West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

Carmarthenshire Boer War Memorial

Carmarthenshire Boer War Memorial commemorates all of the men of the County who fell during the Anglo-Boer War of 1899 to 1902, and is located at Guildhall Square, Carmarthen. The Memorial takes the form of an Officer in uniform, proudly stood on top of a pillar, bearing granite panels that commemorate the men of the County of Carmarthenshire who died during the South African Boer War. For some years a captured Boer cannon was displayed in front of the memorial.

 

Carmarthen Boer War Memorial

TO THE

HONOURED MEMORY

OF HER SONS,

WHO DIED DURING

THE WAR IN

SOUTH AFRICA,

1899-1902,

CARMARTHENSHIRE

DEDICATES

THIS MEMORIAL

 

GWELL ANGAU NA GWARTH

 

W. ARTHUR, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


James S. BAGNALL GETHING, Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers.


H. BASKERVILLE, Sapper, Royal Engineers


F.J. BROWN, Lance Corporal, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers.


G. DAVIES, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


Joseph DAVIES, Corporal, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


T. DAVIES, Private, Royal Welsh Fusiliers


W. DAVIES, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


W.D. DAVIES, Sergeant, Brabants Horse


W.P. DAVIES, Private, Grenadier Guards


W.L. FITZWILLIAMS, Lance Corporal, V.A.S. Company A, Argylle and Sutherland Highlanders


H.G. HALL, Lance Corporal, Montgomeryshire Yeomanry


R. HOWELL, Corporal, Diamond Field Horse


T. HUGHES, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


W.J. JACOBS, Lance Corporal, Royal Welsh Fusiliers


W. JAMES, Private, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers.


W. JAMES, Trooper, Scot’s Sharpshooters


Dan JONES, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


George JONES, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


Jno JONES, Private, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers.


W.F. JONES, Plumer’s Column


F. LEWIS, Trooper, Wiltshire Yeomanry


W. MORGAN, Lance Corporal, Mounted Rifles


Thomas MORRIS, Lieutenant, The Carabiniers


T. OWENS, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


T. PARRY, Trooper, Middlesex Yeomanry


T.L. RICHARDS, Lance Corporal, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


I. SMEDLEY, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment


T. THOMAS, Private, Royal Welsh Fusiliers


J. WALES, Trooper, The Carabiniers


E.R. WEBB, Trooper, Gloucestershire Yeomanry


S. WILLIAMS, Trooper, Montgomeryshire Yeomanry


William Arthur Glanmor WILLIAMS, D.S.O., Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO)

 

More Details on the Men

 

William Arthur, Private, 8625, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. William was serving with the 1st Welsh when he became ill. He died in Hospital at Noupoort, on 18 June 1900, and is buried at Noupoort, Northern Cape.

 

James Stanley Bagnall-Gething, Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. James was the son of James Edwards Gething and Maria Llewellyn Bagnall, of 47, Lancaster Gate, London. He was educated at Harrow, and commissioned into the South Wales Borderers in January 1900, being promoted Lieutenant January 1901. James volunteered for service in South Africa and sailed there with his battalion in February 1900. He served continuously up to the time of his death, when on 3 July 1901, at Taungs, he died of injuries received through falling off his horse on the previous day. James is buried at Vryburg. His mother Maria was the daughter of James Bagnall, of Castle Hill House, Carmarthen. His younger brother Hugh Bagnall Gething was born at Llanddarog, and killed during the Great War.

 

Harry Baskerville, Sapper, 4678, Royal Engineers Telegraph Section. Harry was born in Devon in 1867, the son of Philip and Louisa Baskerville. The family had moved to Carmarthen prior to 1881, and Harry worked for the Electric Telegraph in the town. He embarked for South Africa with the Royal Engineers Telegraph section. Harry died of disease in hospital at Kaapsehoop on 5 May 1901, aged 33. He is buried at Kaapschehoop, Mpumalanga.

 

Francis John Brown, Lance Corporal, 1585, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Francis was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Brown, of Presteigne, Radnorshire. He had married Ann Elizabeth Jenkins in 1894, and the couple had lived at Llandovery. Francis was killed in action during the Battle of Karee Sidings on 29 March 1900, aged 31. He is buried at Karee, North West Province. The British lost 30 killed, 155 wounded and five missing in action that day, while the burghers lost three killed and 18 wounded.

 

Charles Davies, Private, 8866, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Of Abergwili. Killed in Action during the Welsh Regiment’s successful assault on the strongly defended Boer position at Driefontein on 10 March 1900. He is buried at Driefontein, Bosrand.

 

Charles Emlyn Davies, Private, 2393, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Charles was from Abergwili. He was killed at Nelspruit on 8 April 1901.

 

Joseph Davies, Corporal, 2109, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Joseph was born in 1869, the son of William and Jane Davies, of Heol Las, Five Roads. He had served with the army for several years prior to becoming a reservist, and returned to Five Roads, to work as a driver. Upon the outbreak of the Boer War in South Africa, Joseph was recalled to the colours, but married Dora Ann Lloyd, at Felinfoel prior to embarking with the 1st Battalion, Welch Regiment aboard the Kildonan Castle. The battalion arrived at the Cape by 22 November 1899, and was despatched to the Cape Colony. Joseph was killed in action during the Welsh Regiment’s successful assault on the strongly defended Boer position at Driefontein on 10 March 1900. He was 30 years old, and is buried at Driefontein, Bosrand. Joseph is also commemorated on the Llanelli Boer War Memorial, and will also be commemorated on the new Five Roads War Memorial.

 

Philip Davies, Private, 7565, 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Philip was the son of William and Eliza Davies, of Cwmbranfach, Llansadwrn. He was Killed in Action during the Battle of Belmont, on 23 November 1899, aged 26, and is buried at West End Cemetery, Kimberley, Northern Cape. Philip is also commemorated on the Llansadwrn War Memorial.

William Davies, Lance Corporal, 2901, 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Taken ill with Dysentery, and died in hospital at Woodstock, Cape Town on 28 April 1900. He is buried at Maitland, Cape Town.

 

William D. Davies, Private, 2nd Brabants Horse. William was from Llanelli. He died at Queenstown on 5 June 1902, a week after the Boer surrender was signed. He is buried at Queenstown, Eastern Cape.

 

William Logie Lloyd Fitzwilliams, Corporal, 7301, 1st Battalion, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders (Princess Louise's). William was born on 5 August 1879 at Llandyfriog, the son of Charles Home Lloyd Fitzwilliams and Margaret Alice Crawford. He died of enteric fever contracted in South Africa on the day he landed back in England, on 20 May 1901, aged 21. He is buried in Llandyfriog.

 

Henry George Hall, Private, 34678, 9th Battalion, 49th (Montgomeryshire) Imperial Yeomanry. Henry was born in Hatfield, Herefordshire in 1879, the son of Thomas and Ann Hall. The family had moved to Cilgwyn Lodge, Myddfai, Carmarthenshire at some time after 1891, where Thomas worked as a Gamekeeper. Henry served in South Africa with the Montgomeryshire Imperial Yeomanry. He died of disease at Springfontein on 2 February 1902, aged 23. He is buried at Springfontein, Free State.

 

Richard Howell, Corporal, 248, Diamond Fields Horse. Richard was from Felinfoel, and was the son of David and Margaret Howell, of the Hope and Anchor, Llanelli. He was among 19 men killed in action at Carters Ridge, Kimberley on 28 November 1899. He was 24 years old, and is buried at Kimberley, and commemorated on the Honoured Dead Memorial. Richard is also commemorated on the Felinfoel War Memorial and the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

Thomas Hughes, Private, 5598, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Tom was the son of John and Mary Hughes, and the grandson of Mr. Harvey, of the Angel Inn, Carmarthen. He was killed in action at Driefontein on 10 March 1900, aged 24. Tom is not commemorated on the County War Memorial, as he lived in Swansea.

 

William James Jacobs, Private, 5892, 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. William was the son of David and Elizabeth Jacobs, of Middleway Farm, Cyffig, Whitland. He died of enteric fever at Ladysmith on 28 April 1900, aged 17. He is buried at Thornhill, Ladysmith. His brother, Arthur George Jacobs, was killed in WW1.

 

Watkin James, Private, Scots Railway Sharpshooters. Watkin was the son of Thomas and Jane James, of Greenfield Place, Llandeilo. He had emigrated to South Africa in about 1897. He died at Vryburg Hospital on 25 January 1902 of wounds received in action. He is not commemorated on the County War Memorial.

 

William James, Private, 6161, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. William was the son of John and Elizabeth James, of Ddolddefod, Pencader. He died of enteric fever at Krugersdorp on 13 April 1901. He is buried at Krugersdorp, Gauteng.

 

William James, Private, 5670, 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. William died of enteric fever at Kimberley on 20 January 1901. He is buried at West End Cemetery, Kimberley.

 

Dan Jones, Private, 1241, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Dan had lived with his sister Maggie at Duke’s Yard, Priory Street, Carmarthen. He had served for six years in India, prior to embarking for South Africa with the 1st Welsh, and was at the relief of Kimberley, Driefontein and Paardeburg. Dan died of disease at Bloemfontein on 8 May 1900, aged 25. He is buried at Bloemfontein, Free State.

 

George Jones, Private, 6340, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. George was the son of Mrs Jones, of The Shop, Lammas Street, Carmarthen. He died of disease at Waterval Onder on 24 February 1901. He is buried at Waterval Onder, Mpumalanga.

 

John Jones, Private, 6633, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. John was from Llanelli. He was killed in action at during the Boer attack on Modderfontein on 2 February 1901. He is buried at Potchesfstroom, North West Province. John is also commemorated on the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

William Frederick Jones, Corporal, Rhodesia Regiment. William was born on 13 February 1870, the son of Reverend Thomas Jones, and Margaret Jones, of Drefach Velindre. He was educated at Llandovery College before emigrating to South Africa, where he joined the British South Africa Police at Buluwayo. At the outbreak of war he volunteered to serve with the Rhodesia Regiment, which was part of Plumer’s Column. The column was working its way to attempt to relieve the Siege of Mafeking, when William was wounded during an engagement with Boer’s at Gaberones Crocodile Pools. He died of his wounds on 13 February 1900, aged 30, and is buried at Gaberones, which is today located in Botswana. William is also commemorated on a fine memorial in St Barnabas Church, Drefach Velindre.

James Arthur Leonard, Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Arthur was son of James and Sarah Leonard, and the brother of William Frederick Leonard, of the Temperance Hotel, Llanelli. He had served in South Africa with the 1st Welsh, and had taken part in several engagements before becoming ill. He was sailing back to England when he died aboard ship of enteric fever on 24 May 1900, aged 19. The Leonard’s had sadly already lost two other children at a young age, Florence at two years old, and Albert at ten years. James is also commemorated on the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

 

Francis Lewis, Trooper, 24086, 1st Battalion, 1st (Wiltshire) Imperial Yeomanry. Frank was the son of John and Harriet Lewis, of Plasygraian, Bethlehem, Llandeilo. He died of enteric fever at Harrismith on 21 January 1901, aged 28. He was one of only three Wiltshire Yeomanry men to have died during the Boer War, all from disease.

 

William Ivor Morgan, Lance Corporal, Midland Mounted Rifles. William was the son of John and Ann Morgan, of Llansteffan. His father was the Head of the National School, but after his death in 1894, Ann had moved the family to Huddersfield. William emigrated to South Africa, and joined the Midland Mounted Rifles. He was killed in action near Waterkloof, Mortimer on 20 June 1901, aged 20, and is buried at Cradock, Eastern Cape. His brother John Herbert Morgan was killed on 21 February 1918 during the Great War.

 

Thomas Morris, Lieutenant, 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers). Thomas was born in May 1879, the only son of Thomas and Sarah Morris, of Coomb Mansion. He was educated at Cheltenham College. Thomas entered the 6th Dragoon Guards from the 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers in October 1899, and was promoted Lieutenant in May 1900. He embarked for South Africa soon after, where he took part in the advance on Johannesburg and Pretoria, and the subsequent engagements around Belfast and Machadadorp, and the advance to Barberton. On 26 January 1902, Thomas had been called on to surrender after a brief melee against a Boer force near Oshoek. On scornfully refusing, he was shot down dead, and was buried by the Boers in a farmyard at Oshoek, Transvaal. Thomas was just 22 years of age. He is also commemorated on the Eleanor Cross Memorial at Cheltenham College, and on several memorials at Llangynog, including his original grave marker, which is inside the church.

Tom Owens, Private, 5509, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Tom was from Llanelli. He was killed in action at Paardeberg Drift on 18 February 1900, during the retreat from Kimberley. He is buried at Vendusi Drift, Paardeberg. Tom is also commemorated on the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

 

Thomas Parry, Private, 33761, 11th Battalion, 34th (Middlesex) Imperial Yeomanry. Tom was the son of John and Margaret Parry, of Black Rock, Llanwrda. He had worked as a coachman for Mr Pryse-Rice at llwynybrain, before embarking for South Africa with the Imperial Yeomanry. He was killed in action during the Boer attack on Groenkop on 25 December 1901, aged 30. He is buried at Town Cemetery, Harrismith.

 

John Phillips, Private, 1630, 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers. John was the son of George Phillips, a Bootmaker, of Carmarthen. He had served at Colenso, and was wounded at Frederikstad on 25 October 1900. Period newspaper reports of his death proved to be incorrect, and John returned safely home at the end of the conflict. His younger brother Ishmael Phillips was killed at the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. John is obviously not commemorated on the County War Memorial.

 

Francis Frederick Lewes Schaw Protheroe, Sergeant Major, 4182, Imperial Yeomanry. Frank was the son of Edward Schaw Protheroe and of Ellen Augusta Cecilia Protheroe, of Dolwilym Mansion, near Whitland. He was a long serving soldier, and had fought in the Zulu War of 1877-1879. He died of enteric fever at Springfontein on 26 May 1901, aged 37. He is not commemorated on the Carmarthen County Boer War Memorial, but on the Pembrokeshire County Memorial.

 

Thomas Lloyd Richards, Private, 5666, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Daniel and Mary Richards, of Somerset House, Llandyssul. He had taken part in several actions in South Africa, before being killed in action near Elandshoek on 20 May 1901, aged 26. He is buried at Barberton, Gauteng Province.

 

Samuel Smedley, Private, 2664, 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Samuel was born in Derbyshire in 1871, and had moved to Llanelli with his brother George by 1891. Samuel was killed in action at Driefontein on 10 March 1900. He is buried at Bosrand, Driefontein. The Smedley family suffered more pain in the summer of 1900, when George’s twin girls, Gladys Pretoria and Sybil Mafeking Smedley were born, but sadly died within weeks of each other. Samuel is also commemorated on the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

 

Thomas Thomas, Private, 5729, 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was killed in action at Frederikstad on 25 October 1900. He is buried at Potchesfstroom, North West Province.

 

John Wales, Trooper, 3672, 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers). John was the son of David and Margaret Wales, of Pembrey. He was killed in action near Klipstapel on 23 April 1901, aged 31. He is buried at Ermelo, Mpumalanga. John is also commemorated on the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

 

Ernest Robert Webb, Trooper, 23361, 9th Battalion, 30th (Pembrokeshire Yeomanry) Company. Ernest lived at Great Western Terrace, Llanelli, and had served with the Yeomanry for several years prior to the war. He died of enteric fever at Harrismith on 29 May 1901, aged 21. He is buried at Harrismith Town Cemetery. Ernest is also commemorated on the Llanelli Boer War Memorial.

Ralph Paynter Williams, Farrier Sergeant 4138, 30th (Pembrokeshire) Company, 9th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry. Ralph was born at Pembroke on 13 December 1879, the son of Reverend David Edward Williams, and Mrs Rose Williams (nee Paynter), of Lampeter Velfrey. He was educated at Haileybury, Hertfordshire and Royal Veterinary College. He then joined the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, but at the outbreak of the Boer War, volunteered for service with the Pembroke Yeomanry. He was killed in action near Ventersburg while attempting to rescue an officer on 23 August 1900, aged 21, and is buried in Ventersburg Cemetery,Ventersburg. He is commemorated on a stained glass window and on a memorial at Lampeter Velfrey Church, but not on the Carmarthenshire County Memorial.

S. Williams, Shoeing Smith, 9th Battalion, 88th (Welsh Yeomanry) Company. Died of disease in South Africa. No more is currently known of him.

 

Stanley Williams, Trooper, 23174, 21st/83rd Sharpshooters, Imperial Yeomanry. Stanley was the son of John Williams, of Llanelli, and had been educated at the Castle School, Kidwelly. He had worked for the Ordnance Survey in London prior to the war. He was killed in action near Sanderton on 22 August 1901, during the siege of the garrison town. He is buried at Standerton, Mpumalanga.

 

William Arthur Glanmor Williams, Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. William was born on 18 September 1873, the son of Hugh Williams and Elizabeth Williams (nee Anthony), of Cobden Villa, Ferryside, Carmarthenshire. He was educated at Clifton College, then went straight to Sandhurst and was commissioned in the 2nd Battalion the South Wales Borderers in May 1893. William served with distinction with the Royal Niger Company, in West Africa, and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. When the Boer War broke out he volunteered for active duty and arrived in South Africa in February 1900 where he was attached to the 8th Mounted Infantry as staff officer. On 6 November 1900, a force including the 8th Mounted Infantry surprised a large Boer encampment outside Bothaville, in the Orange Free State. The Boer Commander De Wet and President Steyn of the Orange Free State managed to escape. During the battle Colonel Ross, William’s commander, came under heavy sniper fire, which wounded Ross. William ran out under heavy fire and dragged his commander to safety, but was hit several times, and died shortly afterwards. In the despatch of Lord Kitchener of 8 May 1901, the death of William is mentioned, and another report stated that had William survived, he would have been recommended for the Victoria Cross. William is buried within the Garden of Rememberance at Bothaville. The inscription on the gravestone reads; ‘In Memory of Lieut. William Arthur Glanmor Williams DSO., 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers. Who fell in Action near this spot, November 6th 1900. Aged 27 years.’ William was also Mentioned in Despatches for his gallantry, on 10 September 1901.

 

Other Boer War Heroes from Carmarthenshire

 

Thomas St Clair Davidson, Major, Prince of Wales Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians). Thomas was born at Edinburgh on 12 September 1861, the son of Colonel Sir David Davidson, KCB, and Margaret Buchanan.  He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and Edinburgh University, and was gazetted to the Leinster Regiment on 19 December 1883. He served in India for several years, and was promoted to Major on 29 November 1899, in which rank he served with the 1st Battalion Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians) during the Anglo Boer War. Thomas took part in the operations in the Transvaal in June and July 1901, and in the operations in Orange River Colony, from June 1901 to 31 May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches in the London Gazette of 29 July 1902. Thomas received the Queen's Medal with five clasps for South Africa, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order in the London gazette of 31 October 1902; ‘Thomas St Clair Davidson, Major, The Leinster Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa’. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on 23 May 1907, and retired on 2 September 1911. Thomas re-enlisted at the outbreak of the Great War, serving as a Censor in London, then from 25 September 1914 to 19 April 1916, as Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding the 9th Battalion, The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment in France and Salonika. Thomas married Agnes Davies at Bridgend on 2 November 1892, the daughter of T Davies, of Bryn Towy, Carmarthen, and they had four children; Dorothy Forster, Winefred Anne, Robert St Clair, and Ileene Hanbury.  Agnes died in 1910, and on 16 January 1912 Thomas married Flora Isabella Farquhar at Reigate, the youngest daughter of James Farquhar, of Sunnyside, Reigate, and Hall Green, Kincardineshire, and they had one daughter, Diana Jean.

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