armistice returned to Amroth, where he married Florence Howells in 1919. He died in 1987.

 

William Horace Collingwood, Private, 201898, Welsh Regiment. William was born in Reading on 24 May 1896, the son of Frederick and Minnie Lavinia Collingwood. He lived at Corner House, Amroth prior to the war. He enlisted into the 1st/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, but after arriving in Egypt was posted to the 8th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to the 13th Division in Mesopotamia.  He returned to Amroth after the war and married Mary Elizabeth Phillips and the couple set up home at York House, Llanteg. William died on 12 July 1962 and is buried in St. Elidyr Churchyard, Crunwere. William is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Albert Harley Davies, Gunner, 371385, Royal Garrison Artillery. Albert was born on 29 May 1894, the son of James and Mary Emily Davies, of Amroth Mills, Stepaside. He enlisted into the Pembroke Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery and was posted to France with the 114th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery in 1916, seeing action in France and Belgium. He returned to Amroth after the war and married Martha Callen in 1924. Albert died on 28 May 1958.

 

John Thomas Davies, Gunner, 161165, Royal Garrison Artillery. John was born on 13 June 1892, the son of John and Mary Davies, of the New Inn. He enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery and saw service on the Western Front. Little else is presently known of him but he possibly died in 1963.

 

Richard James Davies, Private, 20268, Welsh Regiment. Richard was born on 29 December 1890, the son of John and Mary Davies, of the New Inn and worked as a gardener at Amroth Castle. He enlisted locally into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals battalion and trained with the battalion in Rhyl and Winchester before it embarked for France as part of the 38th (Welsh) Division on 2 December 1915. Richard served with the battalion throughout the entire war, seeing service at Mametz Wood and Pilckem Ridge and also in the divisions advance to victory in 1918. He died at Star House, Pendine on 20 August 1961.

 

Wilfred Arthur Davies, Private, 13930, Welsh Regiment. Wilfred was born on 6 October 1892, the son of James and Mary Emily Davies, of Amroth Mills, Stepaside. He enlisted into the 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division and saw service with the division in France and Salonika. Wilfred was discharged from the army as unfit om 8 September 1918 after having served overseas for three years. He returned to Amroth and married Frances Margaret Phillips in 1920. He later ran his own cobblers shop at Leeds House, Whitland before his death on 16 September 1960.

 

Osborne George Evans, Gunner, 155921, Royal Garrison Artillery. Osborne was born on 5 March 1896, the son of William and Martha Evans, of Camomile Back, Stepaside. He was a blacksmith’s apprentice when he enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery on 22 February 1916 and remained on the army reserve until being called up on 29 April 1917. On 29 July 1917 he embarked for France, joining the 188th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery and served in France for the remainder of the war, after being transferred to the 381st Battery. He was demobilised on 7 November 1919 before returning to Amroth and married Winifred Virginia Lily Narbett in 1923. He later worked as a water engineer for the council and died in 1985.

 

Alfred Thomas Griffiths, Private, 5505, Royal Army Medical Corps. Alfred lived at Longstone, Stepaside. He served in Egypt with the Royal Army Medical Corps, based at the School of Instruction, Zeitoun. Alfred is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Isaac Herbert Griffiths, Private, 241817, Welsh Regiment. Isaac was born in Amroth on 4 November 1888, the son of William and Frances Griffiths, of Sunnyhill. He enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and was posted to the Middle East at some time in 1917, after marrying Charlotte Morris in Swansea in 1916. Isaac served in Egypt and Palestine with the battalion, and remained with in Egypt with the later renamed 4th/5th Welsh until being demobilised after the war. He returned to Swansea and his wife Charlotte and died there in 1942.

 

John Clifford Griffiths, Gunner, 79410, Royal Garrison Artillery. John was born in 1897, the son of William and Frances Griffiths, of Sunnyhill. He enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery at Pembroke Dock on 19 March 1916 and on 3 September 1916 embarked for France joining the 256th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. John served in France for the remainder of the war and was demobilised on 2 March 1919, returning home to Sunnyhill. Little else is presently known of him.

 

Philemon Thomas Griffiths, Gunner, 194002, Royal Field Artillery. Philemon was born on 9 June 1894, the son of William and Frances Griffiths, of Sunnyhill. He was working as a Tailor at Glyncorrwg when he enlisted into the Royal Field Artillery and served during the war on home service, with E Battery. Philemon joined his elder brother Isaac in Swansea following demobilisation and married Mary George there in 1925. He died at Swansea on 18 December 1960.

 

Charles Hale, Stoker 1st Class, 297867, Royal Navy. Charles was born in Amroth on 18 May 1884, the son of Edmund and Susannah Hale, of Pwllygripping. He left Amroth as a young man to enlist into the Royal Navy on 20 July 1901 and trained at HMS Vivid II before beginning his career at sea. Over the coming years Charles served aboard a number of ships, including HMS Victorious, Implacable, Venerable and the armoured cruiser HMS Monmouth and by 1911 was served at HMS Warrior. Charles spent the war on postings in the North Sea and by 1918 was serving at HMS Benbow. Following his discharge from the Royal Navy he returned to Pembrokeshire and married Elizabeth Davies in 1928. He died in 1948.

 

Arthur Hodge, Private, 204570, Middlesex Regiment. Arthur was born on 2 June 1891, the son of Griffith and Esther Hodge, of 3, Beach Cottages, Amroth. He married Geraldine Davies at Swansea on 8 December 1915 and a month later she gave birth to their daughter, Clarice. Arthur worked as a ploughman at Scar Farm, Saundersfoot prior to enlisting on 5 May 1916 into the 2nd/7th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment and in 1917 was posted to the 23rd Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, seeing service in Italy and France. He was wounded on 23 March 1918, during the German Spring Offensive and after recovering was posted to the Labour Corps. He died at Horsemanstone, Amroth on 19 January 1963 and is buried in St. Elidyr Churchyard, Crunwere.

 

Francis Lawrence Hughes, Artificer, 2439, Royal Garrison Artillery. Francis was born in Aberystwyth in 1886, the son of David and Mary Esther Hughes. By 1911 his father had passed away and the family had moved to Blackhall, Amroth. He worked as an estate agent prior to enlisting into the Royal Garrison Artillery on 4 February 1916 and trained at the Ordnance College, Woolwich as a fitter before embarking for France with 337 Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery on 29 May 1917. He served in France and Belgium during his time at war and was posted to Dover Fire Command following the Armistice. Francis was demobilised on 21 August 1919 and returned to Amroth, where he died on 24 December 1959.

 

Frederick John Hughes, Regimental Sergeant Major, 432106, Canadian Infantry. Frederick was born at Amroth on 25 August 1894, the son of James and Mary Ann Hughes. By 1901 the family was living at Ystradfodwg and Frederick was educated there before gaining work as a coal hewer. He enlisted into the Royal Navy on 18 September 1912 but bought his discharge soon after and migrated to Canada prior to the war. He enlisted at Edmonton on 4 January 1915 into the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Frederick embarked for England with the 49th Battalion, CEF before embarking for France. He spent three months at the front before being invalided to England after being diagnosed as suffering from typhoid. Upon returing to his battalion he swiftly gained promotion to Regimental Sergeant Major, and after the Armistice returned to Canada, where he was discharged on 21 December 1918. Frederick returned to Amroth in 1952 and died there in 1966. Frederick is not named on the roll of honour.

 

John Wilfred Hughes, Private, 395, Pembroke Yeomanry. John was born in Amroth on 2 July 1890, the son of William and Esther Elizabeth Hughes. He married Sarah James in 1915 and the couple took up residence at Redberth Court where John worked as a farmer. He enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry on 17 April 1908 and served with the Yeomanry continually until being discharged on 28 February 1916, after having remained on home service. John is not named on the roll.

 

John Irving, Gunner, 128, Royal Field Artillery. John was born in Amroth in 1872, the son of James and Ann Irving. He left Amroth in 1891 to work in Cardiff and the following year married Margaret Ann Bowes. John enlisted into the Royal Field Artillery in 1908 but had left by 1911 and was living in Cardiff with his family. He re-enlisted after the outbreak of war and served until being discharged in 1919. He died in Cardiff in 1956. John is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Richard John Isaacs, Lance Corporal, Royal Marine Engineers. Richard was born at Amroth on 16 June 1974, the son of William and Mary Isaacs. He married Edith Minnie James in 1902 and the couple lived in 1, Beach Cottages, Amroth. Richard served during the war on home service with the Royal Marine Engineers. He resumed work as a mason after the war and died on 14 May 1946.

 

Bertie Morris James, Private, 76032, Welsh Regiment. Bertie was born on 15 October 1899, the son of William and Elizabeth James, of Cliff House, Amroth. He lived at Cabin Farm, Amroth prior to the war and served at home with the 4th (Reserve) Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He married Sarah Davies in 1924 and the couple set up home at Red Roses prior to the Second World War. He died in Weston-Super-Mare in 1972. Bertie is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Cecil Howell David James, Gunner, 83454, Royal Garrison Artillery. Cecil was born in Amroth in 1885, the son of Evan and Elizabeth James. He lived at Summer Brook, Stepaside prior to enlisting into the Royal Garrison Artillery and served in France with the 147th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Following the war Cecil returned home and lived in Summer Brook, until his death on 29 October 1931 and is buried in St. Elidyr Churchyard, Crunwere. Cecil is not named on the roll of honour.

 

David James, Sapper, 160265, Royal Engineers. David enlisted into the Royal Engineers on 10 April 1916 and served in Salonika and Macedonia with the British Salonika Force and was discharged from the army on 22 October 1919 due to sickness. Little else is known of David, except that he resided at 5, Beach Cottages, Amroth.

 

Frank James, Private, 17736, South Wales Borderers. Frank was born at Kiffig on 19 June 1894, the son of Benjamin and Margaret James. He served with the 8th Battalion, South Wales Borderers during the war and after the Armistice returned home, living at The Cabin, Amroth. Frank married Esther Ann Harries in 1919 and died on 28 April 1949. Frank is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Herbert Stanley James, Airman 2nd Class, 41046, Royal Air Force. Herbert was born in Amroth on 3 January 1888, the son of Benjamin and Sarah James of Highland Place. He served during the war on home service with the 26th Wing, Royal Air Force. After the Armistice Herbert returned to Amroth and married Ruth Allen in 1920 and the couple lived at Hill House. Herbert died on 27 January 1960.

 

Ivor David James, Private, 307154, Lancashire Fusiliers. Ivor was born in 1897, the son of William and Elizabeth James, of Cliff House, Amroth. He worked as a cowboy at Trenewydd, Crunwere prior to enlisting into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 9 December 1915. He served in France and Belgium with the 2nd/8th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers during the war and after demobilisation lived in 4, Beach Cottage. Ivor appears to have died in Southport in 1979.

 

James William James, Lance Corporal, 74786, Machine Gun Corps. James was the son of Robert and Louisa James, of Cliff Cottage, Stepaside. He enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry on 1 March 1914 and trained in Norfolk with the Yeomanry before embarking with the regiment for Egypt early in 1916. He transferred to the Machine Gun Corps soon afterwards and became attached to the 210th Company, which formed early in 1917 attached to the 74th (Yeomanry) Division, taking part in the campaigns in Egypt and Palestine, before it was moved to France in May 1918. James saw further action in France and Belgium before the war drew to a close. He was demobilised on 29 July 1919.

 

John Ernest James, Private, 242611, Leicester Regiment. John was born in Amroth in 1886, the son of William and Elizabeth James, of Cliff House, Amroth. He served in France and Belgium during the war with the 1st/5th Battalion, Leicester Regiment. John returned home to Beach Cottage after the Armistice and married Amelia Phillips in 1924. Nothing more is presently known of him.

 

Richard Ewart James, Private, 130662, Training Reserve. Richard was born in Narberth on 13 December 1898, the son of William and Elizabeth James. He lived at The Glen, Amroth prior to enlisting into the army and was posted to the 86th Battalion, Training Reserve. He survived the war, and married Hilda Stephens in 1927. Richard died on 7 December 1955. He is not named on the roll of honour. His brother, Hector Wilmot James, was killed in France on 8 May 1915.

 

Robert Philip James, Gunner, 146709, Royal Garrison Artillery. Robert was born on 28 July 1894, the son of Robert and Louisa James, of Cliff Cottage, Amroth. He served in France and Belgium during the war with the 306th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery and after the Armistice returned home to Cliff Cottage. Robert married Mary Howells in 1925 and died in 1972.

 

Thomas James, Shoeing Smith, 147999, Royal Garrison Artillery. Thomas was born in Amroth in about 1885, the illegitimate son of Fanny James. He lived with his uncle and aunt, William and Jane Beynon, at The Leys, Amroth and worked as a local blacksmith. He had served with the Pembroke Yeomanry for over two years prior to the outbreak of war before transferring to the Royal Garrison Artillery and served in France and Salonika with the 185th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. He remained in the colours with the Territorial Army after the war and married Gwendoline Davies at Amroth on 11 January 1923. Thomas died in 1970.

 

Henry Thomas James, Private, 22999, Welsh Regiment. Henry was born on 23 March 1895, the son of William and Elizabeth James, of Cliff House, Amroth. He lived in Pembroke Dock prior to the war, working as a labourer and enlisted there on 9 January 1915 into the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. On 15 April 1915 he was drafted to the Base Depot in France and was posted to the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. Henry took part in heavy fighting during his first months in France and was among a large number of men of the 2nd Welsh who were captured by the Germans during the Battle of Loos on 26 September 1915. He was interned at Soltau until being released on 29 December 1918 and returned home to 2, Beach Cottage, Amroth. He died in 1971.

 

Alfred George John, Gunner, 371268, Royal Garrison Artillery. Alfred was born in Amroth on 13 April 1898, the son of William and Elizabeth John, of Staggers Hill. He enlisted into the Pembrokeshire Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery and served in France with the 296th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Alfred returned to Amroth after the Armistice and married Sarah Alice Watts in 1920. He died on 25 September 1954. His brother, William David John, was killed in action on 14 March 1917.

 

James John, Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. James was the son of John and Susan John, of Sunnybank, Amroth. He trained as a Blacksmith prior to the war, before enlisting into the Pembroke Yeomanry. James was later transferred into the Army Service Corps and served as a Farrier Sergeant with the service number T4/232862, before being commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps, which was merged with the Royal Naval Air Service to form the Royal Air Force in March 1918. James saw service in Egypt and Palestine during his time at war.

 

Charles John, Private, 285321, Welsh Regiment. Charles was born on 8 February 1896, the son of John and Susan John, of Sunnybank, Amroth. He enlisted into the Welsh Regiment on 17 February 1916 and was posted to the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th Division before seeing service in France and Belgium. Charles returned to Amroth after the Armistice and married Mary Ann Morris in 1928. He died in 1972.

 

Ewart Rees Lawrence, Ordinary Seaman, J.64840, Royal Navy. Ewart was born on 11 July 1898, the son of George and Jane Lawrence, of Great Merrixton, Stepaside. He enlisted into the Royal Navy on 6 January 1917 and trained at HMS Vivid I before being posted aboard the R-class destroyer HMS Sceptre. Ewart saw service in the North Sea and was aboard Sceptre when she shot down a Zeppelin on 17 July 1917. He survived the war and returned to Amroth following demobilisation on 8 January 1919. He later emigrated to America and married Anna Elizabeth Linebaugh on 15 March 1941. He died in Oregon on 5 June 1985.

 

Albert Leonard, Private, 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Albert was born in Briton Ferry in 1867, the son of John and Mary Leonard. His parents were from Pembrokeshire and moved their young family back to Tenby by 1879. Albert married Esther Wilkins, of Amroth, after having completed 12 years service with the South Wales Borderers. He re-enlisted into the army on 6 August 1917, but due to his age was posted to the Army Service Corps. He only served for four months before being discharged due to his age and returned to Amroth, where he died in 1934. The roll of honour shows E. Leonard.

 

Albert George Lewis, Stoker 1st Class, K52009, Royal Navy. Albert was born at Stepaside on 27 April 1896, the son of Philip and Florence Lewis, of Oak Tree Cottage. He enlisted into the Royal Navy on 10 May 1918 and trained at HMS Vivid II before being posted aboard HMS Valiant. He was demobilised on 8 July 1919 and returned to Stepaside, marrying Elizabeth Annie Callan, of Amroth, in 1938. The couple ran the Prince of Wales in Stepaside until Albert’s death on 25 February 1963. Albert is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Bertie Howells Lewis, Gunner, 371267, Royal Garrison Artillery. Bertie was the son of Benjamin and Matilda Jane Lewis, of Brook Cottage, Stepaside. He enlisted into the Pembrokeshire Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery and was posted to France with a Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery. He returned to Amroth following demobilisation and married Sarah Davies in 1927. Bertie died in 1953.

 

Cecil Clifford Lewis, Private, 54748, Manchester Regiment. Cecil was born on 27 December 1898, the son of Benjamin and Matilda Jane Lewis, of Brook Cottage, Stepaside. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the army on 26 February 1917 and was posted to the 51st Training Battalion. On 1 November 1917 he was transferred to the 52nd (Graduated) Battalion, Manchester Regiment and on 18 January 1918 embarked for France, joining the 12th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. Cecil was wounded in the stomach during the great offensive on 9 September 1918 and evacuated from Rouen to England for treatment. He was demobilised on 16 January 1919 and returned to Amroth. He then moved to Merthyr to find work and married Elizabeth Ann Rees there in 1925. He died in Merthyr in 1958.

 

David Lewis, Private, 13929, Welsh Regiment. David was born on 9 June 1894, the son of John and Betsy Lewis, of Penglyn, Amroth. He worked as a butcher prior to enlisting into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment and landed in France with the battalion on 18 July 1915. The battalion served throughout the war with 58 Brigade, 19th Division and took part in some of the fiercest actions of the war. David survived the conflict and was demobilised on 18 February 1919. He returned home to Amroth and married Mary Ann Williams in 1919. He died in 1965.

 

Thomas Lewis, Lance Corporal, 15138, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was born in 1892, the son of John and Betsy Lewis, of Penglyn, Amroth. He worked as a blacksmith at Ammanford prior to enlisting into the 7th Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was attached to 67 Brigade, 22nd Division and embarked for France on 5 September 1915. Within a month the entire division was moved to Salonika, where it remained for the duration of the war. Thomas was demobilised on 7 March 1919. Nothing more is presently known of him.

 

Vernon Thomas Lewis, Aircraftsman, 182691, Royal Air Force. Vernon was born in Amroth on 27 September 1899, the son of Albert and Alice Margaret Lewis. The family had moved to Goodwick by 1911. Vernon enlisted into the Royal Air Force on 3 September 1918 and served at home until after the Armistice. He returned to Wales and married Dorothy Lewis at Neath in 1927 before returning to Goodwick, where Vernon found work as a lifeboat mechanic. He died on 27 March 1979. Vernon is not named on the roll of honour.

 

William Benjamin Lewis, Private, 5206, Welsh Guards. William was born on 15 January 1895, the son of Benjamin and Matilda Jane Lewis, of Brook Cottage, Stepaside. He enlisted into the Welsh Guards on 3 January 1916 and was posted to the depot at Caterham. William did not serve overseas, as he was found to have a heart murmur and a bout of scarlet fever curtailed his military service. He was discharged from the army on 5 January 1919 and returned home to Stepaside, marrying Sarah Williams in 1934. He died at Bridgend House, Stepaside in 1940. William is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Ambrose Morgan, Deck Hand, 61579DZ, Royal Naval Reserve. Ambrose was born on 11 August 1893, the son of William and Emily Morgan, of Cwms Hills, Stepaside. He worked as a colliery fireman prior to enlisting into the Royal Navy on 3 November 1916 and trained at HMS Vivid II before being transferred to the Royal Naval Reserve and served at HMS Idaho, the shore base at Milford Haven. He married Florence John in 1918, just before being demobilised and returned to Stepaside before gaining work with the GWR at Whitland. He died in 1961. Ambrose is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Heber John Morris, Sergeant, 320003, Welsh Regiment. Heber was born on 10 October 1877, the son of George and Mary Morris, of Amroth. He married Mary Maria Thomas in 1902 and the couple lived at Sea View, Amroth. He enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry and trained in Norfolk with the regiment before embarking for Egypt in 1916. During March 1917 the regiment merged with the Glamorgan Yeomanry to form the 24th battalion, Welsh Regiment, which became attached to the 74th (Yeomanry) Division and took part in the offensive into Palestine and the liberation of Jerusalem. In May 1918 the division was moved to France and took part in the great 100 days offensive which ended the war. After being demobilised Heber returned to Amroth and died in 1947.

 

Ernest Sidney Narbett, Gunner, 83453, Royal Garrison Artillery. Ernest was born on 30 April 1897, the son of James and Alice Narbett, of Kilgetty House, Stepaside. He enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery and served with the 268th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery in France during the war. After demobilisation, he became a signalman for the GWR at Burry Port and married Doris Davies in 1929. He died on 11 October 1988.

 

William Evan Narbett, Private, 201975, Welsh Regiment. William was born on 13 October 1892, the son of James and Alice Narbett, of Kilgetty House, Stepaside. He enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, but after being posted to Egypt, was transferred to the 8th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was in Mesopotamia. He served throughout the campaign there before being transferred to the Military Foot Police and after demobilisation became a blacksmith at Llangunnor. In 1921 he married Rachel Owens, whose brother, Thomas Owens, had been killed in France on 28 February 1917. He died in Llangunnor on 22 February 1978.

 

Henry Nicholas, Corporal, 28411, King’s (Liverpool) Regiment. Henry lived at Beach Cottage, Amroth. He enlisted into the King’s (Liverpool) Regiment and was posted to Egypt on 10 October 1915 with the 1st (Garrison) Battalion, King's (Liverpool) Regiment. Little else is presently known of him. Henry is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Arthur Bernard Joshua Peele, Private, 443157, Canadian Infantry. Arthur was born at Shrewsbury on 24 October 1876, the son of Arthur and Evelyn Peel. He joined the Mercantile Marine and became a second mate prior to migrating to Canada around the turn of the century. On 28 October 1915 he enlisted into the 54th Battalion, Canadian Infantry, giving his mother Evelyn as next of kin and her address as Rose Villa, Amroth. He arrived in England on 1 December 1915 and on 14 August 1916 embarked for France. He spent just three months at the front before being invalided home and was discharged from the CEF on 27 August 1919 after spending the remainder of the war on home service. By 1939 he was living with his young wife, Martha Peel, at Shrewsbury, where he worked as a gardener and he died at Shrewsbury on 16 March 1949.

 

John Phelps, Aircraftsman II, 266362, Royal Air Force. John was born at Amroth on 7 October 1873, the son of Thomas and Bridget Phelps. He enlisted into the Royal Air Force on 8 July 1918, two years after the death of a younger brother, Peter Thomas Phelps, in Egypt. John served at home and was discharged from the RAF after the Armistice. He possibly died in Llanelli in 1937.

 

Reginald Luther Phelps, Airman I, 8987, Royal Air Force. Reginald was born at Amroth on 2 March 1895, the son of Luther and Annie Phelps, of Bay View. He enlisted into the Royal Flying Corps on 24 September 1915 and served for the duration of the war. He married Alice Miriam Priest at Reading in 1920 and continued to serve with the Royal Air Force for many years afterwards, through World War Two. He died in Southampton in 1972. Reginald is not named on the roll of honour.

 

W. Phelps, Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. Gunner Phelps served at home. Presently he cannot be identified.

 

William Edgar Phelps, Private, Welsh Regiment. William was born in Cardiff on 17 June 1891, the son of Thomas and Bridget Phelps. By 1894 the family had moved to Amroth taking over Trelessy Farm, and William worked for his father. One of his brothers, Peter Thomas Phelps, was killed in Egypt on 22 June 1916 and at some time after this William enlisted into the Welsh Regiment. He served on home service before being demobilised and after returning home married Blodwen Thomas, of Longridge Farm, Laugharne in 1926. By 1939 William was working at Great Newton, Laugharne. William and Blodwen divorced at some time after and in 1947 William married Ethel Mary Cooper, of Cross Inn. William died on 20 March 1971 and is buried in Llanddowror Churchyard.

 

Albert George Phillips, Private, 202727, Welsh Regiment. Albert was born on 21 July 1893, the son of John and Elizabeth Phillips, of Corner, Amroth. He worked at Tremoilet Farm prior to the war when he enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Albert was posted to France, probably in 1917, joining the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th Division and took part in the final year of the war in France, culminating in the great 100 days offensive. He returned to Amroth after the Armistice and married Mary Thomas in 1901. He farmed at Woodside, Amroth until his death in 1970.

 

David Phillips, Gunner, 371370, 114 Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. David was born on 23 September 1885, the son of John and Elizabeth Phillips, of Corner, Amroth. He enlisted into the Pembrokeshire Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery on 7 September 1915 and posted to France with 114 Siege Battery on 14 June 1916. David was badly wounded in the thigh in May 1917 whilst serving in France, supporting the Arras offensive and had his left leg amputated. He was discharged from the RGA on 25 September 1918 and awarded a pension. He died in 1969.

 

Harold Graham Phillips, Private, 178104, 87th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. Harold was born in Amroth on 10 November 1883, the son of Alfred Thomas Phillips and Julia Anna Phillips. The family later lived at Swansea, where Harold joined the Mercantile Marine, before marrying Jennet Bowen in 1910. The couple then migrated to Canada, where Harold enlisted into the Canadian Expeditionary Force on 13 December 1915. He arrived in England in May 1916 but only saw service at home before being discharged in July, when he re-joined the Mercantile Marine. Harold died in Swansea on 4 January 1953. Harold is not named on the roll.

 

Thomas Phillips, Sapper, 285334, Royal Engineers. Thomas was born in about 1880, the son of John and Elizabeth Phillips, of Corner House, Amroth. He served during the war with the Tyne Garrison Fortress Company, Royal Engineers, on home service. Nothing more is currently known of him.

 

William Phillips, Driver, 117402, Royal Field Artillery. William was born in 1892, the son of John and Elizabeth Phillips, of Corner, House, Amroth. He worked as a teamster prior to the war and enlisted at Whitland into the Royal Field Artillery on 11 December 1915, joining their 8th Reserve Battery. On 6 September 1916 William was posted to France, joining the 8th Division Ammunition Column and served with the unit in France until after the Armistice. He was discharged on 31 March 1920 after over four years service and returned home to Amroth. Little else is known of him, but he possibly died in 1923.

 

Ivor Prout, Seaman, K52115, Royal Navy. Ivor was born at Amroth on 26 November 1897, the son of Osmond and Elizabeth Prout. He enlisted into the Royal Navy on 13 May 1918 and after training at HMS Vivid II was posted aboard HMS Colleen. On 4 June 1919 Ivor was demobilised and returned to Pembrokeshire, marrying Hilda Priscilla Collins in 1920. He died on 5 August 1946. Ivor is not named on the roll of honour.

 

William Thomas Prout, Airman 3rd Class, 130168, Royal Air Force. William was born on 20 February 1899, the son of Stephen and Esther Prout, of Summer Hill, Amroth. He enlisted into the Royal Flying Corps on 19 March 1917 and was posted to No. 1 Wireless Section, in Italy. He remained with the Royal Air Force following its formation in March 1918 and after demobilisation returned to Amroth. William married Elsie Mary Edney at Cardiff in 1920 and died in Cardiff in 1972.

 

Charles Stephen Richards, Private, South Wales Borderers. Charles was born on 22 June 1898, the son of Benjamin and Emma Jane Richards, of Staggers Hill, Stepaside. He served in Germany with the Army of Occupation after the war. After being demobilised, Charles worked as a quarryman and died on 14 September 1955.

 

William Richards, Private, 187266, Training Reserve. William was the son of William and Margaret Richards, of The Prince of Wales Inn, Stepaside. He enlisted into the army on 4 May 1918 and was posted to the 116th Battalion, Training Reserve and after training was posted to the 4th Reserve Battalion, Machine Gun Corps at Rugeley. William does not appear to have served overseas, although the roll of honour states that he served in France. He was demobilised on 9 January 1919 and returned to Amroth. Little else is currently known of him.

 

William Tudor Richards, Sapper, 34479, Royal Engineers. William was born on 28 November 1890, the son of William and Martha Richards. He married Clara Phillips in 1912 and the couple lived at Glen View, Amroth. William served with the 136th Army Troops Company, Royal Engineers on home service during the war. He returned home to Amroth after the Armistice and died in 1941.

 

John Scourfield, Lance Corporal, 7195, Military Foot Police. John was born on 11 October 1880, the son of George and Susan Scourfield, of Griggs, Amroth. He enlisted into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 1 February 1915 following a recruitment drive by the battalion around west Wales. John joined the battalion at Rhyl where it was carrying out its basic training before moving to Winchester as part of the 38th (Welsh) Division. He embarked for France with the battalion on 2 December 1915 and took part in the divisions famous assault on Mametz Wood on 10 July 1916, where John was shot in the head. He was brought back to England for treatment and upon recovery was transferred to the Military Foot Police, spending the rest of the war as an MP. John had married Sarah Jane Phillips whilst on leave on 17 April 1916 and returned home to her following demobilisation on 3 February 1919. He died in 1971. John is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Edward Seymour Smith, Airman, 78282, Royal Air Force. Edward was born in London in 1897, the son of Frederick and Adelaide Smith. He lived in Osborne Villa, Amroth prior to the war. Edward enlisted into the Royal Flying Corps on 3 December 1915 and served with No. 5 Balloon Section in France and Belgium. He remained with what became the Royal Air Force until after the Armistice and at some time afterwards returned to London, marrying Elsie Annie Howell there on 7 January 1928.

 

William Thomas Stolze Smith, Private, 694, Australian Expeditionary Force. William was born in 1888, the son of Michael and Mary Smith, of Thornend, Amroth. He migrated to Australia with his brother Herbert prior to the war and enlisted at Helena Vale on 15 October 1914 into the 16th Battalion, Australian Infantry. The battalion embarked for overseas on Boxing Day and arrived in Egypt in February 1915 to become part of the 4th Brigade, 4th Australian Division. William landed at Anzac Cove, Gallipoli with the battalion and saw heavy fighting over the coming days. He was wounded on 21 May and evacuated to hospital in Lemnos. After recovering from his wounds he was posted to the base at Tel-el-Kebir but became ill and was diagnosed as suffering from heart disease. He returned to Australia on 5 July 1916 and was discharged from the AIF upon his return. He later migrated to Pennsylvania, where he died on 27 August 1948.

 

Alfred Philemon Thomas, Sergeant, 130th US Infantry. Alfred was born on 3 January 1888, the son of Thomas and Jane Thomas, of Greenplains, Stepaside. He emigrated to America prior to the war and enlisted in Cook County, Illinois into the 130th US Infantry on 5 June 1917. Alfred served in France with the Regiment, seeing action in the Meuse-Argonne sector. Alfred returned to Amroth after the war and married Gertrude Elizabeth Allen, the sister of my great grandfather Thomas Allen, in 1919. The couple then migrated to America and settled at Muscatine, Iowa, where Gertrude died in 1930. Alfred remarried after her death and died in Muscatine on 17 June 1959. He is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Muscatine.

 

J. Thomas, Driver, Army Service Corps. Driver Thomas served at Home with the Army Service Corps. Nothing further is currently known of him.

 

Ronald Charles Thomas, Private, 22230, Army Catering Corps. Ronald was born on 6 November 1889, the son of Edward and Letitia Ann Thomas, of Rose Cottage, Stepaside. He served throughout the war on home service, attached to the Army Catering Corps. Ronald returned to Amroth after the war and married Mabel Dalton in 1924. The couple ran the Post Office at Stepaside until retiring and moved to Lees, Staffordshire, where Ronald died on 11 March 1961.

 

Thomas Thomas, Rifleman, 307571, Hampshire Regiment. Thomas lived at The Square, Stepaside. He enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment and was posted to the 1st/7th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment, which was attached to the Hampshire Brigade, Wessex Division. Thomas served with the battalion on garrison duties in India and Aden during the war, but nothing further is known of him. He is not named on the roll of honour.

 

John James Vaughan, Shipbuilder, Royal Naval Dockyard. John was born in 1885, the son of George and Ellen Vaughan, of 43, Lewis Street, Pembroke Dock. He married Eliza Tainton Evans in 1911 and the couple lived at Roslyn Hill, Stepaside. John worked as a Shipbuilder in the Royal Naval Dockyard at Pembroke Dock. He survived his wife and died on 2 January 1950. John is not named on the roll of honour.

 

Harold Waters, Gunner, 15433, Royal Garrison Artillery. Harold was born on 20 February 1897, the son of John and Nacy Waters, of 2, Brook Cottage, Stepaside. He worked as a Colliery Teamster prior to enlisting into the Royal Garrison Artillery and served on home service with X Battery. After the war he returned to Amroth and married Annie Bridges in 1920. Harold died in 1977.

 

Joseph Webb, Driver, O727, Army Service Corps. Joseph lived at Woodside, Amroth. He served during the war as a Driver with the Army Service Corps. Nothing more is presently known of him. Joseph is not named on the roll of honour.

 

John Wilkins, Driver, 143115, Army Service Corps. John was born on 13 June 1888, the son of John and Ann Wilkins, of Skerry Back, Amroth. He worked as an agricultural labourer prior to the war when he enlisted into the Army Service Corps on 11 December 1915, and embarked for Salonika with their 798th Company on 24 July 1916. John returned to Amroth after the war, following a spell in hospital, and married Eveline May Irvine in 1920. He possibly died in 1950.

 

Thomas Wilkins, MM, Gunner, 371167, Royal Garrison Artillery. Thomas was born in 1881, the son of John and Ann Wilkins, of Skerry Back, Amroth. He had moved to the valleys prior to the war to gain work as a stoker and married Rose Margaret Harries in 1906. The couple lived in 5 Ton Row, Ton Pentre. Thomas served during the war with the 114th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, seeing service in France and Belgium and gaining the award of the Military Medal for Bravery in the Field. He returned to Ton Pentre after the war and died there in 1926.

 

Arthur Ebsworth Williams, Private, 108672, Machine Gun Corps. Arthur was born on 4 December 1886, the son of John and Martha Williams, of Truemans Park, Amroth. He served during the war with the 33rd Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, seeing action in Belgium. Arthur returned to Amroth after the war and died in 1957.

 

G. Williams, 3rd Airman, Royal Air Force. Airman Williams served in France with the Balloon Repair Section, Royal Air Force.

 

George Frederick Williams, Private, 129390, Machine Gun Corps. George was born on 7 August 1897, the son of George and Elizabeth Annie Williams, of Glan-y-Mor, Amroth. He served in France and Belgium with the 15th Battalion, London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles), and transferred to the 46th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, remaining with the battalion after the Armistice, as part of the Army of Occupation in Germany. He returned to Wales after demobilisation and married Irene Maud Thomas at Llanelli in 1921. He probably died in Llanelli in 1946.

 

George Thomas Williams, Private, 55, Pembroke Yeomanry. George was born in Amroth on 6 March 1884, the son of Thomas and Annie Williams. He later moved to West Tarr, Penally, where he farmed. George enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry on 26 April 1908 and served with the Yeomanry on home service before being discharged from the army on 18 February 1916. He died on 27 December 1945. George is not named on the roll of honour

 

James Williams, Gunner, 83552, Royal Field Artillery. James was born in Cwmdu, Glamorgan, in 1894. Prior to the war he had moved to Staggers Hill, Stepaside and worked as a coal miner. He enlisted at Maesteg into the Royal Field Artillery on 19 August 1914 and was posted to France. James was wounded in the left arm in 1915 and returned to Britain in August. He was posted back to the front after recovering and remained in France until after the Armistice. James returned to Stepaside after being demobilised on 1 February 1919, but his health had begun to deteriorate, so he went to live with a cousin at Bronwylfa, Treventy Terrace, Cross Hands, where he died on 18 May 1923. James is not named on the roll of honour.

 

John George Williams, Private, 46, Pembroke Yeomanry. John was born at Telpyn on 26 August 1883, the son of Thomas and Martha Williams. The family later moved to St. Florence and John married Rebecca Amelia Morris in 1909. He enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry on 13 April 1904 and served with the yeomanry until being discharged on 1 October 1915 after serving on home service. He died on 12 July 1940. John is not named on the roll of honour.

 

William Williams, Gunner, 146725, Royal Garrison Artillery. William was the son of James and Emma Williams, of The Croft, Amroth. He served throughout the war with the 322nd Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Nothing more is presently known of him.

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Website News

17 Oct 2018. Some great news again today after having received confirmation that another four Welsh servicemen have been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research: Samuel Brooks, of Swansea; David Humphreys, of Pontypool; David Jenkin Jones, of Llwydoed; and Tudor Emlyn Jones, of Swansea. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

16 Oct 2018. Have today received confirmation that another Welsh serviceman has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research: William Henry Lippitt, of Llanhilleth. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

12 Oct 2018. Some great news today that another two Welsh soldiers have been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research:  David Morgan Jenkins, of Swansea; and Jenkin Robert Lewis, of Llanelli. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

6 Mar 2018. Some more good news today that yet another Welsh soldier, Thomas David Rees, of Whitchurch, Cardiff, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

3 Mar 2018. Good news today that another Welsh soldier, Reginald Wilfred Collard, of Whitchurch, Cardiff, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

26 Feb 2018. The second volume of my latest book 'The Welsh at War' has been published today and is available from all good bookshops. Please see the Steve's Books page for details.

 

23 Feb 2018. Some good news today that another local man, Gwilym Bennett, of Llanelli, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

5 Feb 2018. The first volume of my latest book 'The Welsh at War' has been published today and is available from all good bookshops. Please see the Steve's Books page for details.

 

27 Jan 2018. Some good news again, that Thomas Arthur Edward Pugsley, of Ynysboeth, has recently been accepted by the CWGC for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

22 Jan 2018. I have received news that a sailor from Swansea, James Carne, who I had researched, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

1 December 2017. A new section has been added to the website, which will cover some war memorials in Glamorgan, more especially the memorials nearest to the county border with Carmarthenshire. More will be added as time allows.

 

4 November 2017. Some good news this week following the discovery, after much searching, of the grave of Private Thomas Davies, of Laugharne. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers page of the website for details.

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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