West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Rhoscrowther War Memorial

Rhoscrowther is a small village located just over five miles west of Pembroke, near the south shore of Milford Haven. The ancient church is dedicated to Saint Decuman, but had been locked up since an explosion at the nearby Texaco Refinery in 2011 which damaged its roof structure and forced the evacuation of the few remaining dwellings in the village. Inside the Church is a single war memorial to Frederick Thomas, of the Parish, who fell during World War One. Also on this page are details of all of the known men from the Parish who fell during both World Wars but who are not commemorated here.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

William James Evans, Gunner, 371314, Royal Garrison Artillery. William was born in Rhoscrowther in 1898, the son of David and Ellen Evans. The family later resided in 18, Nelson Street, Pennar Court, Pembroke, where William’s father worked in the Dockyard. William enlisted in Neyland into the Pembrokeshire Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery and was posted to France, joining the 185th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, which was equipped with the 9.2” Howitzer. William was killed in action just over two weeks before the Armistice, on 24 October 1918, aged 20. He is buried in Wassigny Communal Cemetery, France. There are a number of gunners there who were killed on the same date, suggesting a disaster to a gun crew.

Edmond Talbot Stanley, Major, Devonshire Regiment. Edmond was born at Rhoscrowther in 1858, the third son of Edmond Stanley, J.P. and Anne Stanley. He was educated at Victoria College, Jersey and joined the army in 1875, gaining a commission into the 11th Foot (Devonshire Regiment) before sailing for India. In 1884, he married Alice Mary Crocker, and the couple had three daughters. Edmond held positions around the Empire over the coming years and served during the Boer War of 1899-1902. He retired soon afterwards but rejoined the army at the outbreak of the Great War and served for the duration. By the end of the war he was second in command of the 11th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment and died at Rouen on 27 February 1919, aged 60. He is buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.

Frederick Thomas, Private, 27342, Welsh Regiment. Frederick was the son of James and Annie Thomas, of Upper Lodge, Castle Hall, Milford Haven. He enlisted at Pembroke into the Welsh Regiment, and was posted to France to join the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. The Division had been one of the first in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, before being moved north to Ypres. Here they fought at the First Battle of Ypres, where they again stopped the German Offensive, before wintering in Flanders. The following year saw them in action again at the Battle of Aubers, before moving South to Loos, where they fought during the Battle of Loos, and the action at the Hohenzollern redoubt. Frederick was wounded at Loos in March 1916, and sent to the Base Hospital at Rouen. He died there on 10 March 1916, aged 18, and is buried at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

World War Two, 1939-1945

 

Albert John Price, Gunner, 1119610, Royal Artillery. Albert was the son of Joseph and Esther Price and the husband of Winifred Price, of Rhoscrowther. He served with the 130th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was a Territorial unit, attached to the 36th Indian Division in India. Little is known of Albert but he died in Burma on 4 January 1943, aged 31, and is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial. The photograph is courtesy of Tony Beck.

DONATIONS. If you find this website of use, please think about donating to help cover the costs of the huge amount of work and the continual costs of keeping the website on-line. Donations can be made using the Paypal link below, or by contacting the author via the Contact page.

Website News

4 November 2017. Some good news this week following the discovery, after much searching, of the grave of Private Thomas Davies, of Laugharne. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers page of the website for details.

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

Get social with us.

Print Print | Sitemap
Copyright © 2003-2018 West Wales War Memorial Project