West Wales War Memorial Project
West Wales War Memorial Project

The Forgotten Soldiers

There are many war memorials around the country which record details of men and women who are not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC). For example, the Carmarthen County Memorial commemorates almost 2,000 men and women who fell during the Great War alone, the Pembroke County Memorial commemorates 1,354 men and women who fell during the Great War, and in Ceredigion, which has no county memorial, over 1,400 men and women who fell during the Great War are commemorated.

 

Among all of these names, it is quite often impossible to identify a person, especially when they are not commemorated by the CWGC. However, on occasion, I have come across many men who have died as a result of wounds or illness incurred during the war who have somehow slipped through the net for commemoration, and have also found at least three soldiers who were killed in action but not commemorated, plus over a hundred more in west Wales who died as a result of their service but have been forgotten.

 

During the course of my research for the website, and also of Welsh servicemen and women for my books, I have also come across several cases where men are incorrectly commemorated by the CWGC and as a result have researched these omissions in order to get the CWGC to properly commemorate these men.

 

Many are not eligible for commemoration due to the CWGC and MOD rules, regarding date and cause of death, or even lack of evidence, but it has been my aim to attempt to get as many of these ‘forgotten’ casualties of war commemorated, by first gathering together as much evidence as I can, and then by working in conjunction with the ‘In From The Cold Project’, to attempt to get them commemorated by the CWGC. The results of some of this work can be seen below.

The Great War, 1914-1918

 

Recently Commemorated Welsh Soldiers.

 

William George Anthony, Private, 4376, Pembroke Yeomanry. William was the son of John and Mary Anthony, of Penpont, Llanarthney. He enlisted at Carmarthen on 17 October 1914 into the Pembroke Yeomanry. William served in Egypt with the 1/1st Battalion, Pembroke Yeomanry from 4 March 1916 until being evacuated sick on 5 September 1916. He was hospitalised in Britain after returning home, and was found to be suffering from tuberculosis brought on by his service in Egypt. He was subsequently discharged from the army as medically unfit, and went to live with his parents, who had moved to Brynceitho, Cefneithin. He died on 4 November 1918 aged 24. William's case was put forward to the CWGC on 8 May 2013, and he was accepted for commemoration on 11 November 2014. He will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until his grave can be found.

 

Gwilym Bennett, Private, 46765, South Wales Borderers. Gwilym was the son of David John Bennett and Cecilia Bennett, of 6, Sandy Gate Terrace, Llanelli. He was educated at Pentip School prior to enlisting into the South Wales Borderers on 28 December 1916. He was posted to the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. Gwilym was invalided home and discharged from the army on 18 February 1919. He died at home of Pthisis at 10, Raby Street, Llanelli on 8 May 1919 as a result of sickness brought about by his military service. Gwilym is buried in Box Cemetery, Llanelli, together with his parents and several of his siblings. He was not commemorated by the CWGC for almost 99 years until being accepted for commemoration on Friday 23 February 2018 as a result of my research. His father David had been one of the original members of the 15th Welsh (Carmarthen Pals). Gwilym will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the location of his grave is verified.

Harold Berkeley Beynon, Private, 33181, Hampshire Regiment. Harold was the son of Thomas and Laura Annie Beynon, of Holloway, Penally. He later resided at St. Johns Hill, Tenby. Harold enlisted into the Pembroke Yeomanry on 1 April 1914, then served with the 3rd Welsh, before being posted to the 10th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. The Battalion became attached to 29 Brigade, 10th Division, and on 7 July 1915 sailed from Liverpool, arriving at Mudros 26 July 1915. The Battalion landed on Gallipoli on 6 August 1915, and fought there for a month before being sent to Salonika, where it joined 82 Brigade, 27th Division. Harold became ill with malaria while in Salonika and returned home for treatment. His service papers show that he was discharged in 1919 due to malaria. Sadly Harold died of meningitis and encephalitis soon after, on 16 May 1919. He was 21 years old. His place of burial has not yet been identified. Harold has just been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC (Friday 13 January 2012). He was originally to have been commemorated on the Brookwood (United Kingdom 1914-1918) Memorial, but following the discovery of his grave at St. Florence (St. Florencius) Churchyard, he is now commemorated as being buried there.

Charles Gordon Bowen, Private, 200080, Welsh Regiment. Charles was born at Pembroke in 1896. He married Matilda J. Williams at Pembroke in 1916, and the couple had a daughter, Edith Mary. They set up home at 2, Clifton Villa, Clynderwen. Charles enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, on 5 May 1913, and on the outbreak of war was called up to the colours. He fought at Gallipoli with the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. On 18 September he was admitted to the 1/1st Welsh Field Ambulance, suffering from pain. He was evacuated to England aboard H.S. Northland a week later, and was hospitalised at Pembroke Dock Military Hospital. Charles was then discharged, and was posted to Scoveston Camp, but took ill, and was diagnosed with tuberculosis, which led to him being discharged from the army on 5 November 1917. He died at Clynderwen on 10 March 1919, aged 22, and was buried at Pembroke (St. Michael) Cemetery on 15 March 1919. Charles has just been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC (Friday 13 January 2012), and will be commemorated on the Brookwood (United Kingdom 1914-1918) Memorial until the CWGC can verify the location of his grave.

Parcell Rees Bowen, MC, DFC and Bar, Captain, Welsh Regiment. Parcell was the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Bowen, of Pantyglien, Abergwili. He was a student at St. David's College, Lampeter when he enlisted at the outbreak of War, becoming a Private in the Army Service Corps. He spent the Winter of 1914/15 in France, but in February 1915 was sent home with badly frostbitten feet. In July that year, he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant into the 5th Welsh, and he embarked with the Battalion for Gallipoli, where the Battalion formed part of 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division fought at Gallipoli until the evacuation in December, suffering badly from casualties, forcing the 5th Welsh to merge with the 4th Welsh for a short period. After the evacuation, Parcell fought in the Palestinian Campaign, where he then transferred into the Machine Gun Corps, and it was with them that he was awarded his first decoration, the Military Cross. Parcell then transferred into the Royal Air Force on 10 January 1918, becoming an Observer. He gained his second decoration during the air war in Egypt, the Distinguished Service Order. After the Armistice on 11 November 1918, Parcell served in Salonika and Mesopotamia, before being placed on the unemployed list. Again though, Parcell wanted more adventure, and so he volunteered for further service with the R.A.F. in their private war in North Russia, fighting for the White Russians. On 17 July 1919 Parcell arrived at Archangel, where he met his old compatriot from Carmarthen, Ira 'Taffy' Jones. Ira wrote glowing reports of Parcell, being glad to see another Welsh Warrior in his Squadron. A long passage from 'An Airfighters Scrapbook' tells of an incident that earned Parcell a Bar to his Distinguished Flying Cross. In short, Parcell and his Pilot were carrying out a bombing mission when they came across a superior force of Russian Aeroplanes. Being the men they were, they agreed to attack the Russians, who dispersed in chaos when these two madmen plunged into their midst. The Russians took flight, but one fired a burst of rounds at the British pair, and Parcell and his Pilot were hit. The Pilot fainted at the controls of the aeroplane, and Parcell only had one good arm, but he leaned over his colleague and piloted the aeroplane back nearly 100 miles to base. Parcell was sent home wounded, and again placed on the Unemployed List, so volunteered for a Commission into the Lithuanian Army, with whom he served until July 1920 when he accepted a Government Post. This post was Top Secret, and involved him going undercover in Dublin, at the time when the troubles were at a peak. Due to the secrecy of the work being carried out in Ireland, nothing much is known about the operations Parcell was engaged in. What is known is that Parcell had been lodging with a fellow Officer at 28, Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin, and the two had spent the afternoon of 27 October 1920 watching a football match at Donnybrook. After the match, Parcell could not be found, until his lifeless body was discovered, lying face down, at Merrion Street. He had been shot in the back by an IRA assassin, the bullet hitting his spine. Parcell's body was brought back to Carmarthen, where he was buried with full military honours in Abergwili Churchyard. There is a theory that Parcell was murdered by MI5, as the Irish never owned up to his killing. (Please note this website was the original source of this information and photographs that have since been copied by an Irish website without permission).

James Carne, Fireman, Mercantile Marine. James was born in Swansea in 1884, the son of Susan Carne, of 3, Punch Court. His father died when he was a young boy and James went to sea, and lived while ashore at 5, Yorke Street, Liverpool. By the outbreak of the Great War he was serving with the Mercantile Marine as a Fireman aboard the Cunard liner, SS Lusitania. She had been built with the help of government subsidies and at the outbreak of war was requisitioned by the Admiralty for used as an armed merchant cruiser, but remained on her usual route between Liverpool and New York. She left New York on 1 May 1915 with 1,959 people aboard, including her crew of 694. On 7 May 1915, Lusitania was nearing safety, and was sailing past the Old Head of Kinsale, off Ireland, when she was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U-20, and sank with the loss of 1,198 lives. James was 30 years old when he died in the sinking. He has never been commemorated by the CWGC, but following some research for my latest books I came across his name on the Swansea Cenotaph and carried out some research into him in order to get him properly commemorated as a war casualty. On Thursday 18 January 2018 he was officially accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC and his name will be added to the Tower Hill Memorial in London in due course.

 

Reginald Wilfred Collard, Private, 321150, Royal Army Service Corps. Reginald was the son of Edward John Collard and Emily Collard (née Harwood), of 3 Summerfield Place, Whitchurch, Cardiff. He enlisted at Cardiff into the Army Service Corps on 16 December 1916 as a motor driver, after having worked as a driver/ mechanic at Cardiff, and was posted to their Grove Park depot. He was posted to 623 Company on 11 May 1917, but on 26 December 1917 was discharged as being deemed unfit for military service after having been found to be suffering from heart disease. His sickness was adjudged to have been aggravated by his military service, so Reginald received a small pension. His health continued to deteriorate even further, and he died of heart disease at home at 3, Summerfield Place on 18 October 1918, aged 19. The location of his grave has not yet been identified, so Reginald will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance in the CWGC offices at Maidenhead. He was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research on Saturday 3 March 2018. Tragically, a brother, William Ernest Collard, was killed on the Somme on 21 October 1916, whilst a second brother, Edward John Collard, died of sickness whilst serving with the RAF on 18 February 1919.

Robert Corfield, Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. Robert was born in 1887, the son of Elizabeth Corfield of 43 North Parade, Aberystwyth. He was a hairdresser prior to the war, and was a pre-war Territorial with the Cardigan Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Robert was mobilised at the outbreak of war, and moved with the Battery to Bedford. On 26 August 1915, the Battery was on manoeuvres when Robert fainted whilst sat on a gun carriage, and fell backwards, under the wheels. He received a broken jaw and depression to the back of the head, which killed him instantly. Robert was 27 years old, and was buried with full military honours in Aberystwyth Municipal Cemetery. Robert's case has just been submitted to the CWGC. (5 August 2012). On Friday 7 February 2014, Robert’s case has finally been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC, although they show him as being commemorated by the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance, he is definitely buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Aneurin Davies, Private, 34583, Rifle Brigade. Aneurin was born on 9 August 1893, the son of Thomas and Rachel Davies, of 29, Long Row, Swansea Road, Llanelli. He had been a tin-worker before enlisting into the 7th (Queen's Own) Hussars on 10 July 1912. Aneurin was badly injured when his horse reared up and fell on him while training at Shorncliffe riding school, and spent several months in hospital before being discharged from the Hussars as unfit on 8 December 1913 after having been diagnosed with pleurisy. Aneurin then took up work as a Draper at Seaford, Sussex, and re-enlisted at Winchester on 15 March 1915 into the Rifle Brigade. Aneurin was posted to France with the 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade on 1 June 1915. He was shot in the right hand at Ypres on 9 July 1915, and was discharged from the Rifle Brigade on 8 June 1916, before returning to Llanelli. Undeterred, Aneurin again re-enlisted at Carmarthen on 23 October 1917 into the 6th Battalion, Rifle Brigade. Aneurin was discharged from the army again on 12 February 1918 after being deemed unfit for service, being diagnosed with tuberculosis, and again returned to Llanelli. He died at 29, Long Row, Llanelli on 12 April 1919, aged 24, and was buried at Box Cemetery. Aneurin's case was submitted to the CWGC in August 2013 and he was accepted for commemoration on 2 October 2015. He is commemorated on the Glenalla Chapel war memorial in Llanelli.

 

Benjamin Oscar Davies, Private, 1644, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin was the son of Henry and Maria Davies, of Long Island Farm, Camrose. He enlisted at Hafod, Swansea on 29 November 1913 into the 6th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin landed in France with the battalion on 28 October 1914, and saw action during First Ypres. Benjamin became ill whilst at Le Bassée, and was sent to the 2nd General Hospital at Richmond for treatment in May 1915, before being discharged from the army on 9 June 1915. Benjamin died of tuberculosis, brought on by his gas poisoning, on 10 June 1916. His case was submitted to the CWGC on 5 August 2012, and he has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Tuesday 22 July 2014. He was temporarily commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance, until he was found to be buried in Haverfordwest (St. Thomas A Beckett) Churchyard and a new CWGC Portland headstone has recently been erected. His brother, Harding Melbourne Davies, also fell, and is commemorated on the Camrose War Memorial.

James Lloyd Davies, Corporal, 371137, Royal Garrison Artillery. James was the son of Hugh James Davies and Margaret Davies, of 3, Cross Street, Dyffryn, Goodwick. He enlisted into the Pembroke Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery on 29 May 1913, and went to France with the battery on 14 June 1916. He was wounded within a month of being in France, and returned home for treatment, before heading back to France on 1 April 1918. James was wounded again on 24 September 1918, and again returned home for treatment. He survived the war, but died of Pthisis brought on by his war service, on 7 February 1920. James has just been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC (Friday 13 January 2012). His name was originally destined to be added to the Brookwood (United Kingdom 1914-1918) Memorial, although the location of his grave was discovered in Fishguard (Hermon) Baptist Chapelyard, and a new CWGC headstone has recently been erected by the CWGC.

John Davies, Private, 214777, South Wales Borderers. John was the son of Thomas and Anne Davies, of Minyrafon, Blaenau Road, Llandeilo. He worked as an ironmonger prior to enlisting at Colwyn Bay on 22 February 1915 into the 10th Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division and during the summer of 1915 moved to Winchester with the division to commence training in preparation to move to France. On 23 July John was training with his battalion at Hazeley Down Camp when he began coughing up blood and was sent to hospital at Winchester where he was diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis. He was discharged as medically unfit on 22 October 1915 and returned to Llandeilo, but his health deteriorated to the extent that he was sent to Neath Hospital in 1918, and died there on 26 April 1918, aged 34. John was buried in Bethel Cemetery, Rhosmaen. Following the submission of evidence regarding John’s death to the CWGC earlier this year by myself, he was finally accepted for commemoration by them on Friday 30 October 2015. He will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the location of his grave is verified.

 

Thomas Davies, Corporal, 16317, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was born at Brynonen, near Bwlchnewydd Chapel, Laugharne in 1886, the son of John and Margaret Davies. The family moved to St. Clears when Thomas was young, and resided at Penpitch, with John working as a Platelayer with the GWR. The family later moved again, to 38, Henry Street, Bargoed. Thomas enlisted there soon after the outbreak of war into the 10th (Service) Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The Battalion had formed in 1914 and trained at Rhyl, then moved to Winchester, where it became part of 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. Thomas landed with the battalion at Le Havre on 2 December 1915, and the Division moved to the Armentieres sector, where they were initiated into trench warfare. In June 1916 the Division marched south to the Somme, where on 7 July 1916 it launched its assault on the fortified Mametz Wood. The initial attack was repulsed at a heavy cost of lives due to well positioned German machine guns, and after a change in Commander renewed its assault on 10 July. The initial assault was renewed by 114 Brigade on the right, with two battalions of 113 Brigade on the left. Thomas was with the 10th Welsh in reserve, on the ground overlooking the wood. Later in the morning the 10th Welsh were sent into the wood to reinforce the Brigade. Thomas was wounded in the head at Mametz, and sent back to the UK via Hospital Ship. He died of his wounds at the 1st Welsh General Hospital, Liverpool on 23 July 1916. His body was brought back to Bargoed for burial, but he is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey, so his place of burial was not reported to the authorities. Following a lot of work, I have finally discovered that he is buried in Bedwellty (St. Sannan) Churchyard. I have forwarded evidence to the CWGC in order for them to amend their records and this will enable Thomas to have a CWGC headstone, after 101 years without one!

 

Thomas Henry Davies, Smith Gunner, 1938, Royal Garrison Artillery. Thomas was the son of William and Margaret Davies, of 45, Merlin's Hill, Haverfordwest. He married Sarah John on 5 October 1905 and the couple moved in with Thomas's parents, where they had four children. Thomas was a Carriage Smith, and also a reservist, and on 5 September 1914 had rejoined the Royal Garrison Artillery. He was posted to the RGA Depot before joining the 5th Siege Battery in France on 23 December 1914. On 15 May 1915 he was hospitalised after taking ill in France, and returned to England where he was found to have contracted tuberculosis. On 7 February 1916 he was discharged as medically unfit, and returned to Haverfordwest. He died on 29 August 1917 aged 43, and was buried in St. Thomas' Cemetery, Haverfordwest. Thomas was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Thursday 5 March 2015, and was commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the CWGC verified his burial at St. Thomas's and a new white Portland headstone has recently been erected in the Churchyard.

Thomas Owen Davies, Lance Corporal, 428278, Canadian Infantry. Thomas was born on 14 February 1893, the son of Owen Davies and Mary Ann Davies (née Hurley), of Garden Village, Machynlleth. The family later resided at 55, Bridge Street, Aberystwyth, while Thomas migrated to Canada at some time after 1911. He enlisted at New Westminster, British Columbia on 7 April 1915 into the 7th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He sailed for England with his battalion on 13 November 1915 and after training on Salisbury Plain the Canadians moved to France. Thomas served at Ypres and on the Somme with the battalion before his health began to fail and he was transferred to the Canadian Forestry Corps in February 1918. He was later found to have contracted tuberculosis and returned to Canada for treatment before returning to Wales after the war. Thomas died at Machynlleth on 1 March 1921, aged 29 and was buried in Penegoes Churchyard, Machynlleth. His case was submitted to the CWGC on 5 December 2016 and he was accepted for commemoration on Tuesday 20 December 2016. He was reported to have been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry during a German gas attack at Ypres on 3 June 1916, for bringing in wounded men whilst under heavy rifle and machine-gun fire, but the award cannot be traced.

 

William Henry Davies, Rifleman, C/108, King’s Royal Rifle Corps. William was the son of Joseph and Martha Davies, of 68, Alexandra Terrace, Brynmill, Swansea. He enlisted into the King’s Royal Rifle Corps at Swansea on 16 September 1914 and married Norah Peer Calladine at Swansea on 12 October 1914, while on leave. William was posted to the 16th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, which was known as the Church Lads Brigade, and was attached to 100 Brigade, 33rd Division. The battalion embarked for France on 16 November 1915 and saw its first major action during the Battles of the Somme, from July 1916 onwards. The division then moved north and fought at the Battle of the Scarpe and at Bullecourt, before heading to Ypres, and took part in the Battles of the Menin Road and Polygon Wood. On 30 November 1917 the battalion was in the line near Passchendaele village when it came under heavy artillery fire, suffering a number of casualties. William was among the men killed that day. He was 27 years old and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. While trying to identify William, it appeared at first that he was another un-commemorated case, but after extensive research into him, I discovered that he had been incorrectly commemorated as Herbert Davies by the CWGC, and with no family details being held by them, was almost impossible to identify. As a result of my work enough evidence was found to enable the CWGC to correct his name, after 100 years of him being wrongly named on their debt of honour, and this has recently been corrected.

 

Thomas Edwards, Private, 53675, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Rees and Elizabeth Edwards, of Chapel House, Llandeilo. He had served with the Pembroke Yeomanry prior to the war and re-enlisted at Carmarthen on 2 January 1915 into the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He served in France during 1916 but became ill and was posted back to Redcar, where he was discharged as medically unfit on 19 January 1917. He returned to his home at Llandeilo, where he died on 24 October 1918, aged 26. His case was initially rejected by the CWGC, but luckily I was able to find his service papers and re-submitted his case. Thomas was finally accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on 2 October 2015. He will be commemorated on the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the location of his grave can be located.

Anthony Evans, Guardsman, 1937, Welsh Guards. Anthony was the husband of Madeline Evans (nee Chivers), of 20, Gilfach Road, Tonyrefail. He enlisted at Tonypandy into the Welsh Guards and was posted to France at some time during 1916. Anthony survived the attack of the Guards Division on Pilckem Ridge on 31 July but was killed just before his battalion was relieved from the front line in the Langemarck sector on 4 September 1917. He is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, Belgium. Since his death the details of his widow have been mistakenly attached to another guardsman (below) by the CWGC and Anthony was commemorated with no details of his next of kin. Following research by myself for my attest book I came across this error and sent the details to the IFCP who informed the CWGC. The details of the two men have subsequently been corrected on 2 April 2016.

Edmund Evans, Guardsman, 1398, Welsh Guards. Edmund was the son of William and Hannah Winifred Evans, of 1, Cledwyn Terrace, Trecynon. He enlisted at Aberdare into the Welsh Guards and embarked for France with the battalion on 17 August 1915 and served through all its major actions, at Loos, the Somme and at Pilckem Ridge. He was killed in action at Langemarck on 3 September 1917 aged 20 and is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, Belgium. Since his death he has been commemorated by the CWGC as A. Evans, and had the wife of another Guardsman, Anthony Evans (above) attached to him. Following research by myself for my next book, I came across these errors and carried out deeper research on both men in order to prove to the CWGC that the details they had were incorrect. These mistakes were corrected with the help of the IFCP on 2 April 2016.

Edward Idris Evans, Sergeant, 49945, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Idris was born in 1890, the son of William Evans and Rhoda Martha Evans (nee Davies), of Penygare, Kidwelly. He enlisted at Kidwelly on 3 September 1914 into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th Division. The battalion landed in France on 18 July 1915, moving to positions near Festubert. It took part in the opening attack of the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. Idris was promoted to Sergeant that day, after having showed good leadership qualities during the disastrous attack. The following year the Division moved to the Somme, where it took part in the second wave of the attack on Ovillers-La Boiselle on 1 July, capturing the village at heavy cost. It then fought through the Somme Battles of Pozieres and the Ancre in 1916. Idris was wounded on the Somme, and invalided home, being posted to the Depot Battalion at Cardiff after recovering. When he was sent back to France on 11 August 1917 he was transferred to the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, in the same brigade as his old unit. Idris caught up with his new battalion at Ypres, in time to take part in heavy fighting, at the Battles of the Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele Village itself. For his bravery during the fighting at Ypres, Idris was awarded the Military Medal, the award of which was published in the London Gazette of 17 December 1917. In 1918 the division was caught up in the German Spring Offensive near St. Quentin, where they suffered terrible casualties, during a brave rearguard action near Bapaume. Idris was wounded here on 25 March 1918, and was invalided home. While in hospital recovering from his wounds, a persistent cough which he had developed in France was found to be tuberculosis, so Idris was discharged from the army on 30 August 1918. He died of tuberculosis at 2, Priory Street, Kidwelly on 1 November 1919, aged 29 years, and was buried with full military honours at Capel Sul Chapelyard. Edward has just been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC (Saturday 5 April 2014).

Francis Ficken, Company Sergeant Major, 12260, Welsh Regiment. Francis was born in Whitechapel on 25 May 1878, the son of Francis and Sarah Ficken. As a child he was living in the borough when the infamous Ripper killings took place ten years later. He had served during the Boer War and after retiring from the army had settled at Pengwern Road, Clydach, marrying Catherine John in 1914. He re-enlisted at the outbreak of the war and joined the 19th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the Pioneer Battalion to the 38th (Welsh) Division and was given the army number 12260. With his military experience he was soon promoted, becoming a CSM in the battalion. He had served in France from June 1916, and did not join the battalion in the field until after the 38th (Welsh) Division had been evacuated from Mametz Wood. He served with the battalion throughout its long period on the Canal Bank at Ypres, and saw action at Pilckem Ridge on 31 July 1917 and later moved with the battalion to Armentieres before returning home on leave on 9 March 1918. By 5 August the strains of life on the Western Front had taken their toll on his health, and he was evacuated from the 130th Field Ambulance to hospital, before returning to England on 19 August 1918 and sent to the Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich. Over two years on active service had caused his health to deteriorate rapidly and he was seconded to a desk job with the Food Control Office, but he suddenly became worse and he died of heart disease on 31 December 1918 aged forty two. Ficken was buried with full military honours in Salem Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, Clydach. His case was forwarded to the CWGC on 8 July 2015 and he was accepted for commemoration on Friday 30 October 2015. I am presently trying to locate the burial register for Salem to prove that Francis is buried there, otherwise he will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance.

 

William Henry Fisher, Private, 17053, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of William Henry Fisher, ambulance driver, of 9, Hall Terrace, Swansea. He was an engineer and married Elizabeth Maud Norman at Swansea on 25 January 1913. William enlisted at Swansea into the 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 28 September 1914. The battalion trained at Rhyl as part of the Welsh Division. On 6 February 1915 William became ill and was rushed to hospital, where he was diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis. He was invalided from the army on 10 July 1915 and died at his father's home on 25 November 1915, aged twenty four. William was buried with full military honours in Swansea (Cockett) Cemetery. His case was forwarded to the CWGC by myself on 8 July 2015 and he was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 28 October 2015.

 

Alfred Gilmore, Private, 20660, Welsh Regiment. Alfred was born in St. Mary’s, Monmouth in 1866, the son of Samson and Ann Gilmore. He had worked as a labourer prior to enlisting into the Welsh Regiment on 15 September 1882, serving with the 2nd Welsh in Ireland, Mauritius, South Africa, Egypt and Malta until being discharged on 10 September 1894 after spending a short time in prison for desertion. He then worked as a miner prior to enlisting into the Royal Monmouth Royal Engineers on 23 March 1898, but was discharged for misconduct two years later. At the outbreak of war Alfred re-enlisted, joining the 5th Welsh and was posted on garrison duty to St. Fagan’s. On 13 March 1915 Alfred was on guard duty at St. Fagan’s railway station when he fell into the path of a train and was killed. The 52 year old was buried with full military honours in St. Mary’s Church, St. Fagans. His case was forwarded to the CWGC by myself last year and he was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 25 March 2016.

 

Samuel Arthur Griffiths, Telegraphist, J22443, Royal Navy. Samuel was born in Wrington, Somerset on 25 September 1897, the son of Arthur and Mary Jane Griffiths. He worked as a cattle dealers assistant at Tredegar prior to enlisting into the Royal Navy on 25 September 1915 as a Boy 2nd Class. He was based at HMS Vivid I for his initial training before being posted aboard the dreadnaught HMS Erin. On 6 November 1915 he was transferred to the super-dreadnaught HMS Canada and served on her before his health begun to fail. Samuel was hospitalised at Devonport before being discharged from the Royal Navy and died at Tredegar of tuberculosis on 14 May 1917, aged 19. He is buried in Tredegar (St James) Churchyard. His case was submitted to the CWGC following my discovery of him and he was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 8 March 2017.

 

William Ronald Hastings, Private, 78599, Welsh Regiment. William was the son of Robert and Annie Hastings, of 13, Chapel Street, Milford Haven. William worked as a Butcher's Assistant prior to enlisting into the Welsh Regiment on 24 June 1918, and was posted to the 52nd Training Reserve Battalion at Kinmel Park. Within months he became ill, and was invalided to Norfolk War Hospital in Norwich where he was found to be suffering from tuberculosis, and he was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 7 November 1918. William died of tuberculosis at Hubberston on 16 March 1919, aged just 18, and is buried in Milford Haven Cemetery. William's case was passed onto the CWGC on 5 August 2012. He was initially rejected through lack of evidence on 21 July 2014, but has today, Tuesday 22 October 1914 been accepted for commemoration after further evidence was uncovered. He was temporarily commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance, pending confirmation of his burial at Milford, but this has since been confirmed and a new CWGC headstone has been erected over his grave.

William Harold George Henshaw, Private, O7946, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. William was the son of David Henshaw (a policeman) and Mary Ann Henshaw, of 82, Swansea Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli on 23 May 1915 into the Army Ordnance Corps, and was posted to Woolwich. He served there until discharged due to ill health on 22 April 1916 and returned to Llanelli. William died on 12 December 1917 aged 23 as a result of tuberculosis brought about by his military service. William is buried in Llanelli District Cemetery. He was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Saturday 26 April 2014.

 

David Alfred Hodges, Z/2750, Ordinary Seaman, Royal Naval Reserve. David was born on 17 February 1896, the son of Thomas and Mary Hodges, of 41, Robinson Street, Llanelli. He worked for the GWR at Llanelli prior to the war, and enlisted into the Royal Naval Reserve on 24 December 1915, training as a Wireless Operator. He was posted to Milford Haven, where he served as a Wireless Operator aboard HM Trawler Imelda, which had been requisitioned by the Admiralty for use as a minesweeper. David survived the war, but died of tuberculosis on 3 June 1919, aged 23. He is buried with his parents at Box Cemetery, Llanelli. His details were passed to the CWGC on 6 February 2013, and he has finally been accepted for commemoration by them on Friday 5 July 2013, after almost 94 years of being forgotten. David was temporarily commemorated on the UK Book of Remembrance at Maidenhead, Berkshire, until the location of his grave was verified.

Fred Holland, Private, 46417, Welsh Regiment. Fred was born at Newport, Monmouth and enlisted there into the Welsh Regiment. He was posted to France at some time during the winter of 1916-17, joining the 17th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division. The Division was in position ready for an assault on Villers Plouich by 23 April. Their attack began at 4.15 am on 24 April and met with little opposition except at Beaucamp, with the 17th Welsh advancing a mile before being forced to dig in along a spur east of the village where the men came under heavy artillery fire. One officer and thirty men were killed during the day, including Fred Holland. Oddly all but one of the men of the 17th Welsh killed at Villers Plouich on 24 April have known graves. One man, Fred Holland, was commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial. In Fifteen Ravine British Cemetery, Villers Plouich is a headstone marked: A Soldier of the Great War, Welsh Regiment. 24th April 1917. Following some detailed research I presented the CWGC with evidence to prove that Fred Holland was buried in this grave. On 30 November 2015 I received a letter from the MoD confirming that they agree with his research and on 23 March 2016 a new headstone will be erected and rededicated for Private Holland. After almost 99 years this fallen soldier will finally get a named headstone.

Robert Hosking, Private, 29214, Welsh Regiment. Robert was born in 1888, the son of Thomas and Margaret Hosking, of Swansea. He married Beatrice Luxton on 24 March 1915 and later that year enlisted into the 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Swansea Pals). He landed in France with the Swansea Pals on 2 December 1915 and served on the Western Front until becoming ill in 1917. He was sent home for hospital treatment after being found to have contracted tuberculosis and died in Swansea on 8 January 1920. Whilst researching non-commemorated men on the Swansea Cenotaph I came across this man but he had been wrongly recorded as having died on 10 January 1921. The purchase of his death certificate and his service papers confirmed that he did die on 8 January 1920, so the details on his CWGC entry will now be changed.

 

James Howells, Private, 38169, Welsh Regiment. James was the son of Hugh and Elizabeth Howells, of Waunbeddau, St. Davids. He enlisted into the Welsh Regiment on 1 June 1915 and was posted to the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. The division moved to France in July 1915 and James took part in its costly assault during the Battle of Loos on 25 September. By January 1916 trench life had taken its toll on his health and James was hospitalised at Rouen. He was diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis and returned to England, dying on 11 May 1916 aged twenty. James is possibly buried in Croesgoch. His case was forwarded to the CWGC by myself on 8 July 2015 and James was accepted for commemoration on Tuesday 27 October 2015. He will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until proof of his burial can be found.

Morgan Price James, Private, 14833, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Morgan was the son of Mary Thomas, of Cilrhedyn Villa, Colbren Road, Gwaun-cae-Gurwen. His story is one of some mystery, as it has taken a lot of work to finally identify him, due to errors in official records. Morgan enlisted at Cardiff into the army, and was posted to the 7th Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. The battalion was attached to 61 Brigade, 20th (Light) Division, and moved to France in September 1915. The division was thrust into action at Fromelles within weeks of landing, before being transferred to Ypres. It remained here for several months, taking part in the Battle for Mount Sorrel, before being posted to the Somme sector in September 1916. Morgan was killed while the battalion was in the line near Ypres on 30 June 1916, while attempting to rescue a wounded comrade. The battalion must have been attacked by German flamethrowers, as an article in a local newspaper stated that a charred photograph of Morgan with his family was taken from his pocket and sent home to his mother. Morgan was 22 years old, and is buried at White House Cemetery, St. Jean-les-Ypres. He is shown on both SDGW and the CWGC website as being named James Morgan, which has made identifying him impossible, until a small article was discovered while trawling through archives of Llais Llafur. He is also incorrectly shown as serving with the 9th KOYLI, which was on the Somme when he died, so I have passed my research onto the CWGC in order to get his name and headstone corrected. Some poetry was published in his honour in the ‘Amman Valley Chronicle’ of 24 August 1916, entitled ‘Deigryn Hiraeth’, which translates as ‘A tear in grief’. (As of today, Monday 17 October 2016, his name has been corrected by the CWGC).

Bertie Jenkins, M22936, Royal Navy, HMS Victory II. Bertram (Bertie) was born on 15 August 1895, the son of William and Anne Jenkins, of Guildford, Burton. Bertie and his father worked at Pembroke Dockyard prior to the war, and on 19 September 1916, Bertie enlisted into the Royal Navy. After training at HMS Victory, in Portsmouth, Bertie was posted to HMS Amphitrite. HMS Amphitrite was a Diadem-class Cruisers, which had been built at Vickers Limited, Barrow in Furness and launched on 5 January 1898. At the outbreak of was she was part of the Ninth Cruiser Squadron, serving in the Atlantic. In June 1915 she was placed in reserve, but reactivated as a minelayer in 1917, which is when Bertie joined her crew. Bertie took ill with chronic bronchitis while serving aboard Amphritrite, and was hospitalised at Portsmouth. He was discharged on 14 February 1918, but died at 24, Prospect Place, Pembroke Dock of Bronchitis on 5 May 1918, aged 21. Bertie was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on 6 April 2012. There is a headstone in Llangwm Cemetery commemorating Bertie but the burial register does not show him being interred there, so Bertie is commemorated on the Addenda Panel of the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire. Many thanks to Richard Horton for finding Bertie's commemorative headstone and for sending photographs of it in. Bertie's case was unwittingly forwarded to the CWGC independently by Jonny Woodhouse and myself at the same time.

Arthur Gwilym John, Lance Corporal, 3438, Welsh Regiment. Arthur was born on 3 April 1884, the son of Thomas and Mary John, of Roadside, Ludchurch. He married Mary Jane Gronow in 1906 and the couple resided at 106, Bonvilstone Road, Pontypridd. He enlisted at Pontypridd on 12 March 1915 into the 2/5th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was a reserve battalion and remained on home service throughout the war. He was discharged as medically unfit on 8 April 1916 after contracting chronic bronchitis and returned home to Pontypridd where he died on 7 March 1919 aged 34, just three days after his wife Mary died of influenza. Arthur’s case was submitted to the CWGC on 7 November 2015 and he was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 9 December 2015. Arthur is buried in Pontypridd (Glyntaff) Cemetery.

 

William John, Sapper, 63065, Royal Engineers. William was the husband of Margaret John (nee Owen), of Glyn-y-Mel Road, Lower Town, Fishguard. He enlisted into the Royal Engineers on 6 March 1915 and was posted to North Wales to join the 38th Signal Company, which was attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division. The division moved to Winchester soon after William joined his unit, and it began training as a complete unit in preparation for its move to France in December 1915. On 17 September 1915 William was among a large number of men inoculated for typhoid, but within days he began to suffer from some sort of reaction and was hospitalised. He was finally discharged from the army as medically unfit on 10 May 1916, suffering from breathlessness and heart problems. He returned to Fishguard where he died on 6 May 1917, aged 31. William’s details were passed onto the CWGC on 7 November 2015 and he was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 9 December 2015. He is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, as his place of burial is not known.

 

Ben John Jones, Private, 69527, Royal Army Medical Corps. Ben was born at St. Ishmaels, Carmarthenshire. He resided at Als Park, Pontyberem, and was a Medical Student prior to enlisting into the Royal Army Medical Corps. Ben served in Italy, before becoming ill with tuberculosis, and was admitted to Bermondsey Military Hospital on 5 September 1918. He was then transferred to Hospital at Cardiff, but returned home, where he died of Tuberculosis on 10 March 1920, aged 25. The location of Ben's grave has not yet been identified. Ben has just been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC (Saturday 14 January 2012), and will be commemorated on the Brookwood (United Kingdom 1914-1918) Memorial.

 

Edward Jones, Sergeant, 200808, Welsh Regiment. Edward resided at Dryslwyn Station, Llangathen, the son of Mr. D. Jones. He enlisted on 15 October 1912 into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial unit. He didn't serve overseas, as he was deemed to be unfit, and was discharged on 23 October 1917 as being no longer physically fit for war service. Edward died of Tuberculosis at Station House, Dryslwyn on 14 January 1918, aged 28. Edward has just been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC (Saturday 14 January 2012), and was to be commemorated on the Brookwood (United Kingdom 1914-1918) Memorial. After a lot of work I finally managed to find that Edward was buried in Llangathen Churchyard, and the details were forwarded to the CWGC who have recently installed this headstone to commemorate him.

Francis Owen Jones, Private, 13211, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Francis, known as Frank, was the son of Owen and Elizabeth Jones, of Llanddeiniolen, Caernarvonshire. He had moved to Llandebie at some time prior to 1911, along with his brother-in-law Owen Huxley Thomas, and his sister, Mary Eliza Thomas, and they all lived at Gwynfa, Campbell Road, Llandybie. Frank enlisted at Ammanford on 1 September 1914 into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion moved to France in July 1915 attached to 58 Brigade, 19th Division, and moved to positions north of Loos. Frank had only been in France for three months, when ill health forced him to return home, and he died in Llandebie on 27 May 1916, aged 23. Frank was buried with full military honours in Llandebie (St. Tybie) Churchyard. Evidence of his service and death have recently been forwarded to the CWGC by myself, and Francis was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Thursday 12 February 2015, after almost 99 years of being forgotten. I have today, 16 April 2018, been sent this photograph of his new headstone by Dave Hanson. Seeing Francis commemorated at last on this new headstone makes all of the work worthwhile!

Frank Jones, Private, 12838, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Frank was born at Openshaw, Manchester in 1886. He enlisted at Welshpool into the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and departed for France with the battalion on 19 July 1915. The battalion was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division and saw its first major action during a diversionary attack near Givenchy on 25 September 1915. Frank was mortally wounded during the attack and died at the 59th Field Ambulance later that day. He is buried in Vieille-Chapelle New Military Cemetery, Lacouture, France. Probate was granted to his widow, Isabella, at 21, Dawson Street, West Gorton, Manchester. For many years another soldier has been identified as being buried in that grave and Frank has not been commemorated at all, but following my research, the CWGC has today, 30 March 2016, accepted Frank for commemoration.

 

John William Jones, Private, 1432, Welsh Horse Yeomanry. John was born at Oswestry in 1865. He had moved to London to work as a Dairyman as a teenager and on 16 May 1887 married Mary Jones at St Pancras where they raised two sons. He had served with the London Imperial Yeomanry at some time and travelled to Welshpool to enlist on 5 October 1915 into the Welsh Horse Yeomanry. With his previous military service, John was soon promoted to Corporal and served with the Welsh Horse on home service until being discharged as medically unfit on 25 September 1916. He returned home to his family at 1, Salisbury Parade, West Malling. John died of heart disease, which had been brought about by the strain of his military service, on 7 March 1919, aged 54. His details were passed onto the CWGC on 7 November 2015 and John was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 9 December 2015.

William John Jones, Driver, W/3765, Royal Field Artillery. William was born in 1892, the son of William and Jane Jones, of Bryn Y Mor, Borth. He lived at Gilfach Goch prior to the war, working as a bricklayer. William enlisted at Tonypandy on 23 April 1915 into the 38th (Welsh) Division Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery, and landed in France on 24 December 1915, joining up with the bulk of the 38th Division in the Fleurbaix sector. Very little is presently known of William, but he was discharged from the Royal Field Artillery on 11 December 1916 due to tuberculosis, and died at home in Craigfryn on 28 August 1917, aged 25. William's case was passed onto the CWGC on 5 August 2012, and he was accepted for commemoration on Thursday 7 August 2014.  He will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance, although he appears to have been buried in Llandre on 1 September 1917.

William Llewelyn Jones, Private, 55685, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. William was born in Trawsfynydd in 1893, the son of Llewelyn and Catherine Jones. He married Blodwen Davies in 1916 whilst working in the Trawsfynydd army camp. He was conscripted at Blaenau Festiniog into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and was posted to the 15th RWF, which was attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division. William was among a large number of casualties suffered by his battalion at Pilckem Ridge when he was killed in action at sometime between 31 July and 4 August 1917, aged 23. Probably due to a mix up in names, William has never been commemorated by the CWGC, as several men of his name, one with the same name and a similar number, were killed during the battle. Following evidence submitted by myself last year, William has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on 25 March 2016 and his name will be added to the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

 

Thomas Lee, Private, 31731, Welsh Regiment. Thomas lived with his partner Elizabeth Ackery at Glyncorrwg and was a coalminer prior to enlisting into the 10th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 15 July 1915. He landed in France with the battalion on 5 December that year and served through the fighting at Mametz Wood before taking ill during the winter of 1916-17. He returned home for treatment and was medically discharged from the army on 13 July 1917. He returned home to Glyncorrwg where he died on 26 February 1918 aged 38. His details were passed onto the CWGC on 7 November 2015 and Thomas was accepted for commemoration on Tuesday 8 December 2015.

 

David Spencer Lewis, Sapper, 643, Royal Engineers. David was the son of Henry and Anne Lewis, of 57, James Street, Llanelli. He was a Tinplate worker prior to enlisting at Llanelli on 14 October 1914 into the Welsh Field Company, Royal Engineers. He served for five months before falling ill and was diagnosed at Bedford Hospital as suffering from diabetes. He became very ill by the end of the year and spent some time in Cardiff Hospital before returning to Llanelli, and died at home on 11 March 1920, aged 24. His details were passed onto the CWGC on 7 November 2015 and David was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 9 December 2015.

John Lloyd, Private, 101679, Canadian Pioneers. John Lloyd was born on 19 November 1873, the only son of Walter and Mary Lloyd, East Pool Farm, Eglwyscummin. He married Sarah Jane James of Crunwere in 1900 and the family eventually settled at Meline, Lampeter Velfrey. About 1910 John went to Alberta, Canada to work as a miner at a small, newly opened coal mine near Red Deer. On 22 February 1916 John enlisted at Edmonton, Alberta into the 66th Edmonton (Overseas) Battalion, and arrived in England on 7 May 1916. He was posted to 1st Canadian Pioneers and left for France on 5 July 1916. On 6 August 1916 he was posted to 1st Canadian Entrenching Battalion in the field. He paraded sick on 5 December 1916, suffering from exposure to shell fire on the Somme, and was hospitalised for 10 days with V.D.H. and epilepsy, before rejoining his unit. On 3 September 1917 John again reported sick at Vimy Ridge. He had severe pains in his legs and chest and was immediately sent back to base hospital. He had suffered with heart pain and palpitations for some months prior to this. After 12 days treatment at Etaples, John was evacuated to Bethnal Green Hospital for 12 days, then Bromley for 10 days, Buxton 2 months, and to Liverpool for 5 weeks. He then returned to Wetaskiwin, Alberta, Canada, where he received further treatment before being discharged from the service on 17 August 1918, with the intention to live at the GWVA (veterans home) in Edmonton. Sadly John died on Armistice Day, 11 November 1918. He is buried at Lovett, Alberta, Canada. John was accepted for commemoration on Wednesday 20 June 2012, and at the end of 2014 a new headstone was erected for him at Lovett.

John Tyson Lloyd, Private, 435, Welsh Horse. John was the son of Peter and Ada Lloyd, of Parciau, Henllan Amgoed. He worked as a Groom for Dr. Thomas, at Hillside, Whitland prior to the war and enlisted at Cardiff on 10 September 1914 into the newly formed 1/1st Battalion, Welsh Horse Yeomanry. By early 1915 the Welsh Horse had moved to Diss, attached to the 1/1st North Midland Mounted Brigade, 1st Mounted Division. In September 1915 the Welsh Horse were dismounted and sailed from Liverpool in the S.S. Olympic on 25 September, and landed at Anzac Cove on 10 October 1915, joining the 54th Division as Pioneers. John was invalided with Gallipoli in November 1915 after taking ill, and was found to have contracted tuberculosis during the campaign. He was invalided to England, and sent to the Udal Torre Sanatorium at Yelverton, Devon for treatment. John was discharged from Udal Torre on 17 July 1916 and returned home, dying on 24 March 1917, aged 21. John's case was submitted to the CWGC on 4 May 2013, and he was accepted as a war casualty on Friday 25 July 2014. He will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance, but it is highly likely that he is buried in Henllan Amgoed.

 

Walter Everard Lloyd, Surgeon Lieutenant, Royal Navy. Walter was born on 7 December 1884, the youngest son of Dr. W. H. Lloyd of Llandilo. He was educated at the London Hospital, taking the diplomas of M.R.C.S. and L.R.C.P. London in 1908. Walter joined the Royal Navy on 5 November 1909, and at the beginning of the Great War was serving at Wei Hai Wei, the British Naval China Station Base. He was invalided home towards the end of the war, and died at Llandeilo on 20 March 1919, aged 34. Walter is buried at Llandilo Fawr (St Teilo) Churchyard. His case was sent in to the CWGC on 5 April 2013, and on Thursday 27 June 2013 Walter was officially accepted by them for commemoration, after 94 years of being forgotten.

Wymond Howard Lloyd, Second Lieutenant, Herefordshire Regiment. Wymond was born on 20 March 1883, the eldest son of Mr and Mrs H. Meuric Lloyd of Delfryn, Carmarthenshire. Wymond was educated at Malvern and New College, Oxford, where he had completed two years' residence, and was half way through his degree and studying for the Civil Service. He rowed for his college in the second eight, and was a member of the O.U.O.T.C., and so was commissioned into the Herefordshire Regiment as a Second Lieutenant in September 1914. Wymond embarked with his regiment to Gallipoli in August, 1915, and was five weeks at Suvla before contracting enteric fever and dysentery, which required his return home after many weeks in hospital. Upon his return, he was posted to Park Hall Camp, Oswestry, engaged on light duty and hoped to pass for active service at a medical board on 23 March, but on 18 March he was struck by a train while walking near the camp, and brought to Oswestry Cottage Hospital, where he died the following day, on 19 March 1916. He was 23 years of age, and was brought home to be buried with military honours in Llangadock Cemetery, on 23 March 1916. The Colonel commanding the Welsh Division Grouped Depots, T.F., wrote:- "Your son was a very fine young officer, and had gained the love and respect of all who came into contact with him, both in Gallipoli and here. I regret his loss personally, for I know what good work he was doing here in the training of the men." Wymond was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on 27 July 2007. Wymond's case was put forward to the CWGC by Dave Hanson.

James William Manning, Private, 277854, Royal Engineers. James was the son of John and Elizabeth Manning, of Webbs Hills, Walton West. He married Dorothy Ellen Collins at Haverfordwest in 1909, and the couple resided at 28, North Crescent, Haverfordwest. James had worked as a monumental mason at Haverfordwest prior to the war and after failing a military tribunal, enlisted on 8 May 1917 into the Royal Engineers. James was posted to the 488th Field Company, Royal Engineers in February 1918, but was discharged due to ill health on 28 October 1918. James died at Haverfordwest on 13 March 1919 aged 33. It is not presently known where James is buried, but his details were passed to the CWGC on 6 February 2013, and he has been accepted for commemoration on Friday 15 August 2014. His name will be added to the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the location of his grave can be found.

 

Domingo Mobile, Able Seaman, Mercantile Marine. Domingo was a Venezuelan who served with the Mercantile Marine aboard the S.S. Sofie, a London registered merchant steamer. On 2 February 1918 she was en route from Jersey to Cardiff in ballast when she was attacked in the Bristol Channel by the German submarine U-101. She was sunk by gunfire from the surfaced U-Boat with the loss of eight lives. Domingo was 39 years old when he died during the attack. His bullet-ridden body was discovered in a lifeboat which had washed ashore on Laugharne Sands, and he was buried in St. Martin's Churchyard, Laugharne on 13 February 1918. Domingo is currently commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London, but as a result of my research and the presentation of the evidence from myself to the CWGC on 4 May 2017 a Special Memorial was erected in the Churchyard.

Edwin Morgan, Able Seaman, 184874, Royal Navy. Edwin was born on 29 August 1877, the son of Henry and Ann Morgan, of 78, City Road, Haverfordwest. On his 18th birthday, on 29 August 1895, he enlisted into the Royal Navy for 12 years, and was posted to HMS Northampton. Over the following years he served aboard a multitude of ships, including HMS Revenge, Britannia, Majestic, Caesar and Minotaur, before completing his service on 29 August 1907. Edwin must have enjoyed life at sea, as he remained in the Royal Navy, and by the outbreak of war was back serving aboard HMS Britannia. He served at sea for a further two years during the war, but was discharged on 13 June 1916 after becoming ill, and was diagnosed with Pulmonary Tuberculosis. He died at Haverfordwest on 5 June 1917, aged 39, and was buried in St. Martin's Cemetery, Haverfordwest. Edwin's case was passed to the CWGC in August 2014, and he has been accepted for commemoration on Saturday 31 January 2015. His name will be added to the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the location of his grave has been verified by the CWGC.

 

Isaac Owen(s), Private, 2820, South Wales Borderers. Isaac was the son of Hugh and Ann Owen(s). The family was originally from Llangwyryfon, but by 1911 had moved to Gwynfryn House, New Road, Seven Sisters. Isaac married Minnie Turner, the daughter of George and Charlotte Turner, of Chirk, at Chirk in 1912. Isaac volunteered to serve with the Brecknock Battalion, South Wales Borderers and was posted to Pembroke Dock with their 2nd/1st Battalion soon after the outbreak of war. He became ill and died at Pembroke Military Hospital of TB on 23 September 1915, aged 24. Isaac has today, Tuesday 7 February 2017, been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. His last resting place is not currently known, so Isaac will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance.

Ismael Peregrine, Seaman, J77874, Royal Navy. Ismael was born at Pwll on 10 August 1899, the son of Evan and Catherine Peregrine. He served with the Royal Navy, but died of tuberculosis at Bay View, Pwll on 30 December 1918, aged 19. Ismael's grave has just been traced to Pwll (Bethlehem) Baptist Chapelyard, but I am presently trying to locate the burial registers, so that proof can be forwarded to the CWGC. Ismael has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Wednesday 28 November 2012, and his name will be added to the Addenda Panel of the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon, until proof of his burial can be found.

Thomas Arthur Edward Pugsley, Gunner, W/4968, Royal Field Artillery. Thomas was the son of James Parish and Mary Jane Pugsley, of 62, Avondale Street, Ynysboeth. He worked at Penrhiwceiber Colliery prior to enlisting at Mountain Ash into the 38th (Welsh) Division Artillery, and was posted to France with the division on 23 December 1915. He was wounded on the Somme in 1916, probably during the Mametz Wood assault, and was invalided to Aberdeen Hospital. He returned to France and was posted to Y/17th Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, which was attached to the 17th (Northern) Division. He re-joined the division in time to take part in the Battle of Arras, where the division helped captured Roeux. The division then moved north and took part in the First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. By March 1918 the Division was on the Somme, and came under attack during the German spring offensive, which was launched on 21 March 1918. The 17th Division was by then attached to V Corps of the Third Army and saw heavy fighting around Flesquières over the coming days. Thomas was killed in action during the retreat which followed, on 25 March 1918, aged 21. He has been forgotten for almost 100 years, until being accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Tuesday 23 January 2018. His name will be added to the Addenda Panel of the Arras Memorial, France.

 

Thomas David Rees, Private, 34190, South Lancashire Regiment. Thomas was the son of David and Elizabeth Rees, of 87 Cathays Terrace, Cardiff. He worked as a motor spirit store manager at Cardiff prior to enlisting in the city into the 20th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 10 December 1915. He remained on home service at Kinmel until being sent to France on 20 July 1916, and was posted to the 8th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment, which was attached to 75 Brigade, 25th Division. He joined the battalion on the Somme, and saw heavy fighting with the division throughout the offensive before being wounded on 29 August, when he was shot in the thigh. The division then moved to the Messines area, where it held the line for several months prior to the launching of the Battle of Messines. Thomas re-joined his battalion here after recovering from his wounds, but his health began to suffer from the strains of life in the trenches and he was sent home for treatment on 29 April 1917. He was sent to the 4th Northern General Hospital, where he was found to have contracted tuberculosis. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit and after a long period of suffering, died at 14, Merthyr Road, Whitchurch on 17 June 1918, aged 28. Thomas was buried in St. Mary’s Churchyard, Whitchurch, Cardiff. He was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research on Tuesday 6 March 1918. His name will be added to the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the location of his grave can be verified.

 

Benjamin Reynolds, Private, 41870, Royal Army Medical Corps. Benjamin was born in 1896, the son of William and Catherine Reynolds, of Wilcox Street, Solva. He was a school teacher prior to the war, and enlisted into the Royal Army Medical Corps at Haverfordwest on 18 October 1914. He served in France with 21 Casualty Clearing Station, RAMC from 26 November 1915 until 28 January 1916, when he was invalided home, suffering from Tuberculosis and Epididymitis. He was discharged from the army on 21 March 1916, and died on 28 May 1917, aged 21. His brother James was killed later that year. Benjamin was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Saturday 26 April 2014.

 

Ivor William Richards, Gunner, 200018, Royal Garrison Artillery. Ivor was the Husband of Mary Richards (nee Davies), of 13, Ralph Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Carmarthen on 13 March 1917, and served at home with the 1st Reserve Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Ivor was discharged on 13 August 1918 as medically unfit, due to suffering from tuberculosis. He died soon after, at 13, Ralph Street, on 11 October 1918, aged 19. Ivor is buried at Box Cemetery, Llanelli. Ivor was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Saturday 14 January 2012, and was commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance until the location of his grave was verified, and a new CWGC Portland headstone has recently been erected.

Herbert Gladstone Ridge, Sapper, 915, Royal Engineers. Herbert was born in 1886 in Chorlton, and was the son of Albert Ridge, who later resided at 5, Viney Street, Taunton, Somerset. The 1922 published Carmarthen County Roll of Honour lists Herbert as being from Llanybydder, but the 1911 Census shows him as residing at 36, Gilbert Road, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli on 24 July 1915 into the Welsh Field Company, Royal Engineers, and on 8 October 1915 joined his unit at Gallipoli. Herbert served at Gallipoli with his unit until it was evacuated in December 1915, then saw service in Egypt, before becoming ill, and returning to Britain on 2 October 1916. Herbert was discharged from the army on 20 December 1916 as a result of tuberculosis, and died at his sister's home at 5, Viney Street, Taunton on 18 March 1918, aged 31. Herbert is buried at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Taunton. Herbert was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Tuesday 17 January 2012 as a result of my research.

Llewelyn Owen Roberts, Private, 266516, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Llewelyn was the son of Hugh and Mary Roberts, of 1, David Street, Penmaenmawr. He was a quarry worker at Penmaenmawr prior to enlisting at Bangor on 14 March 1916 into the 6th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was stationed at Prestatyn when he became ill and was diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 2 May 1917 and died at home of phthisis pulmonalis on 27 February 1918, aged 22. He was buried in Penmaenmawr (Dwygyfylchi) Cemetery on 2 March 1918. His case was submitted to the CWGC on 5 December 2016 and he was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Wednesday 8 February 2017.

Edward Rockingham, Private, 320155, 24th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Edward was born at Norwood, Surrey. He became orphaned at an early age, and came to Abergwili, where he worked for Mrs. Rees, Penybont. He enlisted at Carmarthen into the Pembroke Yeomanry, Army Number 2237. The Pembroke Yeomanry moved to Egypt in 1916, where it merged with the Glamorgan Yeomanry to become the 24th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, part of 231 Brigade, 74th Yeomanry Division, and fought in Palestine as a dismounted infantry unit. Early in 1918 when the tide of war was turning in favour of the Germans, with big breakthroughs on the Somme and in Flanders, the 74th Division was sent back to France, landing during May, 1918. They were rushed to Flanders, where they helped stem the German advance, before moving south, pushing against the Hindenburg Line around the Épehy area. Edward was killed during heavy fighting at Gillemont Farm on 21 September 1918, during the Battle of Épehy. Edward has only recently been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC, after evidence of his omission was presented to them by myself. He will be commemorated on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial, France, after 91 years of being forgotten. Edward was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on 20 July 2009.

Ernest William Sherwood, Seaman, Royal Navy. Ernest was born in 1898, the son of Wyndham Henry and Lelia French Sherwood, of 3, Talbot Street, Llanelli. He volunteered to serve with the Mercantile Marine, and gained an apprenticeship aboard the sailing barque Inveramsay. On 27 April 1917 Inveramsay was sailing from Glufport for Freeland with a cargo of pine when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-62, with the loss of all her crew. Ernest was just 18 years old. He has today, 9 April 2014, been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC, who will be adding his name to the Tower Hill Memorial, London. His brother Arthur also fell. (Ernest’s case was put forward to the CWGC by the IFCP, not by myself, but has been added here due to his west Wales origins).

Daniel Thomas Smart, Corporal, 204810, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Daniel was born in Penrhiwceiber in 1891, the son of Frederick and Martha Smart. The family later resided in 17, Philip Street, Barry Dock, where Daniel worked as a Pilot. He worked at Hull for a short time before the war, and whilst there met Eliza De Marion Dent and the couple married on 24 November 1913. He enlisted on 11 January 1915 into the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, a newly formed cavalry unit, with the service number 673. He served at home until being released for civilian service on 21 March 1916 and on 9 June 1917 was recalled to the colours, being posted as Corporal to the 17th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He served in France with the battalion and saw action with the 38th (Welsh) Division at Pilckem Ridge and Langemarck but took ill while the division was stationed near Armentieres in April 1918. He was hospitalised and was discharged as medically unfit on 28 July 1918, suffering from suppurative appendicitis. Daniel sadly succumbed to the disease at Barry Hospital on 20 December 1918 aged 27. He was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Friday 22 April 2016 and will be commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance. Work continues to attempt to trace his grave.

Dan Thomas, Private, 203471, Welsh Regiment. Dan was born at Eglwysfair-Y-Churig around 1884, the son of James and Hannah Thomas, Tailor and Draper, of Parky Llain Isha, Eglwysfair. He resided at Penybryn, Cross Hands prior to the war, with his wife Gwenllian Thomas, and he worked as a Stoker at the Cross Hands Colliery. Dan enlisted at Llanelli into the 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 87 Brigade, 22nd Division. The Division crossed to France in early September 1915, with all units being concentrated near Flesselles by 9 September, but after just two months in the trenches, were sent to Salonika, completing concentration there in November 1915. The Division then remained in the Salonika theatre, where it fought a wretched campaign against the Bulgarians. Dan was killed in action during the Second Battle of Doiran on 18 September 1918. He was 35 years old. Dan has been forgotten for almost 94 years, but after forwarding evidence about him to the CWGC in January 2012, Dan has today, Tuesday 22 March 2012, been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC, who will be adding his name to the Addenda Panel of the Doiran Memorial, Greece. The reason for Dan being forgotten is relatively simple, as on the same day another Private D. Thomas in the same Battalion was killed. This man was Private David Thomas, of Bangor, North Wales, and his number was 203441, very similar to Dan's.

David Thomas, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. David was born on 29 May 1893, the son of John and Mary Ann Thomas, of Tegfan, Cross Inn, Synod Inn. He served with the Merchant Navy aboard the SS Treglisson, a 2,512 tonne cargo steamer. At the outbreak of war, Treglisson was detained by the Germans at Bremen and used as a prison ship between 1914 and 1919, her crew being interned in Ruhleben Prisoner of War camp in Germany for the duration. After the war, she was returned to her owners. David died of blood poisoning in the Lazarette, Ruhleben on 27 May 1917, aged 23, and is buried in Ruhleben, Germany. Thanks to Emyr Langley for the details and the photos of David. David appears to have been recently accepted for commemoration by the CWGC and will be commemorated on the Cologne Memorial, Germany.

David George Thomas, Private, 44386, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of John and Sarah Ann Thomas, of 29, Plymouth Street, Swansea. He had served with the 3rd Volunteer Battalion, Welsh Regiment prior to the war, and on 8 December 1915 enlisted at Swansea into the army. On 9 February 1916 he was posted to the 21st Battalion, Welsh Regiment, before being posted to France on 9 July 1916, joining the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. David served on the Somme for a month, but was gassed and invalided home on 13 August 1916. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 8 September 1916, and died at 29, Plymouth Street, Swansea on 19 February 1917, aged 25. David was buried with full military honours at Swansea (Danygraig) Cemetery. He was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Thursday 12 February 2015 following evidence sent in by myself.

Sydney Thomas, Private, 5340, Welsh Regiment. Sydney was born at Llanelli in 1888, and was the husband of Hannah Jane Thomas, of 52, Wern Road, Llanelli. He was a tin-worker prior to enlisting at Llanelli into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 9 November 1914. Sydney was posted to the 4th Welsh base at Hearson Camp, and by the summer of 1915 had began to feel the effects of active service. Sydney was discharged from the army due to a heart condition on 14 October 1916, and returned to Llanelli, where he died on 5 November 1918, aged 30, leaving his wife with three young children. Sydney's case was put forward to the CWGC on 4 August 2013, and he was accepted for commemoration on Saturday 27 September 2014. He was temporarily commemorated in the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance at Maidenhead until the location of his grave was traced to Llanelli and District (Box) Cemetery, and a new CWGC Portland headstone has recently been erected.

Charles Archibald Walters, Gunner, 371208, Royal Garrison Artillery. Charles was born in Neyland in 1896, the son of Arthur and Minnie Walters. At some time after 1911 the family moved to 70, Harbour Village, Goodwick, where Charles took up work on a farm. He enlisted at Stack Rock Fort into the Pembroke Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery on 16 January 1915. Two months later, he was posted to 114 Siege Battery, and served in France from 14 June 1916. After almost a year on the Western Front, Charles became ill, and returned to England. He then spent two more years on home service, before being discharged from the army due to ill health on 12 May 1919, and was awarded a war pension. He died on 4 April 1920, aged 24, and was buried at Llanwnda Cemetery, Goodwick on 8 April 1920. Charles was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Saturday 26 April 2014 and a new CWGC headstone has recently been installed.

Henry Thompson White, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Henry was the son of John Davies White and Lucy Thompson White, Chemists, of Guildhall Square, Carmarthen, and was the brother-in-law of the Vicar of Llangunnor. He worked for the London and County Bank in London as a Bank Clerk prior to the war, and married Kathleen Marion Vereker in London on 16 August 1911. Henry enlisted into the 19th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. On 6 April 1915 Henry was commissioned into the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and was then posted to the 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 84 Brigade, 28th Division. On 28 September the 1st Welsh launched an attack at Loos against the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Henry was wounded during the fighting, and after a brief spell in hospital was posted to the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 3 Brigade, 1st Division. The division was by then on the Somme, and was caught up in heavy fighting around High Wood and Munster Alley. On 8 September 1916 the 2nd Welsh moved through Munster Alley towards High Wood, where 3 Brigade had been tasked with the capture of the wood. The Welsh lost heavily in the attack, with seven officers and 66 other ranks killed or missing. Henry was among the officers posted as missing during the assault on High Wood that day, and was 37 years old. For some strange reason, he is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel! As of today (28 August 2013) the CWGC have accepted my evidence that Henry was wrongly commemorated, and his name will be added to the new France 1914-1918 Memorial when it is built.

Ernest Evan Williams, Private, 372305, Royal Army Medical Corps. Ernest was the son of Evan and Mary Ann Williams, of 49, South Park Street, Pembroke Dock. He worked as a Schoolmaster at Pembroke Dock prior to the war. Ernest enlisted at Cardiff on 25 October 1915 into the Royal Army Medical Corps, and was attached to the 3rd Western General Hospital at Cardiff. By 21 May 1917 Ernest had become too ill to work, and was struck off the strength of the RAMC, his papers showing that he had caught an infection during his service. Ernest was treated in a Sanatorium for the next year, sadly dying of pulmonary tuberculosis on 23 June 1918, at Newport Hospital, Gwent. Ernest was 26 years old, and is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery. Ernest was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Saturday 26 April 2014.

Joshua Williams, Private, 633812, London Regiment. Joshua was born in November 1886, and worked as a Draper, residing at Ty Coch, White Square, Taliaris, Llandilo. Joshua enlisted on 18 November 1915 into the 15th Battalion, London Regiment, and on 5 July 1916, he embarked with the Battalion for France, where he transferred to the 20th Battalion, London Regiment, attached to 141 Brigade, 47th (London) Division. The Division fought on the Somme that year, through the Battles of Flers-Courcelette and Le Transloy, where they captured Eaucourt L'Abbe, and attacked the Butte de Warlencourt. Joshua took ill after these actions, and was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Boulogne with influenza. On 2 November 1916 he returned to England, and spent the next few months at the 2nd General Eastern Hospital, Brighton. Joshua was discharged from the army on 26 June 1917, owing to ill health, and was transferred to Beechwood House Hospital, Newport, where he sadly died on 17 September 1917, suffering from Cardiac Failure. He is buried at Taliaris (Holy Trinity) Churchyard. Joshua was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on 27 May 2011. Joshua's case was put forward to the CWGC by Dave Hanson.

Percy Griffin Williams, Private, 813, Welsh Horse Yeomanry. Percy was born at Newent, Gloucester in 1886, the son of William Williams. He married Minnie Florence Howley at Oxenhall on 6 February 1907. Percy enlisted at Gloucester into the Welsh Horse Yeomanry on 23 January 1915 and served with their reserve battalion until being diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis and being discharged as medically unfit on 26 March 1917. He returned home, but died of tuberculosis at Culver Street, Newent on 13 February 1919, aged 32. Percy was buried in Oxenhall Churchyard. His case was submitted to the CWGC on 5 January 2016 and Percy was accepted for commemoration by the CWGC on Wednesday 23 November 1916.

The Great War, 1914-1918. Submitted to the CWGC.

 

This section contains the details of the cases of un-commemorated men which are currently under review by the team at the National Army Museum. As soon as I receive any updates, then they will be moved to the relevant section and the information updated.

Lord George Atkins, Sergeant, 240047, Welsh Regiment. Lord went by his middle name of George and was the son of Thomas and Fanny Atkins, of Swansea. The family had moved to 97, Coedpenmaen Road, Pontypridd prior to the war. George worked as a miner prior to the war and had served with the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Militia) before he re-enlisted at Pontypridd into the 5th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Territorials) on 4 May 1908. George married Margaret Stock at Llanwonno on 25 February 1913. He attended annual camp every year up until the outbreak of war and on 16 July 1915 embarked with the battalion for service at Gallipoli with the 53rd (Welsh) Division. He was wounded at Gallipoli on 19 August 1915 and came back to the 2nd Southern General Hospital at Bristol for treatment. He remained on home service after recovering from his wound but became ill and was hospitalised again on 15 November 1916 and found to be suffering from sarcoma of the testes. George was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 8 February 1917 and returned home to his wife before dying at 28, Tel el Kebir Road, Pontypridd on 26 March 1917, aged 25. George is buried in Glyntaff Cemetery, Pontypridd. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Samuel Brooks, Private, 11925, Devonshire Regiment. Samuel was born on 27 January 1885, the son of Samuel and Rebecca Brooks, of 95. Foxhole Road, Swansea. He worked at Swansea Docks prior to enlisting into the Royal Navy on 5 October 1903 and over the coming years served mostly on shore bases before being discharged in May 1907. He returned to Swansea and married Ellen Williams there on 13 May 1911. By the time war erupted the couple had two daughters and Samuel enlisted at Swansea into the 3rd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment on 10 September 1914. On 9 February 1915 he was posted to France to join the 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment, which was attached to 23 Brigade, 8th Division. The division had recently arrived in France after being formed using battalions brought back from service around the Empire and would see its first major action during the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, which raged from 10 to 13 March 1915. It then took part in the Battle of Aubers Ridge on 9 May 1915. Samuel was badly wounded at Aubers Ridge after being shot in the leg and the shoulder. He returned home for lengthy hospital treatment and died at Swansea Hospital on 15 March 1919 aged 32, of pneumonia and influenza which had been accelerated due to his wounds. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Thomas Leslie Foster Brough, Private, DM2/130455, Army Service Corps. Thomas was born in Cumberland on 19 March 1900, the son of John Robert and Mary Brough. By 1911 the family had moved to 37, The Highway, Pontypool Road, Pontypool. Thomas worked at Baldwin’s Steel Works prior to enlisting Pontypool into the Army Service Corps on 18 October 1915. He was posted to France to join the BEF on 4 January 1916 and served overseas until 4 February 1917 when he returned to England and he remained on home service until being discharged as medically unfit on 10 September 1918 after having been diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. He died at home at Panteg on 15 March 1919, aged 18. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Archibald Casswell, Rifleman, 40560, Worcestershire Regiment. Archibald was the son of William and Janet Casswell, of 44, Trafalgar Terrace, Swansea. He worked on the clerical staff of the Midland Railway prior to enlisting at Swansea into the Monmouthshire Regiment on 17 November 1915. He landed in France on 14 September 1916 and was posted to the 7th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, which was attached to 144 Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division. He fought on the Somme that summer but on 27 December 1916 returned to England after falling ill and being diagnosed as suffering from heart disease. Archibald was hospitalised for a while and died at 10, Gwendolen Road, Leicester on 7 July 1918, aged 35. His body was brought home to Swansea for burial in Danygraig Cemetery. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Richard Charles, Private, 2996, Welsh Regiment. Richard was the son of Joseph and Mary Ann Charles, of 1, Jenkins Court, Union Street, Neath. He worked as a collier prior to enlisting at Swansea into the 6th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 25 January 1915. He was posted to Bedford for training but was discharged as medically unfit on 29 January 1916 after having been diagnosed with tuberculosis and returned to Neath. Richard died at 57, Union Road, Neath on 13 July 1918, aged 29. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Sidney Coker, Private, MS/4006, Army Service Corps. Sidney was the son of George and Margaret Coker, of 41, Brunswick Street, Swansea. He worked as a mechanic prior to enlisting at Swansea into the Army Service Corps on 28 September 1914 and was posted to the Depot at Bulford for training as a driver. Sidney served at home for almost four years before being discharged from the army as medically unfit after being found to be suffering from heart problems. He died at 157, King Edward Road, Swansea on 26 September 1919, aged 36. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Richard Cook, Private, 1810, South Wales Borderers. Richard was from Cinderford. He worked as a miner prior to enlisting at Brecon into the 5th Battalion, South Wales Borderers on 16 October 1914, which became the Pioneer Battalion to the 19th (Western) Division. On 17 July 1915 he landed in France with the battalion, which proceeded to the Givenchy sector, north of Loos. On 25 September 1915 the division took part in a futile attack, intended to divert German attention away from the offensive to the south at Loos, but suffered terrible casualties without making any gains. On 22 December 1915 Richard was sent back to England after falling ill and he was discharged as medically unfit on 19 February 1916, after being diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. He died at 14, Norman Street, Caerleon on 17 January 1918, aged 25. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Sam Cooper, Private, 30613, Royal Field Artillery. Sam was the son of John and Hannah Cooper, of Trevethin, Monmouthshire. He married Mary Ann Hughes in 1894 and the couple raised six children at their home in 8, Morgan Street, Abertillery. Sam was an army reservist with eight years’ service with the South Wales Borderers and had then worked as a collier for many years prior to the war and enlisted at Newport into the Royal Field Artillery on 5 September 1914. He was posted to the Depot at Preston for training before landing in France on 6 October 1915, serving with the 10th Division Ammunition Column and then the 56th Division Ammunition Column. He became ill soon after the division was posted to the Somme sector and was discharged as medically unfit on 18 June 1916 after being diagnosed as suffering from heart disease. He returned home and died at 8, Morgan Street, Abertillery on 10 January 1917, aged 53. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Rees Davies, Private, 8275, Grenadier Guards. Rees was born on 14 August 1877, the son of Edwin Davies, of 8, George Street, Seaside, Llanelli. He had served with the 1st Volunteer Company, Welch regiment prior to enlisting in Cardiff into the 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards on 14 September 1899. Rees served with the Grenadier Guards in South Africa during the Boer War until returning home on 7 October 1902, and was still serving in August 1914 when war erupted. By then he had married Emily Mary Lanman, a domestic servant, at Llanelli on 20 February 1913, and Emily set up the family home at 20, Copperwork Road, Llanelli, where their two sons were born. Rees embarked for France with the Grenadier Guards on 4 November 1914, seeing action during the First Battle of Ypres. On 3 February 1915 Rees was invalided home after being wounded at Neuve Chapelle, and remained on home service until being discharged as medically unfit on 2 May 1917. He died at the Lunatic Asylum in Carmarthen on 4 May 1918, aged 41. Rees's case has just been put forward to the CWGC on 4 August 2013.

 

Godfrey Dorey, Private, 62453, South Lancashire Regiment. Godfrey was born on 8 March 1885, the son of William James Dorey and Mary Dorey (nee Thomas), of Neath. He worked as a mason at the Cape Copper Works and married the widowed Catherine Ann Howells at Neath in 1908. Godfrey enlisted at Neath into the South Lancashire Regiment on 8 March 1915 and was posted to their 15th (Transport) Battalion, on home service in the Mersey Docks. Godfrey served on the Mersey for three years before his health began to break down and he was discharged from the army as physically unfit on 8 March 1918 due to bronchitis and emphysema. Godfrey died at 33, Wind Street, Neath on 24 March 1918, aged 33, leaving his widow, a step-daughter and two sons. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

George Henry Downer, Company Sergeant Major, 3074, Royal Garrison Artillery. George was born in Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight in 1859, the son of Charles and Ann Downer. He originally enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery at Landport on 12 June 1877 and during his years with the colours spent much of his career in India, where he met and married Agnes Emily Dyer on 31 March 1890. Over the coming years Agnes bore George seven children, while he served around the empire, in Afghanistan, Burma and Egypt. After completing his service George moved his family to Swansea after being transferred to the Glamorgan Royal Garrison Artillery on 16 November 1890. He re-enlisted at Swansea into the Royal Garrison Artillery on 1 October 1914 and was posted to No 3 Depot, RGA. He served on home defence until being discharged from the army on 20 June 1918 after falling ill and being diagnosed as suffering from a urethral fistula and returned to Swansea. George died in Swansea Hospital on 24 February 1919, aged 60. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Dan Oscar Evans, Corporal, 27005, Royal Army Medical Corps. Dan was born in Ystrad in 1885, the son of John and Mary Ann Evans. He worked as an electrician and was one of the founder members of the St. John’s Ambulance Brigade at Ystrad prior to enlisting into the Royal Army Medical Corps at Pembroke on 24 September 1914. Dan was promoted to Corporal within six months of enlisting but after just a year of serving became ill and was discharged as medically unfit on 30 September 1915 after being diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. He died at 12, William Street, Ystrad, Rhondda on 30 January 1918, aged 32. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Daniel Evans, Private, 11668, Welsh Regiment. Daniel was the Husband of Margaret Evans, of Tanygraig Cottage, Pontyberem. He enlisted at Carmarthen on 18 August 1914 into the 8th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, and saw action in Gallipoli, before being wounded on 8 August 1915, when he was shot in the foot, and returned to Britain. Daniel was at Kinmel Park until 10 August 1916, when he was posted to the 2nd Welsh in France. He was transferred to the 9th Welsh until 19 December 1916, when he became attached to the Base Depot at Etaples. Daniel was posted to the 14th Welsh on 8 August 1918, which was preparing for its assault across the River Ancre on 21 August. Daniel was wounded again on 7 September 1918, within weeks of the offensive starting, and was discharged from the army as unfit on 29 January 1919. He suffered badly from his wounds after the war, and died as a result on 12 April 1921, aged 33. The location of Daniel's grave has not yet been identified. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

David Christmas Evans, Private, 4220, London Regiment. David was born in London, the son of David and Anne Evans. His parents were from Cwmann and the family had returned home prior to 1911, living at Cilgell Isaf Farm. David then returned to London and was living at 90, Blackfriars Road, Lambeth when he enlisted on 9 June 1915 into the 3rd/21st Battalion, London Regiment. He deserted the battalion after spending some time in hospital some weeks later and received 28 days detention as a result. Re-joining the battalion after his release, he was posted to France and on 10 July 1916 embarked at Southampton to join the 1st/2nd Battalion, London Regiment on the Somme. Within a week his health began to break down and David was admitted to the 16th General Hospital at Le Treport after being diagnosed with pleurisy. He returned to England on 2 August where he was diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 31 August 1916. David spent some time at the West Wales Sanatorium at Llanybydder before being discharged and sent home. He died of pthisis at Cilgell Isaf on 8 May 1918, aged 20 with his aunt Letitia Williams by his bedside. David is not commemorated by the CWGC, but is commemorated on his parents grave at Lampeter and on the Cwmann War Memorial. His details have just been forwarded to the CWGC in order to get him properly commemorated as a casualty of the Great War.

 

John Garvin, Private, 11737, South Wales Borderers. John was born at Abersychan in 1876, the son of William and Mary Garvin. He married Ada Williams at Pontypool on 1 April 1899 and the couple lived in 62, High Street, Pontypool. John worked as a collier and had served with the Royal Monmouth Royal Engineers (Territorials) prior to enlisting into the 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers at Brecon on 10 August 1914. He was initially posted to the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers and embarked for France on 13 September 1914, joining the battalion after it had withdrawn from Mons to the Marne, with 3 Brigade, 1st Division. He was wounded at Ypres on 9 November 1914 and returned home before being posted to the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers, joining the battalion at Gallipoli on 10 May 1915. He was wounded again in Gallipoli and returned home on 7 August 1915 after treatment at hospital in Giza. As well as being wounded twice, John’s papers show that he had begun to suffer from ill-health and was discharged as medically unfit on 3 July 1916 after having been found to have contracted tuberculosis. John returned home and died in 62, High Street, Pontypool on 30 September 1916, aged 40, leaving his widow and seven children. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

Thomas William George, Corporal, 6758, Royal Engineers. Thomas was born in Swansea in 1884, the son of Daniel and Harriett George. He married Mary Ellen Heffron in Swansea on 24 August 1907 and the couple lived in 37, Dyfatty Street, Swansea. Thomas worked as a labourer prior to enlisting at Swansea into the Royal Engineers on 22 August 1914 and was posted to the Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers. He was posted to France on 13 December 1914 and served with the unit on the Western Front until being taken ill on 22 July 1915 and was diagnosed as suffering from nephritis. He returned home for treatment at the 1st London General Hospital for several months and returned home after being discharged from the army as medically unfit on 8 May 1916. Thomas died at 14, Caebricks Road, Cwmbwrla on 15 November 1916, aged 32. His brother Emin Stanley Jones and Mary’s brother, Thomas James Heffron were killed in 1915. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

David Evan Gough, Private, 206079, London Regiment. David was born at Tirphil in 1900, the son of George and Mary Gough, of 23, Railway Terrace, Tirphil. He worked as a collier prior to enlisting into the army and was called up on 10 April 1918, joining the Territorial Force Cyclists Depot. On 15 November 1918, four days after the armistice, he was posted to the 1st Reserve Battalion, London Regiment at Aldershot, but soon became ill and was hospitalised there. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 15 January 1919 after having been diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. David died at 23, Railway Terrace, Tirphil on 8 May 1919, aged 18. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Stanley Griffiths, Private, 2252, Welsh Regiment. Stanley was the son of David and Sarah Ann Griffiths, of 50, Iorwerth Street, Swansea. He worked as a labourer prior to enlisting at Swansea into the 6th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 10 August 1914. He was posted to France on 7 February 1915, joining the 1st/6th Welsh, which was serving alongside the 2nd Welsh with the 1st Division. Stanley took part in the divisions assault at the Battle of Loos, which opened on 25 September 1915 and saw both battalions suffer terrible casualties. The division wintered near Loos, and Stanley was shot in the chest here while at work digging trenches on 6 January 1916. He was evacuated home for treatment, but was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 3 October 1916 after having been found to have also contracted tuberculosis. Stanley died at 50, Iorwerth Street on 4 June 1917, aged 20. He was buried with full military honours in Cwmgelly Cemetery, Swansea. His brother, David Daniel Griffiths, had been killed during the opening day of the Battle of the Somme in 1916. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Edward Jenkin Gulliford, Private, 19963, South Wales Borderers. Edward was born on 31 May 1884, the son of George and Elizabeth Gulliford, of 13, Chapel Row, Blaenavon. He worked as a colliery haulier prior to enlisting at Newport into the South Wales Borderers on 31 May 1915. He embarked at Devonport to join the MEF on 16 October 1915 and joined the 4th Battalion, South Wales Borderers at Gallipoli. He was evacuated from Gallipoli on 14 December 1915 after contracting dysentery and was taken aboard the Hospital Ship Soudan, which took him to Malta. Edward was treated at St. George’s Hospital and was sent back to England to recuperate. Edward was then posted to France and embarked at Marseilles on 1 November 1916 to join the 8th Battalion, South Wales Borderers in Salonika. He joined the battalion on 13 November, but within weeks had taken ill again and was sent to the 29th Stationary Hospital, Salonika before being transferred back to St. George’s Hospital in Malta. Edward was then taken aboard the Hospital Ship Goorkha, which set sail from Malta for England on 10 October 1917 but struck a mine and sank, luckily without loss of life. Edward was taken back to Malta before being sent to England aboard the Hospital Ship Wandilla and he was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 20 February 1918 after being diagnosed as suffering from spinal caries. He died at the Pontypool and District Hospital, Abersychan on 21 June 1918, aged 35 and was buried with full military honours in St. Peter’s Churchyard, Blaenavon. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Thomas John Hale, Private, 34342, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was the son of Samuel and Mary Lizzie Hale, of 30, Marion Street, Newport. He worked as a dock labourer prior to enlisting at Newport into the South Wales Borderers on 15 September 1915. He was initially posted to the 14th Battalion, South Wales Borderers at Prees Heath before being posted to the 12th Battalion, South Wales Borderers on 2 November 1915. The battalion was attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division and landed in France in June 1916. He was tried by FGCM in France for refusing to obey an order by a superior officer and was awarded 3 months Field Punishment No 1 by the tribunal. He served throughout the battalions time in France, taking part in its famous action at Bourlon Wood. The battalion was disbanded on 10 February 1918 and Thomas was transferred to the 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. He became ill soon afterwards and was sent back to England and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 16 August 1918 after being diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. Thomas died at 30, Marion Street, Newport on 6 September 1919, aged 32. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Ivor John Hiley, Gunner, 164946, Royal Field Artillery. Ivor was the son of James and Elizabeth Hiley, of 6, Barry Road, Cadoxton. He ran his own drapery business at Ebbw Vale prior to the war and married Maud Williams in 1912.The couples only child, Mollie, was born in the family home at 41, Wern Road, Sebastopol in 1914 prior to Ivor enlisting into the Royal Field Artillery. Ivor was posted to France in 1916 and joined the 63rd Division Ammunition Column, which was attached to the famous 63rd (Royal Naval) Division. He took part in the divisions offensive on the Ancre, during the latter stages of the Somme offensive in 1916 and the following year took part in its actions during the Battle of Arras and the Third Battle of Ypres. He survived the war and came home on leave after the armistice but became ill and came down with pneumonia. Sadly, while he was in his sick bed, his wife and daughter died of pneumonia on 1 December 1918. Ivor himself died at Sebastopol on 16 December 1918 aged 33. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Thomas John Hodson, Sergeant, 8621, South Wales Borderers. Thomas was the son of George and Margaret Hodson, of Brecon. He married Gladys Evangeline Webster at Brecon on 25 August 1912. Thomas served at the Depot in Brecon and died there of tuberculosis on 4 July 1916, aged 30. He was buried with full military honours at Brecon (St. David) Churchyard. His case was submitted to the CWGC in January 2016 as a result of my research.

 

William Arthur Hopkins, Private, 41944, Royal Army Medical Corps. William was the son of John and Elizabeth Hopkins, of Talywain, Monmouthshire. He married Clara Williams at Pontypool in 1897 and the couple had three children over the coming years, in their home at 7, Edward Street, Conway Road, Pontypool. William worked as a haulier prior to enlisting at Newport into the Royal Army Medical Corps on 19 October 1914 and on 16 February 1915 embarked for France to join the BEF, joining the 4th Division and served with No 12 Field Ambulance. He served continuously in France until being admitted to the 1st Canadian Casualty Clearing Station on 30 April 1918 where he was found to have lost his memory and be suffering from dementia due to the stress of military service. On 4 May 1918 he returned to England aboard the Hospital Ship Pieter de Coninck and was discharged from the army as physically unfit on 21 August 1918. He died at Abergavenny Lunatic Asylum on 27 May 1920, aged 44. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

William Henry Hopkins, Private, 13301, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. William was born in Swansea in 1893, the son of William and Hannah Hopkins. By 1911 the family was living at 15, Trebanog Road, Cymmer. William worked as a coal miner prior to enlisting at Tonypandy into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 2 September 1914 and initially joined the 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. He was then transferred to the 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and landed in France on 27 September 1915, joining the battalion in Flanders. Within weeks, on 1 December 1915, William was admitted to hospital at Bethune after becoming ill and was diagnosed as suffering from valvular heart disease. He was sent to Étretat, where he remained for three weeks before being sent to the 2nd Western General Hospital at Manchester. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 25 July 1916 and returned home. William died of heart disease at 144A Trebanog Road, Cymmer on 16 October 1918, aged 24. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

Sam Hughes, Second Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. Sam was the son of Isaac and Selina Hughes, of Bagillt. He trained as a solicitor and was articled to Jagger & Clement Jones, of Wrexham and lived with his brother, Isaac Newton Hughes, at 53, Erddig Road. He enlisted as Private into the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and landed in France on 2 December 1915, serving at Mametz Wood the following year. On 24 January 1917 Sam was commissioned into the Welsh Regiment and was posted to the 10th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. Sam served at Pilckem Ridge with the battalion and remained with it when the division moved to a quieter sector on the Lys to rebuild after its ordeals. Early in the morning of 6 November 1917 the battalion was in the front line in the Boutillerie sector. Sam was sent out on patrol with eight men when they were fired upon by German machine-gun fire. Hughes was killed and two of his men wounded and got lost in the darkness. They were brought back in at 7 a.m. on the following morning by a party led by Sgt James [33247] of ‘D’ Company, and ten men. Sergeant James and Private Edgar Lewis were awarded the Military Medal for this act. According to the CWGC records, Sam Hughes has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial. The author was on one of many battlefield tours around France five years ago when he stumbled across the grave of an unknown officer of the Welsh Regiment, with the date 5 November 1917, in Pont-du-Hem Military Cemetery, La Gorgue, Plot 4, Row D, Grave 2. Research was carried out to see who this officer could be, and it can only be one man, Sam Hughes, of Wrexham. The evidence was gathered together to prove this and, despite being turned down once, the CWGC have finally agreed that Hughes is the man buried in this grave and have passed the case onto the MoD for consideration. If they decide in favour, then Sam Hughes will finally get the named grave that he deserves.

David Humphreys, Gunner, 30296, Royal Field Artillery. David was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys, of Pontymoile, Pontypool. He worked as coal hewer prior to the war and enlisted at Newport into the Royal Field Artillery on 4 September 1914, stating previous service with the Panteg Battery, Royal Field Artillery. He served with the 26th Reserve Battery until being posted to France on 12 May 1915, joining the 96th Battery, RFA. On 11 January 1916 he was posted to B Battery, 81st Brigade, RFA and in May joined D Battery, 79th Brigade, RFA. David served throughout the Somme offensive of 1916 and on 30 October 1917 was struck in the head by a shell fragment while his battery was at Ypres. After a spell in hospital David was discharged from the army as physically unfit on 18 January 1918 due to having a fractured skull. He returned home and died at 43, Front Street, Pontymoile on 5 January 1919, aged 38. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Edward James, Private, 38576, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Edward was the brother of Mrs Ellen Smith, of 4, Crindau Road, Newport. He worked as a haulier prior to enlisting at Newport into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 17 November 1914. He was posted to the 2nd (Garrison) Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 17 December 1915 and embarked for Egypt with the battalion on 6 March 1916. Edward was serving in Egypt when he became ill and was diagnosed as suffering from pleurisy in May 1916. He struggled with his health afterwards and was hospitalised and diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis, so was sent back to England on 5 December 1916, to attend a sanatorium. Edward returned to Newport to live with his sister and died at her home at 4, Crindau Road on 21 October 1917, aged 38. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

David Morgan Jenkins, Private, 213156, Royal Engineers. David was the son of Margaret Jenkins, of 77, Carmarthen Road, Swansea. He married Margaretta Brace at Llanelli on 26 September 1908 and the couple lived at 1, Waunwen Road, Swansea. David worked as a carpenter before enlisting at Swansea into the Royal Engineers on 30 November 1915, stating that he had previously served with the 7th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Cyclists). He remained on home service with the 1/3rd Glamorgan Electric Lighting Company, Royal Engineers for the duration of the war and was discharged from Chatham on 18 January 1918

After falling ill and being diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. He returned home and died at 1, Waunwen Road on 22 January 1918, aged 37. His burial service was held on the following Saturday. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Evan Ivor Isaac Jenkins, Private, 5174, Welsh Regiment. Evan was the son of Isaac John Jenkins and Mary Jane Jenkins (nee Treharne), of Hillston House, 1, Clifton Terrace, Box, Llanelli. He worked as a boiler maker prior to enlisting at Llanelli into the 4th (Reserve) Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 29 October 1914. He served with the battalion at Pembroke until being transferred to the 3rd/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment at Milford Haven on 9 November 1915. Evan became ill whilst stationed at Hearson Camp and was discharged from the army as physically unfit on 22 August 1916 after having been diagnosed as having contracted diabetes mellitus. He returned home and died at 48, Alban Road, Llanelli on 4 March 1918, aged 20. Evan is buried in the old section of Llanelli District Cemetery. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

David Jenkin Jones, Private, 26567, Welsh Regiment. David was the son of David and Catherine Jones, of 14, Exhibition Row, Llwydcoed. He worked as a coal miner prior to enlisting at Aberdare into the Welsh Regiment on 25 November 1914. He was posted to the Rhondda Battalion and trained at Porthcawl before going to Rhyl where he transferred to the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Carmarthen Pals). He did not move to Winchester with the battalion but remained at Kinmel Park with the 21st Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He became ill at Kinmel Park and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 9 March 1916 after being diagnosed as suffering from diabetes mellitus. He returned home and died at 11, Exhibition Row, Aberdare on 4 May 1918, aged 31. David was buried in Aberdare Cemetery. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

David Thomas Jones, Driver, 29983, Royal Field Artillery. David was born in 1880, the son of Mary Ann Jones, and had served in the Boer War of 1899-1902. Upon returning home he trained as a French Polisher, and lodged at Tybie Villa, Llandybie. He married Elizabeth Gwilt at Abermule on 6 May 1905. David served in France with the 37 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, with the BEF, from August 1914 and was discharged on 23 February 1916 after being gassed and was sent to Alltamynydd Sanatorium at Llanybydder for treatment. He died of tuberculosis at his Aunt’s home at Dryslwyn on 5 July 1918, aged 38. He was buried with full military honours in Llandeilo Fawr Parish Churchyard. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Tudor Emlyn Jones, Rifleman, S/2072, Rifle Brigade. Tudor was born at Mardy on 21 December 1892, the son of Thomas Evan Jones and Elizabeth Jones. The family later moved to 56, Byng Terrace, Brynhyfryd, Swansea. Tudor worked as an engine fitter prior to enlisting at Swansea into the 11th Battalion, Rifle Brigade on 7 September 1914. The battalion was attached to 59 Brigade, 20th (Light) Division and Tudor landed in France with the battalion on 21 July 1915. The division moved to the Fleurbaix Sector for trench familiarisation and training. When the Battle of Loos was launched on 25 September 1915 the Division fought a diversionary attack towards Fromelles. Later that year they moved north, and fought at the Battle of Mount Sorrel alongside the Canadian Corps. Tudor became ill at Ypres and was evacuated to hospital on 13 February 1916, after complaining of having bad legs and an unquenching thirst. He was diagnosed as suffering from diabetes mellitus and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 23 May 1916. He died at 56, Byng Terrace, Brynhyfryd on 30 March 1917, aged 24 and was buried with full military honours in Cwmgelly Cemetery, Swansea. His brother, David Charles Jones, served with the same regiment and was killed at Ypres on 12 February 1916. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

William Jones, Private, 2565, Welsh Guards. William was the son of Evan and Elizabeth Jones, of 9, Wellington Terrace, Rhyl. He worked as a butcher’s assistant prior to enlisting at Caterham into the Welsh Guards on 24 January 1916. He embarked at Southampton for France on 4 October 1916 and joined up with the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards at Ypres. After two months in the sodden Flanders trenches, William was hospitalised with trench feet. He re-joined the battalion on 9 December 1916. After a week back in the trenches William took ill and was hospitalised with pleurisy. He was sent back to the Ontario Hospital, Orpington, Kent, where he was diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. And was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 9 April 1917. He died at West Street, Rhyl on 14 July 1918, aged 21. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

William John Jones, Private, 266570, Monmouthshire Regiment. William was from Abercarn. He married Florence Mabel Butland on 9 October 1913 and the couple resided at 7, Francis Street, Bargoed, where their two daughters were born. He worked as a collier before enlisting at Bargoed on 1 September 1914 into the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He was only in uniform for four weeks when he was discharged as medically unfit on 2 October 1914. Un-deterred he re-enlisted at Bargoed on 12 December 1915 into the 2nd/2nd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment. William landed in France on 11 January 1917 and was posted to the 1st/2nd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment. He was only in France for two months before his health began breaking down and he was sent back to England on 24 March 1917. William was discharged from the army on 27 June 1917 after having been diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis and died at Mardy Hospital, Merthyr on 3 June 1918, aged 26. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Thomas John Joseph, Private, 27123, Welsh Regiment. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Mary Ann Joseph, of 50, Cwmbath Road, Morriston. He married Catherine Buckland at Swansea on 23 October 1910 and the couple had three children over the coming years. Thomas worked as a labourer prior to enlisting at Swansea into the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 21 January 1915. On 22 April 1915 he was posted to France with the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment but within a month went missing near L’Epinette on 9 May 1915 during the Battle of Aubers Ridge. He was found to be trapped in a shell-hole, wounded in the arm and was invalided to hospital at Boulogne before being sent back to England, and after a long spell in hospital was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 15 August 1916 after being diagnosed as suffering from heart disease. He died at 54, Cwmbath Road, Morriston on 17 June 1919, aged 35. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

John Walker Keen, Private, 17273, Welsh Regiment. John was born in Hackney on 31 May 1875, the son of Alfred Keen. He married Delina Lane in St. Saviour’s Church, Hoxton on 21 May 1894 and had served with the London Territorials, Royal Engineers around the turn of the century, seeing service in the Boer War. John and Delina moved to 18, Ynisdarren Road, Ystalyfera prior to 1905 and John worked as a painter. He enlisted at Swansea on 5 October 1914 into the 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Swansea Pals), which trained at Rhyl and Winchester before landing in France on 2 December 1915 attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. Within weeks John had been promoted to Sergeant, but only held the rank for a month before being reduced to Private through being found drunk on duty. He took part in the divisions assault on Mametz Wood in July 1916 but by January 1917 had been transferred to the Depot at Cardiff after his health had begun to fail. On 25 February 1917 John was discharged from the army as medically unfit after being diagnosed as suffering from heart disease and he died at home at Ystalyfera on 26 December 1917, aged 42. His wife, Delina had left him sat by the fire and returned home to find him dead in the chair. John was buried in St. David’s Church Burial Ground at Ystalyfera. He is not presently commemorated by the CWGC, but I have recently sent evidence off to the CWGC to attempt to get him commemorated as a war casualty. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Jenkin Robert Lewis, Private, 28839, Welsh Regiment. Jenkin was the son of David and Catherine Lewis, of 4, Portia Terrace, Swansea. His father was a tailor and was originally from Pendine. Jenkin worked as a shop assistant prior to enlisting at Swansea into the 18th Battalion, Welsh Regiment at Swansea on 12 June 1915. The battalion was a Bantam unit, attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division and Jenkin landed in France with the battalion on 2 June 1916. Jenkin was not in France long as he took ill within months of landing and was evacuated to hospital in October 1916. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 20 November 1916 after being diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis and returned to Swansea to live with his sister, Elizabeth Jane Hasquencort. He died of tuberculosis at her home at 66, St. Helen’s Road on 17 May 1918, aged 27. On the following month Jack Davies, a former hairdresser at Hasquencort’s barbers, was killed in France. Jenkin’s case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

William Henry Lippitt, Corporal, 60223, Welsh Regiment. William was born on 13 July 1898, the son of George James Lippitt and Margaret Ann Lippitt (nee Crockett), of Rowan's Villa, Aberbeeg. He was studying to be a schoolteacher when he enlisted at Cardiff on 23 June 1917 into the Welsh Regiment and was posted to the 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to the Tees Garrison at Redcar. Soon after enlisting William became ill. He was sent to Redcar Military Hospital for treatment but was found to have contracted tuberculosis and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 16 February 1918. William returned home to 23, High Street, Llanhilleth, where he died of tuberculosis on 6 July 1918, aged 19. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Evelyn Lovelock, Private, 60170, Cheshire Regiment. Evelyn was the son of Thomas and Sarah Ann Lovelock, of Northop, Flintshire. He worked as a coal miner prior to the war and lived with his wife Edith Lovelock (nee Bassett) at 5, Charles Street, Mold. Evelyn enlisted at Flint Castle on 7 October 1914 into the 5th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and was posted to Egypt on 11 February 1916, joining the 1st/5th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division and joined the battalion at Khatatbat. On 27 November he was admitted to hospital with flat feet and spent some time at the 26th Stationary Hospital, Ismailia before being transferred to the 2nd Garrison Battalion, Cheshire Regiment. He served in Egypt until 1 June 1917 when he was again hospitalised after taking ill and was at first diagnosed as suffering from bronchitis. On 17 August 1918 Evelyn was sent home aboard the Hospital Ship Formosat and was admitted to the Tooting Military Hospital where he was diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. Evelyn was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 9 November 1917 and returned home to 82, Wrexham Street, Mold, where he died of tuberculosis on 3 January 1918, aged 30. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Edward Marsden, Private, 29032, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Edward was born in Birkenhead in about 1874. He was an army pensioner, and married Mary Jane Williams, of 12, Colwyn Terrace, Old Colwyn at some time around the turn of the century. He re-enlisted at Llandudno into the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 9 April 1915, but due to his age was instead posted to Egypt to join the 2nd Garrison Battalion, RWF. He served in Egypt until being invalided to England on 30 May 1916 and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 23 October 1916 after having become ill and was temporarily paralysed. Edward died at Old Colwyn on 22 November 1918, aged 44. His death cannot be traced by the General Registry Office for a death certificate to be bought, so presently Edward will have to remain un-commemorated. Oddly he cannot be traced in the census or birth, marriage and death records, but all his army papers confirm these details.

 

William Henry Morris, Sergeant, 2789, Royal Field Artillery. William was born at Maesteg in 1879, the son of Morris and Elizabeth Morris. He resided with his sister Elizabeth and her husband Owen Phillips, at 23, Quay Street, Ammanford prior to the war, working as a collier in one of the local mines. He enlisted at Ammanford into the Royal Field Artillery on 1 September 1914 and was posted to France with C/65th Battery, Royal Field Artillery on 30 May 1915. On 20 January 1916 William was posted to the Mediterranean, but after six months there he returned home ill. William was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 15 August 1916. He died on 15 July 1919, aged 41, as a result of illness brought on by his war service. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Jerome O’Leary, Rifleman, 1789, Monmouthshire Regiment. Jerome, who was also known as Jeremiah, was the son of Michael and Kate O’Leary, of Albion House, Albion Square, Chepstow. He worked as a painter prior to enlisting at Chepstow into the Monmouthshire Regiment on 15 January 1914. Jerome served at home for just under a year before his health deteriorated and he was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 14 January 1915 after having been diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis. He suffered for years with his health before dying of tuberculosis at 14, Welsh Street, Chepstow on 31 May 1919, aged 24. An elder brother, Timothy, was killed in 1915 while another brother, William Michael O’Leary also served and died in 1915 but is not commemorated by the CWGC. Jerome’s case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research, while Michael’s papers do not show his death to be service related.

 

William Price, Private, 8477, South Wales Borderers. William was the son of James and Elizabeth Price, of Abergavenny. He lived with his brother James at 8, Regent Street, Abergavenny prior to enlisting into the South Wales Borderers on 17 July 1904. He served with both the 1st and 2nd Battalions during the coming years, seeing service in India, South Africa and China, where he took part in the famous landing of the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers at Lao Shan Bay in September 1914. He then took part in the battalions landing on Gallipoli on 25 April 1915 and on 8 May 1915 was shot in the back. He was hospitalised at Intarfa Hospital at Malta before being posted to Valetta Hospital, where he worked for several months before taking ill and returning to England on 24 November 1916 aboard the Hospital Ship Dover Castle. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 8 January 1917 after having been diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis and returned home before being sent to Beechwood House, Hospital at Newport, where he died of tuberculosis on 13 October 1917, aged 31. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Patrick Shea, Guardsman, 1783, Irish Guards. Patrick was born in Churchill, County Kerry in 1882. He had served with the Irish Guards for several years prior to joining the Swansea Police Force as PC121 in March 1908. He was recalled to the colours on 4 August 1914 and landed in France with the Irish Guards on 13 August 1914, taking part in the Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat to the Marne. He took part in the First Battle of Ypres and was wounded there on 29 October 1915 and was initially reported missing. He was found to have been shot in the side and was evacuated to hospital in Boulogne and after recovering from his wounds remained at Boulogne, where he was attached to No 2 Sanitary Section. In August 1916 he was posted back to his battalion, which was by then on the Somme attached to the Guards Division, but by October 1916 was back in hospital. Patrick survived the war but his health had taken a turn for the worse and after being diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis he was sent to Bath War Hospital after the armistice. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 18 January 1919 and returned to Swansea, dying in the arms of his brother John at 107, Terrace Road, Swansea on 10 May 1919, aged 37. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Samuel Frank Starr, Corporal, 23426, South Wales Borderers. Samuel was born in Frome in 1884, the son of Samuel and Eliza Starr. By 1911 the family had moved to Wales and lived at 22 Glebe Street, Newport, Mon. Samuel worked as a dock labourer prior to enlisting at Newport on 7 April 1915 into the 12th Battalion, South Wales Borderers. The battalion was a Bantam Battalion, attached to 119 Brigade, 40th (Bantam) Division and he landed in France with the battalion on 1 June 1916. Samuel took ill soon after the division moved to the Somme sector and was invalided home to the War Hospital at Guildford on 22 November 1916 after being diagnosed as suffering from heart disease. Samuel was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 13 March 1917 and returned home. He died at 22, Globe Street, Newport of valvular cardiac disease on 19 February 1919, aged 35. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

William Charles Taylor, Private, 532518, Labour Corps. William was the son of Henry Albert Taylor and Emma Taylor, of 17 River Place, Twerton, Bath. He worked as a warehouseman prior to enlisting at Bath into the Somerset Light Infantry on 12 January 1916. He was mobilised on 10 April 1917 and posted to the Durham Light Infantry on 14 July 1917. On 9 March 1918 he was transferred to the 597th Home Service Employment Company, Labour Corps. He took ill soon afterwards and was hospitalised at Warley Military Hospital, where he was diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 27 June 1918. He returned home and died at Winsley Sanatorium on 15 September 1918, aged 24. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Robert Pendrill Thomas, Third Engineer, Mercantile Marine. Robert was the son of Robert and Hannah Thomas, of 4, Thomas Street, Pontardawe. Robert served as an engineer with the Mercantile Marine and was serving as Third Engineer aboard the London registered steamship SS Bayronto. On 30 July 1918 Bayronto was steaming past the Isle of Wight, when she was attacked and torpedoed by the German submarine UB-88. Robert and one other crew-member were killed in the explosion, but Bayronto survived, limping home for repairs. Officially Robert, who was 30 years old, has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London, but two obituaries were published at the time in local newspapers which stated that his body was brought home for burial in St. Samlet’s Churchyard, Llansamlet at 5.00 pm on 12 August 1918. I have located copies of the burial register proving this and have recently (26 February 1918) forwarded the evidence to the CWGC. Bayronto later foundered in heavy seas during a Hurricane on 13 September 1919.

 

William Griffith Thomas, Private, 1463, Royal Army Medical Corps. William was the son of Rowland Henry Thomas and Emily Thomas, of 72, Norfolk Street, Swansea. He worked as a joiner prior to enlisting at Swansea into the Royal Army Medical Corps on 29 March 1912 and served with the Welsh Field Ambulance (Territorials). He attended every annual camp from then onwards and upon the outbreak of war joined the 3rd Welsh Field Ambulance. He was posted to Coddenham in Suffolk soon afterwards, but contracted pneumonia in November and was hospitalised for a while. His health worsened and William was diagnosed with tuberculosis and as a result was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 29 April 1915. He returned home and died of tuberculosis at 136, Carmarthen Road, Cwmbwrla on 2 March 1919, aged 28. He was buried in St. John’s Churchyard, Clydach. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Oliver Watkins, Private, 131326, Royal Engineers. Oliver was born in Nailsea, Somerset on 26 July 1870, the son of Robert and Ellen Watkins. By 1891 he had moved to Radyr where he worked as a stone mason and married Eleanor Powell at Radyr Parish Church on 12 January 1891. He enlisted at Cardiff into the Royal Engineers on 27 September 1915 and was posted to Chatham. He was posted to France with the 87th Field Company, Royal Engineers and was stationed at Vermelles when a shell burst near his billets on 10 May 1916. Obviously suffering from shock, on the following morning he developed dizziness and a headache and had uncontrollable diarrhoea and vomiting. He then began to suffer from a range of ailments and was diagnosed as suffering from myocardial disease. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 5 July 1916 and returned home, dying of pneumonia and cardiac failure at 3, Main Road, Morganstown, Radyr on 24 October 1917, aged 47. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Percy Alyn Watts, Private, 2495, Cheshire Regiment. Percy was born at 5, Victoria Terrace, Mold in 1890, the son of James and Clara Watts. By 1911 he was living with his widowed mother at 14 Alderson Road, Liverpool and worked as a merchants clerk. He enlisted at Chester into the 5th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment on 21 October 1914. The battalion landed in France on 15 February 1915 and became attached to 14 Brigade, 5th Division. After just three months in the trenches, Percy became ill and was sent back to England where he was diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis whilst at camp in Oswestry in November 1915. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 25 February 1916 and returned home. He died of tuberculosis at 14, Alderson Road, Wavertree on 30 October 1916, aged 26. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Thomas Wilcock, Private, 3594, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas was born at Buckley, Flintshire, the son of James and Jane Wilcock. The family later lived at Fern Bank, Northop Hall, Flintshire. Thomas enlisted at Queensferry into the 3rd/5th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 7 December 1915 and on 26 June 1916 was posted to Egypt to join the 1st/5th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to the 53rd (Welsh) Division. He served in Egypt for less than three months before taking ill and on 5 September 1916 was sent back to England, going to Wandsworth Military Hospital. He was diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 28 September 1916. He returned home to Fern Bank where he died of tuberculosis on 6 February 1917, aged 21. Thomas was buried in St. Matthew’s Churchyard, Buckley on 10 February 1917. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

William Williams, Private, 15891, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. William was the son of William and Dorothy Williams, of 25 Hill Street, Cefn Mawr, Ruabon. He worked as a coal miner prior to enlisting at Wrexham into the North Wales Pals Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 2 October 1914. The battalion later became the 13th (1st North Wales) Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and trained at Rhyl before moving to Winchester as part of 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division and landed in France on 1 December 1915. The division moved to the Fleurbaix sector for trench initiation before taking over a section of the front near Cuinchy which it held until marching south to the Somme in June 1916. On 7 July 1916 the division launched its first assault on Mametz Wood but was repulsed at heavy cost and re-organised before attacking again on 10 July, capturing the wood after two days of heavy fighting. William survived Mametz Wood but soon began falling ill and was diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis of the spine and sent to Glasgow Royal Infirmary for treatment. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 8 October 1916 and returned home, dying at the Isolation Hospital, Groesynyd, Llangelynin, Conway on 22 December 1916, aged 23. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

 

Albert Thomas Willmington, Private, 7411, Devonshire Regiment. Albert was born in Martock, Somerset on 20 January 1885, the son of William John Willmington and Alice Elizabeth Willmington. By 1901 the family had moved to Wales and in 1911 was living in 7 High Street, Brynsadler. Albert worked as an insurance agent prior to the war and enlisted at Pontypridd on 11 September 1914 into the Devonshire Regiment. He was posted to the 3rd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment and on 18 October 1914 was posted to their 2nd Battalion, which embarked for France as part of 23 Brigade, 8th Division on 4 November 1914 to join the BEF at Ypres, taking over a section of the line at Messines. The battalion suffered a hard first winter in the trenches near Neuve Chapelle and in December captured the Moated Grange. On 10 March the battalion suffered heavy casualties during an attack against the German trenches and in May 1915 took part in the Battle of Aubers Ridge. During December 1915 Albert came home on leave and on 20 December 1915 married Ellen Newman at Llantrisant. The battalion was still in the same sector when Albert re-joined it but over the winter his health began to break down in January 1916 when he began suffering giddy spells. He was diagnosed as suffering from valvular heart disease and on 16 March 1916 he was sent back to England and on 12 July 1916 was discharged from the army as medically unfit. He returned home and died at 7, High Street, Brynsadler on 7 October 1918, aged 32. His case has recently been forwarded to the CWGC as a result of my research.

The Great War, 1914-1918. Presently being researched/ Illegible

 

The cases on this page are of local men who appear to have died as a result of their military service but are not commemorated by the CWGC as war casualties. I am in the process of attempting to gather information and evidence relating to their war service and death, in an attempt to get them commemorated, but sadly most of these will impossible cases to prove.

 

Arthur Thomas Brace, Seaman, M25849, Royal Navy. Arthur was born at Stanford, Berkshire on 20 September 1893, the son of Eleanor Brace. He was a Fitter’s Apprentice at Pembroke Dockyard prior to the war, before enlisting into the Royal Navy. Arthur survived the war, but died at Pembroke on 20 September 1921, aged 28. Arthur was buried at Pembroke (Monkton) Cemetery.

 

William George Bowen, Sapper, 908, Royal Engineers. William was residing at 34, Penygroes Street, Llanelli when he enlisted in April 1915 into the 3rd/1st Welsh Field Company, Royal Engineers. He was discharged from the army on 4 June 1915 as being deemed unlikely to become an efficient soldier.

 

Patrick Joseph Brett, Private, 901, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Patrick was born in Sligo in 1876, the son of Catherine Brett. He had served with the West Riding Regiment and with the Royal Irish Fusiliers after enlisting at Bradford in 1893 and served for ten years, seeing action during the Boer War, before joining the army reserve and moved with his wife Harriett and their two daughters to 7, Chester Street, Flint. He re-enlisted there on 23 May 1911 into the 5th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and attended annual camp with the battalion at Pembroke later that year. Patrick served continuously with the 5th RWF before being discharged as medically unfit on 6 October 1914. He died less than a fortnight later, on 22 October 1914, aged 38 and was buried with full military honours in Flint. His widow Harriett married Bernard Stewart, who was killed in France 29 September 1917. Patrick is illegible for commemoration because his illness cannot be proved to have originated due to his military service.

 

Frederick James Bunt, Driver, 47949, Royal Garrison Artillery. Frederick was born at the Defensible Barracks, Pembroke Dock in 1892, the son of Sidney and Annie Elizabeth Bunt (nee Gravett). His father was originally from Gosport, Hampshire, and served with the Royal Artillery at Pembroke Dock, where he had married Annie in 1883. Fred followed in his father's footsteps, and enlisted on 29 August 1907 into the Royal Artillery at Pembroke Dock. On 4 November 1911 he married Annie Maria Cotton, at Newport, Isle of Wight. By the outbreak of the Great War, Fred was stationed at Gosport, where he was attached to No. 33 Company, Royal Garrison Artillery. He served at the Gibraltar Garrison from 27 December 1914, until 15 September 1915, before returning to Gosport, where he was discharged from the Royal Artillery on 15 October 1915 for misconduct. He possibly died of wounds in France on 7 July 1918, but is not commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, so nothing further has yet been traced.

 

Rhys Brynach Davies, Private, 28828, South Wales Borderers. Rhys was the son of Walter and Anne Davies, of Solva, and the husband of Florence Louisa Davies, of The Ship Hotel, Solva. He looks to have served with the 4th Battalion, South Wales Borderers in Mesopotamia during the war. Rhys died in November 1922, aged 44, and was buried at Solva/ Whitchurch on 5 November 1922, too late to be officially commemorated by the CWGC.

 

William Lloyd Davies, Wheeler, T4/060246, Royal Army Service Corps. William was born in 1888, the son of John and Rachel Davies, of 2, Mill Street, Newcastle Emlyn. He served with the 12th Divisional Ammunition Column, Army Service Corps during the war, after landing with his unit at Boulogne on 30 May 1915. The Division saw much action during the course of the war, fighting at Loos in September 1915, then on the Somme the following year. During 1917 it took part in the Battle of Arras and the Battle of Cambrai, and during the final year of the war saw heavy fighting on the Somme during the German offensive of March 1918, before participating in the great offensive, which ultimately won the war. William survived all of this, but was gassed during the latter stages of the war. On 17 April 1919 he was demobilised, and returned to Newcastle Emlyn, where he died on 23 February 1920, aged 32, as a result of his gassing. William is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

George Lawrence Evans, Private, South African Infantry. George was born in 1884, the son of William and Margaret Evans, of Cenarth. He had left Wales to work as an electrical engineer at the Rose Deep Gold Mine in South Africa several years prior to the war, and in August 1914 enlisted into the South African Infantry. He served in East Africa with a Motor Cycle Unit of the South African Infantry during the war, but his service took a heavy toll on his health, and he returned to South Africa after the armistice. George died at Johannesburg in the summer of 1918, and was buried there with full military honours. He is not commemorated as a war casualty by the CWGC.

 

William Davies Evans, Sergeant, 4190, South African Infantry. William was born in Montgomery in 1878, the son of George Evans, later of Tenby Cottage, Usk, and had resided at Pontardulais at some time, probably marrying Alice Ellen of Pontardulais in 1895. He was a regular soldier, having served for eight years with the 11th Hussars, and for over five years with the 6th Dragoon Guards, seeing service in India and during the Boer War, before emigrating with his family to South Africa, where he bought a farm. He re-enlisted in South Africa in September 1915, joining the 1st South African Infantry. William served in France with the South Africans, and was badly wounded at Delville Wood in August 1916. He was sent to the Base Hospital at Rouen for treatment, and after five months recovering rejoined his unit, only to be wounded again, returning to Rouen in November 1917, where he spent another seven months. William then had problems with severe abscesses, probably due to his wounds, and was invalided to South Africa, where he could only walk with crutches, and developed a bad cough. He was awarded a generous pension in 1921, but must have died soon after, as his list of conditions was pretty long, and he was still hospitalised at Port Elizabeth in February 1921. Nothing else is known of him.

 

Benjamin James Hanbury, Private, 49782, Welsh Regiment. Benjamin was the Son of Benjamin and Emily Hanbury, of 81, James Street, Llanelli. He enlisted at Llanelli into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. Benjamin was discharged Category E on 14 October 1919, and died during the last Quarter of 1920, aged 27.

 

Alfred Blencowe Gray, Seaman, Mercantile Marine. Alfred was born at Neyland in 1891, the son of William Thompson Gray and Bessie Gray, of Marine Villa. William was a Station Master at Neyland, and prior to his death in 1909 moved his family to Glanymor, Goodwick, where Bessie ran a Boarding House. Alfred served his apprenticeship at Trinity House, and later served with the Mercantile Marine, aboard the SS Glengyle. Alfred survived the sinking of the Glengyle by the German Submarine U34 on 1 January 1916. He survived the war, but died in Pembrokeshire on 14 May 1919, aged 28 and is buried in Manorowen Churchyard, near Fishguard. Nothing more is presently known of him, so further research is ongoing, but I cannot find enough evidence to attempt to get him commemorated by the CWGC as a war casualty.

Charles Henry Hardwick, Driver, 39843, Royal Field Artillery. Charles was the son of Alice Hardwick, of Handsworth, Staffordshire. Prior to the war he lived at Pembroke, and married Sarah Jane Lewis, of East End, Pembroke, in 1917. Charles served with the 42nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery during the war, which was attached to the 12th (Eastern) Division. He survived the war, but died on 1 March 1919 as a result of his war service. He was 35 years old, and was buried at Pembroke (St. Michael's) Churchyard on 5 March 1919.

 

William J. Harries, Private, 200091, Welsh Regiment. William served with the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was the local Territorial Battalion, attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on 9 August 1915, and was immediately thrown into action, spending the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair, and then at the Attack on Scimitar Hill. The Division remained here throughout the coming months, and suffered severe losses in manpower strength during the great November 1915 blizzard on Gallipoli, when its total strength was reduced to less than that of a full-strength Brigade. On 11 December 1915 the Division was evacuated to Mudros, and by 23 December 1915 were moved to Egypt. They remained on the Suez Canal Defences for the next twelve months, where it took part in operations against the Sultan of Darfur, and in March 1917 took part in the advance into Palestine. He was discharged, Category E, on 28 April 1919, and is one of two men of that name who died in Llanelli in 1920.

 

Francis Arthur Howard, Trumpeter, 20823, Lancashire Regiment. Frank was the son of Arthur and Annie Howard, of Pen Y Llan Street, Overton, Ellesmere. He served with the Lancashire Regiment during the war and died of meningitis on 24 January 1919, aged 18. He was buried in Overton Cemetery.

Robert Brython Jones, Royal Army Medical Corps. Robert was born in 1893, the son of William Jones, of 14, Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. He served during the war with the 131st Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, which served in France attached to the 38th (Welsh) Division. Robert didn't embark for France with his unit, as he was discharged as medically unfit on 28 September 1915 after having taken ill at Winchester. He died at Aberystwyth of tuberculosis on 1 December 1918, probably as a result of his military service, and was buried in Aberystwyth Cemetery.

Edward Lucien Laws, Trooper, 501, East African Mounted Rifles. Edward was born in Tenby in 1876, the son of Edward and Georgina Elizabeth Laws (nee Nantes), of Brython, Tenby. His father was the son of Admiral John Milligen Laws, and had been High Sheriff of Pembrokeshire from 1899. Edward was educated at St. Andrews College, Bradfield, and resided at Brython, Tenby prior to the war. Edward was a businessman, and was declared bankrupt on 29 March 1909. He joined the East African Mounted Rifles, but took ill on active service, and died at Mombasa on 7 September 1916. Edward was 39 years old. He is probably buried at Mombasa (Mbaraki) Cemetery, but is not commemorated by the CWGC, so this cannot be verified.

 

James Law, Private, Welsh Regiment. James was the Son of David and Mary Law, of Bynea. Not much is presently known about him, but he is buried with his parents and sister at Box Cemetery, Llanelli. The headstone is worn, but shows that he died on 20 August 1918, aged 20, and had served with the 4th Welsh.

 

John Henry Lawrence, Able Seaman, Royal Naval Reserve. John was born on 17 February 1895, the son of Thomas and Sarah Lawrence, of 19, St. Peter’s Road, Milford Haven and was the nephew of Sarah Jane Jenkins, of Summerhill, Letterston. He enlisted into the Royal Naval Reserve on 21 January 1915 and served until being discharged on medical grounds in August 1916. He died at home in Milford Haven of tuberculosis on 4 April 1917, aged 22 and is buried in Milford Haven Cemetery. John is deemed as not being eligible for commemoration by the CWGC as there is not enough detail on his service papers to link his death to his military service.

 

Ben Lloyd, Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. Ben was the husband of Margaret Lloyd, of 10, Treherbert, Cwmann. Very little can be found about Ben, but he had served in the Royal Garrison Artillery. He survived the war, but died on 28 April 1919, aged 50. Ben was buried at Pencarreg on 1 May 1919.

 

Edward Marsden, Private, 29032, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Edward was an army pensioner, and was the husband of Mary Jane Marsden, of 12, Colwyn Terrace, Old Colwyn. He re-enlisted at Llandudno into the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 9 April 1915, but due to his age was instead posted to Egypt to join the 2nd Garrison Battalion, RWF. He served in Egypt until being invalided to England on 30 May 1916 and was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 23 October 1916 after having become ill and was temporarily paralysed. Edward died at Old Colwyn on 22 November 1918, aged 44. His death cannot be traced by the General Registry Office for a death certificate to be bought, so presently Edward will have to remain un-commemorated.

 

Edward Morris Morgan, Sapper, 563293, Royal Engineers. Edward was the son of John Morgan, of 6, Holyland Road, Pembroke. Edward worked as a Teacher at Sydenham, Kent prior to the war, and resided at 46, Wiverton Road, Sydenham. Edward served during the war with the Royal Engineers. He was discharged in January 1919 as unfit for further service, and died on 23 March 1921, aged 41. Edward is buried at Pembroke (St. Michael's) Churchyard.

 

William Henry Morris, Sergeant, 2789, Royal Field Artillery. William was born at Maesteg in  1879, the son of Morris and Elizabeth Morris. He resided with his sister Elizabeth and her husband Owen Phillips, at 23, Quay Street, Ammanford prior to the war, working as a collier in one of the local mines. He enlisted at Ammanford into the Royal Field Artillery on 1 September 1914 and was posted to France with C/65th Battery, Royal Field Artillery on 30 May 1915. On 20 January 1916 William was posted to the Mediterranean, but after six months there he returned home ill. William was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 15 August 1916. He looks to have died on 15 July 1919 as a result of illness brought on by his war service.

 

Percival Alf Nicholls, Shipwright, 343493, Royal Navy. Percival was born in 1885, the Son of James and Rosa Nicholls, of The Green, Pembroke. He served with the Royal Navy during the Great War, aboard HMS Albion, a Canopus Class pre-dreadnought battleship. Albion had served at Gallipoli, where her guns were used to support the landings, and remained in the Mediterranean for the remainder of the war. Little else is known about him as yet, but Percival died sometime in 1920, at the age of 35.

 

William Hordern Norris, Private. Very little is known of Hordern, but he was born in Middlesex in 1899, the son of John F. Norris a railway porter of Deal, Kent and Elizabeth Green of Llanelli, the daughter of Joseph and Harriet Green of 16, Gilbert Place, Llanelli, who he was residing with by 1901. He is also commemorated on the Great Western Railway Memorial, and is listed as being based in the Engineering Department at Pantyffynon. He possibly died in West Ham in 1920, aged 21.

 

John Plankinton Pelling, Captain, Royal Army Service Corps. John was born at Birkenhead in 1884, the son of Thomas and Jessie Pelling. Thomas was a successful Fruit Merchant. John was educated at Trent College, Long Eaton, and was commissioned into the Army Service Corps on 13 March 1915. John was Mentioned in Despatches during his time at war, and after the Armistice married Mabel I. Thompson in Wirral in March 1919. Mabel was the family’s sick nurse prior to the war. John died at Wareston, Cosheston on 17 February 1920, aged 35.

 

Howard Joseph Preece. Howard was born in 1894, the Son of Sarah Preece, of 11, Kingsbridge, Pembroke. Little is presently known of him, but he died during November 1915, aged 21, and was buried at Pembroke (St. Michael) Cemetery on 1 December 1915.

 

Sir Edward John Wesley Parry Pryse (Bart), Major, Welsh Regiment. Sir Edward was the Husband of Nina Katherine Angharad Webley-Parry, of Noyadd Trefawr, Cardiganshire, who he had married in November 1891. He was  a Justice of the Peace, and at the outbreak of war, already a long serving officer with the 41st Welsh Regiment, was posted to the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment as a Major. Sir Edward died at Gogerddan late on 20 October 1918, aged 56.

 

William Oliver Rees, Private, 40262, Welsh Regiment. There is no trace of William, except on the 1911 Census, where he is shown as having been born at Trelech, and being a Boarder at Cloth Hall, Carmarthen. A medal card exists which shows a Private William O. Rees, army number 40262, serving with the Welsh. He looks to have died in 1919, aged 25.

 

Henry Riggs, Warrant Officer. Henry was probably the son of Henry and Henrietta Riggs, of Owermoigne, Dorset. The War Memorial at Caio states that Henry resided at Llystroyddyn, Caio. Little else is presently known about Henry, but he looks to have been a shepherd, like his father, and probably served with an Agricultural Company of the Labour Corps, probably being based at Caio. He died at Weymouth early in 1919, aged 29, and was buried on 15 February 1919 at Owermoigne, Dorset.

 

Phillip Taylor, Stoker, Royal Naval Transport Section. Phillip resided at 29, Stanley Street, New Dock, Llanelli. He served in the Royal Navy, and was Mentioned in Despatches for his work during the Gallipoli landings on 25 April 1915. He died at Llanelli late in 1922, aged 39.

 

David Howell Thomas, Private, 4089, 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. David was born in 1888, the son of William Thomas, of Cordingly, Priory Street, Cardigan. He worked as a Collier at Tumble prior to the war, and enlisted at Tumble in April 1913 into the 4th Welsh. David was embodied at the East Blockhouse, in Pembrokeshire, at the outbreak of war, and embarked with the battalion for Gallipoli on 16 July 1915, where it landed on 8 August 1915 as part of the 53rd Welsh Division. On 19 November David was shot in the right foot by a Turkish sniper. He returned via hospital ship to Britain to convalesce, and afterwards began working at the Pembrey Munitions Works. He died at Burry Port of influenza and pneumonia on 3 November 1918, aged 30.

 

Evan Owen Thomas, Private, 24392, Welsh Regiment. Evan was the Son of John and Betsy Thomas, of Brynteg, Adpar, Newcastle Emlyn. He served with the 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was raised as the Cardiff City battalion, and trained at Rhyl. Evan looks to have been discharged as unfit for overseas service on 12 July 1915, several months before the 16th Welsh moved to France. He died on 16 April 1920, aged 29.

 

Herbert Nugent Thomas, Private, 315828, Welsh Regiment. Herbert was born in Cardiff in 1887, and resided at 32, Westbourne Road, Penarth. He served during the war with the Glamorgan Yeomanry, and was with the battalion in Egypt when it merged with the Pembroke Yeomanry early in 1916, to become the 24th battalion, Welsh Regiment. Herbert was probably invalided home at some time, and was serving with the Army Service Corps, prior to being demobilised. He died at 52, Westbourne Villas, Hove, Sussex on 25 March 1920, aged 32.

 

Charles Webb, Sapper, 125214, Royal Engineers. Charles was born in 1895. He worked as a Coalminer, and lived at 7, Cambrian Place, Pontardulais with Emily Yelling. He enlisted into the Royal Engineers on 19 October 1915, and moved to France ten days later, joining the 11th Labour Battalion, RE. Charles served on the Western Front until 25 January 1919, when he was demobbed and returned home. He was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis soon after, and was awarded a pension of 40 shillings. Charles died at Newport, Monmouth early in 1922, aged 47.

 

Aled Williams, Wireless Operator, Royal Navy. Aled was born in Patagonia, the son of Mr J. S. Williams. The family was originally from Carmarthen, and in May 1912 moved back to the town, buying Merlin Lodge. Aled and his brother Elfed enlisted into the Royal Navy at the outbreak of war, and both trained as Wireless Operators. Aled served for two and a half years aboard a hospital ship, but returned to Carmarthen after his health broke down. He died at home on 12 February 1918, aged 21, and was buried in Nantgaredig Methodist Chapelyard. Aled is not commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Nelson Stanley John Worsell, Private, S/8351, Rifle Brigade. John was born at Beckenham, Kent on 16 August 1889, the son of John and Jessie Worsell. He married Lily Chapman at Llanelli in 1910, and the couple had a son, Leonard Worsell. John served with the Rifle Brigade, and landed in France on 15 June 1915. He survived the war, and returned to Llanelli, but Lily sadly died before he was demobilised. John remarried, Edith M. Knight during the summer of 1919. He died at Parc Howard Hospital, Llanelli on 8 September 1920, aged 31. Nothing further is presently known of him, as he is not commemorated by the CWGC.

The Great War, 1914-1918. Rejected cases.

 

Over the last few years, several cases which I have attempted to present to the CWGC, wither directly myself, or through the ‘In From the Cold Project’, have been rejected for varying reasons, mostly lack of evidence. Some died outside the qualifying dates, even though their deaths were related to their war service. Even though these men have been rejected for official commemoration, this page of the website serves to commemorate their memory.

 

Francis George Banwell, Private, 20815, Welsh Regiment. Francis (known as George) was born at Aberavon in 1895, the son of Francis and Julia Banwell. The family later resided at 15, High Street, Pontarddulais, where George worked as a labourer in the tinworks. George enlisted locally into the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was known as the Carmarthen Pals Battalion, which moved to France in December 1915 attached to 114 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. George would have fought with the battalion at Mametz Wood in July 1916, and also during the famous capture of Pilckem Ridge in July/ August 1917. He survived the war, and was discharged from the army on 3 May 1919. George only enjoyed six months of peace, being taken ill with pneumonia, he died at home on 5 November 1919, aged 24, his war service having obviously weakened him. The memorial misleadingly shows Frank Banwell, which is the name his brother was known by, whilst Francis himself was known as George! George is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service.

 

Sidney Rees Bell, Lance Corporal, 3684, Welsh Regiment. Sidney was born in 1876, the son of Rees and Ann Bell, of 3, King Street, Llandeilo. Sydney was a Tailor, and had worked at Skewen, where he married Eleanor, and the couple raised their first four children there before returning to Llandeilo in 1910, moving into 3, Brynawel Terrace. Sidney served with the 4th Welsh early in the war, later transferring into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. No more is known of Sydney’s time at war, but he died at 2, Wellfield Terrace, Llandeilo due to pulmonary tuberculosis and exhaustion, which had been brought on by his war service, on 12 February 1920, aged 44. Sidney is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service.

 

Eliezor Bishop Bowen, Private, 201423, Welsh Regiment. Eliezor was born in 1885, the son of David and Mary Bowen, of 5, Club House, Felinfoel. He worked as a Collier prior to the war, then served during the war with the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Eliezor survived the war, returning to live with his brother-in law and sister, John and Catherine Jenkins, at Bryngwili, Pontyberem. Eliezor had suffered because of his wartime service, dying of Chronic Otorrhoea on 7 May 1920, aged 35. Eliezor is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service.

 

Sydney Hodson Brown, Private, Welsh Regiment. Sydney (also spelt Sidney) was born at St. Mary's, Pembroke on 12 March 1886, the Son of Thomas and Ellen Brown, of Kingsword House. He had served an apprenticeship with the GWR as a Fitter and Turner at Swindon prior to the war, before enlisting into the Welsh Regiment. Sydney was hospitalised at Carmarthen after the war. He died at Carmarthen Infirmary of pulmonary tuberculosis on 20 August 1919, aged 33. Sydney is buried at Pembroke (Llanion) Cemetery. Sydney is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service.

 

Albert Victor Carman, Able Seaman, Bristol Z/468, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Albert was born at Winchester in 1898, the son of William and Elizabeth Carman. The family had moved to Pontardulais prior to 1906, and resided at 36, Ty-ny-bone Road, Pontardulais. Albert worked as a Tinworker prior to the war, and enlisted on 29 December 1914 into the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, giving his date of birth as 31 December 1896, as he was otherwise too young. He was posted to Drake Battalion, joining them at Gallipoli on 17 July 1915. Albert was invalided to Britain suffering from conjunctivitis in October 1915, and was hospitalised at the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar, suffering with Hypermetropic Astigmatism. He married Lizzie Rees at Carmarthen early in 1918. It is not known if Albert went on to serve in France, but he died of influenza on 1 June 1920. Albert is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service.

 

James Ernest Codd, Sergeant, 2297, Welsh Regiment. James was born at Haverfordwest in 1871, the son of William Evans Codd and Martha Codd. He married Mary Ann Lewis at Haverfordwest on 12 August 1896, and the couple resided at 9, North Gate Terrace, Haverfordwest, where James worked as a Yeast Merchant. Between 12 March 1899 until 31 March 1908, James also served with the 1st Volunteer Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was renumbered as the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment on 13 April 1908, becoming the local Territorial unit. James attended the annual camp several times over the coming years, and at the outbreak of the Great War was embodied for service with ‘A’ Company, 4th Welsh at Haverfordwest. James was by now a Sergeant, and remained on Home Service with the 2/4th Welsh, assisting with the training of new recruits for the front line 1/4th Welsh. James was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 30 September 1916 after becoming ill with bronchial asthma and a hernia. He died on 27 January 1917 at Haverfordwest, aged 45, and is possibly buried at St. Martins Churchyard, Haverfordwest. James is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his condition was not linked to his war service.

 

David Davies, Sapper, 790, Royal Engineers. David was the husband of Gwen Davies, of 7, Water Street, Llanelli. He was 28 years old when he enlisted into the 3/1st Welsh Field Company, Royal Engineers at Llanelli in May 1915. David was discharged from the army late in 1916 after being found unfit for military service. He died at Llanelli early in 1920, aged 33. David is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service.

Isaac Davies, Driver, 135383, Army Service Corps. Isaac was born in 1882, the son of David and Rachel Davies, of Cilsane Mill, Llangathen. He had worked as a draper for Morgan and Hayes Company at Cardiff for several years prior to the war. Isaac was initially rejected as unfit after trying to enlist into the army in August 1914, but on 29 October 1915 tried again, and was accepted to join the Army Service Corps. He trained as a driver, before embarking for France on 13 March 1916, where he was posted to a Motor Machine Gun Section as a driver. Isaac was reportedly gassed during the opening day of the Battle of the Somme, on 1 July 1916, and the roof of his dugout was later blown in by a German shell. As a result he suffered shell-shock, and was invalided home on 17 October 1916. After a short spell in hospital in Southampton, Isaac returned home to Cilsane Mill to recuperate, but died on 17 December 1916, aged 34. He was buried at St. Cathen Churchyard. Isaac's case was recently turned down by the CWGC because the cause of death was deemed as not being related to his military service.

 

David Sutherland Downie, Private, 1771, Denbighshire Yeomanry. David was the son of George and Anne Jane Downie, of Ashton In Makerfield, and the nephew of David Owen Jones, of Regent Street, Llangollen. He enlisted into the Denbighshire Yeomanry on 28 December 1915 and on 13 August 1916 was posted to No 1 Base Depot at Rouen. Within a day he had taken ill and was hospitalised at the 39th General Hospital at Rouen. He spent four months in hospital in France before being sent back to Britain on 7 December 1916 after having been diagnosed with epilepsy. He continued to have fits after returning to Britain and died in West Derby Union Infirmary in Lancashire on 21 May 1918, aged 23. David was buried in St. John’s Cemetery, Llangollen. His case was submitted to the CWGC in November 2016 but he was rejected as the cause of his death was unrelated to his military service.

Stanley Edwards, Private, 200893, Welsh Regiment. Stanley was the son of Edward and Elizabeth Edwards, of 19, Railway Terrace, Pontyberem. He served during the war with the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. Stanley served at Gallipoli with the battalion, and was evacuated from Gallipoli with the battalion to Egypt in January 1916. He returned home to Pontyberem on leave during the summer of 1916, and met up with his three brothers, who were all by then based in Pembrokeshire with the 2/4th Welsh. Stanley was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 3 April 1917. He died on 10 May 1923, aged 27, and is buried at Yr Hen Eglwys cemetery, Pontyberem. Stanley is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service and he died after the CWGC cut off date. The photograph of Stanley and his headstone have been kindly sent in by his Great Nephew Gary Jenkins of Cardigan, but it is a mystery why Stanley is wearing the uniform of the Royal Artillery.

Evan Daniel Evans, Private, 227428, Monmouthshire Regiment. Evan was the son of Evan and Elizabeth Evans, of Red Lion, Felinfach. He worked as a butcher at Pentre prior to the war and enlisted there on 10 December 1915 into the 2/1st Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment. He was posted to Lowestoft, but after over twelve months on duty took ill, and was diagnosed as suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. He was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 6 September 1917, and returned to the Red Lion, where he died of tuberculosis on 1 March 1918, aged 37. Evan is deemed as not being eligible for commemoration as his death is not linked to the cause of his discharge.

Thomas Evans, Lance Corporal, 5457, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Thomas resided at Gwargate, Pencarreg. He had served with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers during the war. Thomas survived the war, but contracted tuberculosis, and died at the home of his brother-in-law, J. Thomas, of Ashleigh House, Llandeilo, on 28 January 1920, aged 22. Thomas is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service. Thomas is shown on the left with his unidentified sweetheart.

Charles Field, Stoker 1st Class, Dev/277845, Royal Navy,  Nelson Battalion. Charles was born at Briton Ferry on 12 July 1875, the son of Isaac and Elizabeth Field. He married Eva E. Fox, and the couple lived at 40, Avon Terrace, Cwmgorse. Charles was a long serving Royal Naval rating. He originally enlisted into the Royal Navy on 11 September 1894, before enrolling into the Royal Fleet Reserve on 12 September 1906. Upon the outbreak of war, Charles was posted to Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Division. In July 1915 Charles was transferred to the fleet. He survived the war, and was demobbed on 4 February 1919. Charles died of pleuro pneumonia, aged 44, on 15 February 1920, at 22, Gorse Street, Cwmgorse. Charles is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as his death cannot be proved to be linked to his war service.

 

William Garnett, Trooper, 559, Welsh Horse Yeomanry. William was born in Treforest in 1885. He married Mabel Couth in 1904 and the couple had a son, William Walter Garnett, who was born in 1911. He worked at the Albion Colliery prior to enlisting at Diss, in Norfolk, into the Welsh Horse Yeomanry on 1 February 1915 and was posted to Gallipoli with the Welsh Horse in September 1915. By February 1916 he had become ill and returned home to 17, Coedpenwain Road, Pontypridd after being diagnosed as suffering from heart disease brought on by rheumatic fever which he had contracted in Gallipoli. William died of heart failure while undergoing an operation after falling a horse on 1 June 1916. Because of this fact, he is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC, as even though he had only recently been invalided due to heart disease, his death is deemed to have been caused by the operation.

 

Robert John Guy, Private, 4538, Monmouthshire Regiment. Robert was born at Llanelli in 1898. He enlisted on 1 May 1916 into the 1st Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment, which was a Territorial unit, which became one of the first TA battalions to move to France on 13 February 1915. It is not known if Robert served in France, but he was discharged on 15 September 1916 due to sickness, and looks to have married Mary A. Bowen at Llanelli in the summer of 1917. He survived the war, taking up work as a crane driver in the steelworks. Robert died of tuberculosis at 3, New Dock Road, Llanelli on 23 February 1921, aged 23. The death certificate shows that his tuberculosis was brought on by a blow from the lever of a crane! As a result, Robert is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC and his case was rejected. I am no doctor, but I would not think that a blow from a lever would bring on TB!

 

David Hobson, Private, 44976, Northumberland Fusiliers. David was the son of John and Jane Hobson, of Ivy Mount, Tyncoed, Great Orme’s Head, Llandudno. He had enlisted into the Northumberland Fusiliers at Llandudno on 22 November 1915 and was badly wounded in France early in 1918. After having spent several months in hospital he was discharged as medically unfit on 16 July 1918. He died at Ivy Mount, Tyn y Coed Road, Llandudno on 21 April 1919, aged 23, and is buried in Llandudno (St. Tudno's) Churchyard. His case was submitted to the CWGC in November 2016 but was immediately rejected due to the cause of death not being related to the cause of him being discharged.

 

Walter Stanley Hughes, Corporal, 13771, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Walter was the son of Alfred William and Georgina Hughes, 7, Clwyd Street, Rhyl and the husband of Louisa Hughes (nee Perry), of 72, Jubilee Street, Shotton. He enlisted at Wrexham on 7 September 1914 into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and was posted to their 10th Battalion, which was training at Colwyn Bay. Walter was discharged from the army after being found medically unfit for further service on 6 February 1915 after being diagnosed as having contracted tuberculosis, and died at7, Clywd Street, Rhyl on 17 February 1915. His case was submitted to the CWGC in November 2016 but was immediately rejected due to the cause of death not being related to the cause of him being discharged.

 

Cecil George James, M32049, Writer, Royal Navy. Cecil was born at Milford Haven on 27 January 1900, the son of Alfred and Alice James. The family moved to Bryn Teify, Cwmann around 1907, where Alfred took up work as a painter and photographer. On 18 June 1918, Cecil enlisted into the Royal Navy, and was posted to Portsmouth, where he received his basic training at HMS Victory. He was then posted to HMS Birmingham, but was taken ill with Pulmonary Tuberculosis, and sent to Haslar Royal Naval Hospital in September 1920. Cecil was released from hospital, and returned home to Cwmann, but died there on 15 September 1921, aged 21. He was buried at Lampeter on 19 September 1921. Cecil died after the cut off date for official commemoration by the CWGC.

 

Albert James John, Private, 507, Welsh Regiment. Albert was the Nephew of Thomas and Emma John, of Pembroke. He resided at Shipping, Begelley prior to enlisting at Carmarthen in December 1914, into the 4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Albert was posted to France on 31 August 1916, where he joined the 1/5th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment, which was attached to 166 Brigade, 55th (West Lancashire) Division, and his service number changed to 242784. Little else is known of Albert, but he looks to have died at Cardiff in the summer of 1922, aged 30. Albert died after the official date allowed for commemoration.

David Emlyn Jones, Private, 443021, Canadian Infantry. David was born on 14 October 1874, the son of David and Margaret Jones, of Llwyngwyn, Penrhiwllan. He had lived in London around the turn of the century and had emigrated to Canada with his sister Maria prior to the war, finding work as a Haberdasher. He enlisted at Vernon, British Columbia on 16 May 1915 into the Canadian Infantry, and was posted to the 54th (Kootenay) Battalion, CEF, which sailed for England on 22 November 1915. The battalion then embarked for France as part of the 10th Canadian Brigade, 4th Canadian Division in August 1916, arriving in time to take part in the latter stages of the Somme offensive. By June 1917 David had begun to feel the strain of active service and was hospitalised for the first time. He spent the remainder of the war in and out of hospital for a variety of ailments, but remained on active service in France until after the Armistice. During all of his time in France he continued to send a substantial part of his wages home to his brother Evan, who by then was living in Brook Cottage, Pembrey. David was discharged from the CEF on 4 April 1919 and on 24 June 1919 he embarked from Glasgow aboard the S.S. Caledonia, returning to Canada for further medical treatment. He died in Edmonton, Canada on 23 May 1920, aged 45. David is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC because by his own admission his health had been damaged following the contraction of a social disease in London in 1902, and this disease had dogged him ever since.

 

William Maloney, Gunner, 16730, Royal Garrison Artillery. William was born at Barryrow, Cork in 1885. He was an army reservist and had served with the Royal Artillery for three years before marrying Ellen Condon at Merthyr in 1907 and the couple lived with their two children at 20, Thomas Street, Aberfan. He rejoined the colours on 7 August 1914 and was posted to No. 2 Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. He served in France before being discharged from the army as medically unfit on 13 December 1915 after having been found to have contracted tuberculosis. He was sent to the Aberfan Merlyn Hospital, where he died on 23 November 1916, aged 34. His case was submitted to the CWGC in November 2016 but was immediately rejected due to the cause of death not being related to the cause of him being discharged.

Albert Wilfred Mason, Private, 14131, South Wales Borderers. Albert was the son of James Edwin Mason, and Ann Mason, of Llanelli, and the husband of Elizabeth Ann Mason, of 34, Stepney Place, Llanelli. He was a well known sportsman prior to the war, having played at Full Back for Llanelli RFC before playing professionally for Salford. Albert enlisted at Llanelli into the South Wales Borderers in September 1914, and was posted to the 4th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, which was attached to 40 Brigade, 13th (Western) Division. Albert was discharged from the army as medically unfit on 28 May 1915, after being diagnosed with phthisis, and suffering from chest pains. His medical records show that the 4th SWB had been billeted in terrible conditions, and that this had brought about Albert’s illness. Albert died on 22 December 1916, aged 32. His brother David James Mason also fell. Albert's case was put forward by myself to the CWGC on 4 August 2013, but was rejected on 22 July 2014 as it is thought that the medical cases do not tie up. An appeal was put in by myself, but after further deliberation he was again rejected.

 

Charles Sidney Matthews, Able Seaman, 202510, Royal Navy. Charles was born on 1 May 1883, the Son of George and Jane Matthews, of Quarry Cottage, Tenby. He later resided at 19, Lower Park Road, Tenby. Charles enlisted on 1 May 1901, and served for the next twelve years on a variety of warships, including HMS Black Prince and HMS Defiance. In May 1913 he transferred to the Royal Fleet Reserve, and at the outbreak of the Great War served on HMS Jupiter, Severn, Vivid II, Defiance, Tarpow and Leander before being demobbed on 1 December 1919. There is no record of his death with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, but he died in Pembrokeshire in September 1921, aged 39, and was buried on 23 September 1921 at St. Mary's Church Cemetery, Tenby. Charles died after the cut off date for official commemoration by the CWGC.

 

Peter McKelvie, Driver, W/5033, Royal Field Artillery. Peter was born at Tenby on 26 May 1881, the son of John and Catherine McKelvie. He worked as a Stableman and Llanelli prior to the war, and resided at Lyndhurst, Tunnel Road, Llanelli. Peter enlisted at Llanelli on 26 May 1915 into the Welsh Divisional Royal Field Artillery, and entrained for their camp at Pwllheli. He was discharged from the army on 17 September 1915, having contracted pulmonary tuberculosis while in camp at Pwllheli. Peter re-enlisted into the Royal Defence Corps, but was badly injured in an accident and discharged again on 1 March 1917, and returned to Llanelli to live with his brother John McKelvie. Peter died at Llanelli on 12 March 1918, aged 36. Peter's death certificate shows that he died of bronchitis, so doesn't exactly tie in with his tuberculosis and as a result his case has been rejected.

 

Thomas Miles, Private, 27433, Royal Defence Corps. Thomas was born at Carmarthen in 1862, the son of Moses and Margaret Miles. By 1891 he was working at Cardiff and by 1901 was lodging with the Bish family at Merthyr Tydfil. At some time afterwards had found work as a coal hewer at Kidwelly, where he then resided, prior to taking up employment at Pembrey Munitions Works. Thomas enlisted into the Welsh Regiment at Merthyr on 17 December 1915, giving his age as 43, and he stated on his papers that he had undergone previous military service with the Military Police. He was posted to the North Staffordshire Regiment in April 1916, and was posted to Guernsey in November 1916, where the battalion became the 17th Battalion, Royal Defence Corps. Thomas remained at Guernsey for the remainder of the war, and was discharged on 14 December 1918, his address showing Tymawr, Water Street, Kidwelly. He then tried to get a war pension, and was examined at Kidwelly on 4 February 1919, after stating to the authorities that he had contracted asthma while sleeping with 'no mattress and only two blankets' at the Military camp at Barry Dock in the winter of 1916. Thomas's papers aren't clear if his application for pension was turned down or not, but he was obviously suffering, as he died at Tymawr, Water Street, Kidwelly on 13 December 1919, aged 57. His death certificate shows that he died of bronchitis whilst an army pensioner. Sadly there is no proof on his service papers to enable Thomas to be commemorated by the CWGC.

 

Charles Phipps, Private, 10262, South Wales Borderers. Charles was the son of Thomas and Annie Phipps, of 4, Duke Street, Blaenavon. He worked as a coal miner before enlisting at Pontypool into the South Wales Borderers on 29 June 1909. Charles served with both the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the South Wales Borderers in the years leading up to the outbreak of war, and by then was in China with the 2nd Battalion, serving in the battalions’ famous action at Tientsin. He took part in the landing of the battalion at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915 and served on the peninsula until being shot in the face on 9 April 1915. Whilst at hospital in Malta he was found to have a large sarcoma and was eventually sent to the Cancer Hospital at Glasgow for treatment, where he was discharged from the army as medically unfit. He died as a result of sarcoma of the femur on 13 November 1916, aged 25. Despite my efforts, Charles has been deemed as ineligible for official commemoration by the CWGC as he had been discharged from the army prior to his death. The fact that he was a long serving soldier when he became ill does not seem to sway this opinion. He is commemorated on the  Blaenavon War Memorial.

 

William David Prosser, Private, 266592, Welsh Regiment. William was born at Blaenllechau, Rhondda in 1900. By 1911 he was living with his grandparents, Simon and Frances James, of Esgairwilym, Blaenporth. William enlisted on 25 July 1916 into the 4th (Reserve) Battalion, the Welsh Regiment. He was posted to France on 2 February 1918, and joined the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was in positions near Bapaume, attached to 58 Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. William reached the battalion on 19 February, but was in action for little more than a week before he was seriously wounded, suffering a gunshot wound to his arm, and shell fragments to his leg and body, which fractured his humorous. William underwent several months of treatment at the 3rd Scottish General Hospital, before being discharged as unfit on 21 January 1919. He went to live with his Uncle, Thomas Price, at 72, High Street, Ferndale, but died there of his wounds on 2 May 1919, aged 20. William's death certificate shows that he died of a fit, and this is deemed by the CWGC to be insufficient evidence.

 

Morley Roberts, Private, 290449, Pembroke Yeomanry. Morley was the son of Samuel and Rachel Roberts, of Llywynyrhaf Fach, Betws. Morley doesn’t seem to have served overseas, but remained on Home Service with the Pembroke Yeomanry. He was working as a colliery haulier prior to the war. He became ill after suffering an intestinal haemorrhage which caused him to fall into a coma and died on 25 July 1917 at Llwynyrhaf-Fach, aged 23. He was serving with the 3/1st Pembroke Yeomanry at the time he fell ill, but is impossible to prove whether or not he is eligible for commemoration as his service papers do not survive and his case has been rejected.

 

Henry Scourfield, Private, 44039, Royal Garrison Artillery. Henry was the son of Henry and Eliza Scourfield, of Hawkes Villa, Carmarthen. He was working at Gilfach Goch by the turn of the century, and married Hannah Beatrice Nicholas, of 10, Bryn Teg Terrace, Gilfach Goch on 24 July 1906. The couple had three daughters prior to Henry enlisting into the Royal Artillery. Henry served in France with 133 Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery from 24 June 1915, until being discharged on 15 January 1919. His time in France had taken a toll on his health, and Henry died on 4 April 1919, aged 35. He was buried with full military honours, four days later, at Glyn Ogwr Cemetery, Glamorgan. Henry is not commemorated by the CWGC, and was recently turned down for commemoration (March 2015) as his death has been deemed to have not been as a result of his military service. (Although his service papers show that his illness was 80% attributable to his service!).

William Stroud, Sergeant Major, 48071, Royal Army Medical Corps. William was the husband of Keren Stroud, of Feeder Row, Cwmcarn. He enlisted into the 130th (St. John’s) Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps on 12 December 1914. William embarked with the ambulance for France on 3 December 1915, where it assembled with the remainder of the 38th (Welsh) Division. He was wounded in action on 4 May 1917 but returned to duty, to be mentioned in despatches later that year. On 23 January 1918 he was admitted to his own field ambulance before being moved to 54 Casualty Clearing Station and then to Hospital in Calais. William was sent back to England on 21 March 1918 and was discharged from the army on 26 July 1918 after being diagnosed with contracting pleurisy. He died at Bath on 18 December 1918, aged 52, and is buried in Risca Old Cemetery. His case will be submitted to the CWGC in November 2016.

 

George Harding Thomas, Rifleman, King's Royal Rifle Corps. George was the son of Charles Howard Thomas, of Marine Gardens, Milford. He enlisted into the army at the start of the war, and was posted to France on 17 November 1915 with the 16th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, which was attached to 100 Brigade, 33rd Division. George was badly wounded after being struck by shrapnel during November, and returned to England, where he was hospitalised at Poole. After recovery he moved to Winchester Barracks, before being sent back out to France early in 1916. George was wounded again on the Somme in July 1916, and again returned home for treatment, before being discharged as medically unfit. He then worked in a munitions factory, and in the summer of 1918 married Margaret M Davies, of Aberdare, at Milford. During 1918 the young couple were both struck down with influenza, and George died. He was 26 years old, and was buried with full military honours in Milford Haven Cemetery. He is not eligible for commemoration by the CWGC.

 

Walter Williams, Private, 4552, Pembroke Yeomanry. Walter was born in 1890, the son of Elizabeth Williams, of Wheaten Sheaf, Abergorlech. He was a carpenter prior to the war, and enlisted at Carmarthen into the Pembroke Yeomanry on 14 November 1914. Walter served on home service for almost a year, probably with the 2/1st Pembroke Yeomanry. He became ill, and was admitted to the 2nd Cyclist Brigade Field Ambulance at Oxford, where he was diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis. Walter was discharged from the Yeomanry as unfit on 13 October 1916. He died at the Wheaten Sheaf, Abergorlech on 8 July 1918, aged 28. Walter's case was passed to the CWGC in August 2013 and he was rejected on Wednesday 9 December 2015.

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Website News

6 Mar 2018. Some more good news today that yet another Welsh soldier, Thomas David Rees, of Whitchurch, Cardiff, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

3 Mar 2018. Good news today that another Welsh soldier, Reginald Wilfred Collard, of Whitchurch, Cardiff, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

26 Feb 2018. The second volume of my latest book 'The Welsh at War' has been published today and is available from all good bookshops. Please see the Steve's Books page for details.

 

23 Feb 2018. Some good news today that another local man, Gwilym Bennett, of Llanelli, has been accepted as a war casualty by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

5 Feb 2018. The first volume of my latest book 'The Welsh at War' has been published today and is available from all good bookshops. Please see the Steve's Books page for details.

 

27 Jan 2018. Some good news again, that Thomas Arthur Edward Pugsley, of Ynysboeth, has recently been accepted by the CWGC for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

22 Jan 2018. I have received news that a sailor from Swansea, James Carne, who I had researched, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my work. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

1 December 2017. A new section has been added to the website, which will cover some war memorials in Glamorgan, more especially the memorials nearest to the county border with Carmarthenshire. More will be added as time allows.

 

4 November 2017. Some good news this week following the discovery, after much searching, of the grave of Private Thomas Davies, of Laugharne. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers page of the website for details.

4 May 2017. Welcome news this morning that a new CWGC headstone has been erected in Laugharne for Domingo Mobile, a sailor who I found to be buried there a couple of years ago. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 March 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated Welsh sailor, Samuel Arthur Griffiths, of Tredegar, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

8 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Llewelyn Owen Roberts, of Penmaenmawr, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

 

7 February 2017. Some more good news today. Another un-commemorated soldier, Isaac Owen, of Seven Sisters, has today been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC as a result of my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

20 December 2016. Some good news today that another uncommemorated soldier, Private Thomas Owen Davies, of Machynlleth, has been accepted for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for further details.

30 November 2016. At long last my latest book has been published: Welsh Yeomanry at War. Please see the Steve’s Books page of the website for details.

23 November 2016. Some good news today with the acceptance of another Welsh soldier, Percy Griffin Williams, of the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, for commemoration by the CWGC following my research. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

 

15 November 2016. I would like to thank the people of Laugharne, especially the members of the Laugharne and District Historical Society, for their welcome during their recent History Event on Saturday when I visited to make a talk about how researching the Laugharne War Memorial inspired me to create this website and to begin my writing career. It was a very interesting day and was well attended by the locals.

26 Sep 2016. After a lot of hard work I have finally managed to identify a soldier from Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Morgan Price James, who since the early 1920’s has been commemorated by the CWGC under the wrong name, James Morgan. Please see the Forgotten Soldiers section of the website for details.

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